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2006 - International Communication Association Pages: 43 pages || Words: 12572 words || 
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1. Pollock, John., de Zutter, Laura., Schumacher, Samantha. and Mitchell, Elyse. "Gay Rights: Nationwide Newspaper Coverage of Gay Adoption, Gay Marriage, and Gays in the Boy Scouts: A Community Structure Approach" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Dresden International Congress Centre, Dresden, Germany, Jun 16, 2006 Online <PDF>. 2019-04-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p91306_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: National cross-section samples of 21-28 newspapers examined coverage of three same-sex issues – gay adoption, gay marriage, and gays in the Boy Scouts of America -- using a “community structure approach.” Selecting all articles over a certain length published in the sample periods, city characteristics (including an innovative “Gay Market Index” and “Gay Legal Index”) were compared systematically with a composite measure of coverage combining article “prominence” and article “direction, calculating a “Media Vector” with maximum/minimum ranges of +1.00 to -1.00.

Pearson correlations, regression analysis and factor analysis found privilege or its absence significant for all three issues. If children are affected (Boy Scouts or same-sex adoption), a “buffer hypothesis” appears confirmed: The larger the proportion of privileged groups (college education or family income), the more favorable the coverage of (gay) rights claims. By contrast, the higher the “vulnerability” in a city (percents below poverty levels or unemployed), the less favorable the coverage of a gay issue not involving children: Same-sex marriage. Percent Catholic is significantly associated with favorable coverage of all three gay rights issues. Rotated factor analysis and regression of factors reveal two factors each accounted for 56 percent of the coverage variance for gays in the Boy Scouts, 57 percent for same-sex adoption, and 33 percent for same-sex marriage. Regional Media Vectors and public opinion were mostly aligned for all three gay rights issues, with both newspapers and public viewpoints most favorable to gays in the Northeast, both less favorable to gays in the South and Midwest.

2011 - International Communication Association Pages: unavailable || Words: 10110 words || 
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2. Usher, Nikki. "The Decline and Adaptation of Gay Newspapers – and the Rise of Gay News Blogs: Transformations in Gay Journalism in the Digital Age" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, TBA, Boston, MA, May 26, 2011 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-04-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p487588_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper (extended abstract) provides an in-depth look at the transformations taking place within the gay newspaper industry in the US. Gay print news has long been connected to the idea of a gay community and a corresponding idea of civic engagement. This paper challenges the notion of "gay community" and interrogates how the changing understanding of gay community might change the way we understand action. Furthermore, this paper will seek to be the first comprehensive academic look at the gay print news industry in a time of transformation, examining its economic models and suggesting the ramifications of each-- the stagnation, the adaptation, and the elimination-- for the gay community. It will then reflect on what mainstream media might learn from the changes within the gay news industry's economic structures.

2004 - The Midwest Political Science Association Pages: 11 pages || Words: 2726 words || 
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3. Egan, Patrick. "Gay Voters and Gay Issues in U.S.Politics: An Increasing Partisan Divide" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Midwest Political Science Association, Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, Illinois, Apr 15, 2004 <Not Available>. 2019-04-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p84013_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper uses data from exit polls conducted by the Voter News Service (VNS)
and survey data from the American National Election Studies (ANES) to show that gay
voters are very strong Democratic voters, and that identification with the Democratic
Party is becoming an increasingly important factor in how voters feel about gay issues.
The paper shows that the impact of sexual orientation on individual vote choice has
become as important as the effect of race—and that it dwarfs other commonly cited
factors in its impact on the vote. In addition, an examination of the opinion of the general
public on gay issues over time finds that party identification has played an ever-larger
role in the past two decades in determining how individuals feel about gay people and
gay rights. As political elites—demonstrated by roll-call votes in Congress—show an
increasing partisan divide over gay issues, so does the general public. More than ever,
gay voters identify with the Democratic Party, and the Democratic Party is identified with
gay rights.

2007 - NCA 93rd Annual Convention Pages: 33 pages || Words: 9224 words || 
Info
4. Booth, E. Tristan. "Reframing a Gay Male Public: Transsexual Gay Men as Counterpublic" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the NCA 93rd Annual Convention, TBA, Chicago, IL, Nov 15, 2007 Online <PDF>. 2019-04-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p186961_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: One thinks of the gay male community as a counterpublic when viewing it through the lens of the larger—primarily heterosexual—public. However, if it becomes clear that some subset of this community exists in a counterpublic relationship relative to the larger community, then the gay male community could be viewed as a dominant public. One such co-culture is the community of transsexual gay men. This paper demonstrates the existence of this public-counterpublic relationship.

2009 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: 28 pages || Words: 8604 words || 
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5. Thing, James. "Virtually Gay: The Internet and the Construction of Hybrid Queer Identities and Transnational Gay Cultures" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, Aug 07, 2009 Online <PDF>. 2019-04-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p309912_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper draws on my dissertation which is a mutli-sited ethnography of sexual identity formation among queer men in Mexico City and Cuernavaca and queer Mexican immigrant men living in Los Angeles. Based on interviews with the immigrant and non-immigrant participants and hundreds of hours of participant observation, this paper explores the potential impact that the Internet has on the development of sexual identities and transnational queer communities for the men in my study. I show that the men in my study, through their use of the Internet, are part of a transnational Pan-Latino gay culture since most of their virtual contact takes place with other queer Spanish-speaking Latinos worldwide I argue that the Internet acts as an agent of socialization where certain ideas and discourses about what it means to be gay as well as certain established norms and practices shape the sexual subjectivities and queer communities of the informants.

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