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2015 - RSA Annual Meeting Words: 136 words || 
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1. Myara Kelif, Elinor. "Images of the Virgin and the Child Garlanded with Flowers of Jan Brueghel the Elder: Still-Life or Devotional Images?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the RSA Annual Meeting, Humboldt University of Berlin, Berlin, Germany, <Not Available>. 2020-02-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p753343_index.html>
Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: Images of the "Virgin and the Child garlanded with flowers" is an invenzione of Jan Brueghel for Federico Borromeo, who might have been himself the inventor of this visual formula. This personnal interest for a naturalistic and scientific representation of nature made Federico Borromeo’s collection unique and famous. It endorses also a very precise devotionnal fonction of the image of the Virgin framed with this "still-life", where the representation of nature, precisely by the use of flowers, plays a dedicated role. The connection made between these images and "real flowers" is revealed in paintings representing collectors cabinet, through a real bouquet of flowers exposed just nearby these images. It raises the question of the paragone between "real" and "fake" flowers as well as the question of the status of these garlands that I intend to study.

2011 - American Studies Association Annual Meeting Words: 350 words || 
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2. Gleeson-White, Sarah. "Hamlin Garland: Mass-Mediated Son of the Middle Border" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Studies Association Annual Meeting, Hilton Baltimore, Baltimore, MD, <Not Available>. 2020-02-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p509147_index.html>
Publication Type: Internal Paper
Abstract: Oddly, despite a wide-ranging and prolific career, Hamlin Garland remains a relatively neglected figure within the resurgent scholarly interest in US regionalism, an effect, perhaps, of the culture wars of the 1980s. Yet Garland’s reinsertion into regionalist historiography and American Studies more broadly, which I advocate here, is instructive for many reasons, not least because his career compellingly foregrounds the ways in which regionalist discourse and practices have always been so tightly bound up with the forms and institutions of mass culture.

Garland’s career peaked in the last decades of the nineteenth century, when innovations in print technology created, among other things, the mass magazine market. Inevitably, the once genteel profession of letters became marked by the structures and exigencies of an emerging corporate culture. This paper first maps Garland’s negotiation of the new market and its national, middle-class audience, to then move on to examine the ways in which he actively participated in other mass cultural forms. In 1916, for example, Garland produced cinematic redactions of several of his novels for the Brooklyn-based Vitagraph Film Company, the largest film production company in the US at the time. Although his scenarios are collected at the University of Southern California, scholars have overlooked Garland’s involvement in the relatively new medium of cinema. In 1936, Garland oversaw the mounting of a travelling exhibit, “Hamlin Garland and his Literary Friends” (later, “The Makers of American Literature”) that toured California and the Midwest. Indeed, the Garland at work in the early decades of the twentieth century, self-consciously positioning himself within the new mass cultural forms and institutions, seems a far cry from the writer of some of the key regionalist texts of the late nineteenth century: Main Travelled Roads, Prairie Songs, and Crumbling Idols.

In many ways, then, Garland’s professional experiences – his participation in a new mass market, his self-promotional activities, and his screen writings – can be construed as a kind of rehearsal of the way in which modernist writers, such as Faulkner and Fitzgerald, would come to negotiate the status of literary artist with the now thoroughly mass-mediated profession of authorship.

2006 - The Law and Society Association Words: 35 words || 
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3. Hoffman, Bruce. "The Problem of Culture for David Garland’s Thought" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Law and Society Association, Jul 06, 2006 <Not Available>. 2020-02-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p96446_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: In this project, I critically explore how culture came to occupy a central role in David Garland’s thinking, in particular by focusing on the changing relationship between history, philosophy, and sociology in his earlier work.

2009 - American Studies Association Annual Meeting Words: 498 words || 
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4. Berliner, Jonathan. "The Sweet, Suggestive Landscapes of Hamlin Garland and the American Populists" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Studies Association Annual Meeting, Renaissance Hotel, Washington D.C., Nov 05, 2009 <Not Available>. 2020-02-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p318150_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: My essay examines the work of Hamlin Garland in relation to the American Populist discourse that he helped to establish in the early 1890s. Much of Garland’s fiction during this period relies on counter-pastoral tropes whose realism, in a sense, talks back to romance, but these same early works are also marked by a persistent sentimentality, what Garland calls the “sweet suggestiveness” of rural American landscapes. From Sarah E. V. Embry’s Seven Financial Conspiracies (1887) to N. B. Ashby’s The Riddle of the Sphinx (1890) and Henry Demarest Lloyd’s Wealth and Commonwealth (1894), many Populist texts follow a similar rhetorical pattern: nature, and particularly American nature, is bountiful, but the fruits of this bounty are being denied to those who work the land. The subsequent portions of these texts set forth reform programs ranging from the free coinage of silver to government ownership of transportation and grain-handling infrastructure. The consensus view of Garland among literary historians is that he was a reformer insofar as he was a realist and that the quality of his work generally diminished when he turned to more romantic material. I argue that Garland, far from being a failed realist, was a driving force in the development of American Populist narratives wherein the antagonism of harsh present realities necessarily abuts sentimental depictions of a new, as yet only possible, world.

This reading of Garland’s work may help us to understand better not only American Populist discourse but a central element of the political itself. As the Argentine theorist Ernesto Laclau argues, political discourse is not articulated in “a stable and positive configuration” but rather through “catachresis (for instance, when we talk about ‘the leg of a chair.’” Because populism offers a heightened version of this metaphoric rhetoric, he argues that “populism is the royal road to understanding something about the ontological constitution of the political as such.” In the United States, nature has long been a symbolically charged rhetorical vehicle, and capturing this privileged signifier has been an especially potent way of amplifying one’s rhetoric. In effect, Garland and the Populists tried to position themselves as the party of nature. While scholars over the past several decades have viewed with suspicion this trope of staging the cultural as natural, this skepticism toward naturalization may obscure the complexity of the political scene. As Fannie McCormick, National Women’s Alliance president, wrote in her 1892 novel, A Kansas Farm, or, The Promised Land, the campaign meetings for the People’s Party were held in bucolic “groves,” “with the waving trees and the clear blue sky above them.” Populist rhetoric has been the object of critique at least since Richard Hofstadter’s The Age of Reform (1955). Nevertheless, Michael Kazin has recently argued that Populist “wordsmiths . . . may have been looking backward in order to vault ahead.” My essay explores the ways in which the naturalist political writing of Garland and the American Populists did not simply ossify cultural conventions but served as a ground for new social possibilities.

2010 - ASC Annual Meeting Words: 121 words || 
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5. Carson, Barbara. and Young, Michael. "Controversies Surrounding Registration of Juvenile Sex Offenders: Resistance to Garland's Penal Modernity" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASC Annual Meeting, San Francisco Marriott, San Francisco, California, Nov 16, 2010 <Not Available>. 2020-02-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p429714_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Community Registration of juvenile sex offenders is not specifically addressed in Garland's Culture of Control (2001) but debates on this topic epitomizes the processes he defines as Penal Welfarism and Penal Modernity. Originally the juvenile justice system was created to promote the welfare of children but, following legislative reactions to sex offenders, increasingly there are mandates for community registration of children convicted of sexual assaults. The present work is an empirical investigation of how one state, Minnesota, negotiates responses to juvenile sex offenders and attempts to dictate policies. As will be seen, Penal Modernity aptly describes opinions of the public, the media and legislative bodies but, via interviews with State treatment providers and policy makers, tenets of Penal Welfarism still operate.

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