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2010 - Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication Pages: unavailable || Words: 6428 words || 
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1. Stephens, Donna. and Heo, Nokon. "Integration or Law and Order - Editorial Stances of the Arkansas Gazette during the Central High Crisis" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication, The Denver Sheraton, Denver, CO, Aug 04, 2010 Online <PDF>. 2019-09-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p434998_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The study examines the editorial stances of the Arkansas Gazette during the Central High Crisis. In order to test proposed hypotheses, two independent coders conducted a content analysis of eighty-eight Gazette editorials that ran on the topic of the Central High Crisis from September 1, 1957 through May 27, 1959, as reproduced in the book, Crisis in the South: The Little Rock Story. Editorials were coded for three categories of variables: the Ultimate Message of the Editorial; Attitude of the Editorial toward Faubus, Brown vs. Education, President Eisenhower, and the Tactics of the Segregationists; and words or phrases commonly used to convey the newspaper’s attitudes were also analyzed for qualitative analysis. The results showed that the Arkansas Gazette advocated a law-and-order stance rather than one that favored integration during the Central High Crisis. The Gazette was overwhelmingly negative regarding Governor Faubus and the tactics of the segregationists. Also it was found that the Gazette’s editorials took no real stance toward Brown or Eisenhower during this time period. The results were discussed in the context of journalistic perspectives.

2017 - Association for Asian Studies - Annual Conference Words: 232 words || 
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2. Mokros, Emily. "Seeing the Qing State through "all the Gazettes of China"" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Asian Studies - Annual Conference, Sheraton Centre Toronto Hotel, Toronto, Canada, <Not Available>. 2019-09-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1190735_index.html>
Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: Read by officials, missionaries and diplomats, literati and scholars, and ordinary people in China, Jesuit missionaries introduced the “Peking Gazette” as a prominent and essential information source about the Qing Empire to European readers in the early eighteenth century. In their reports, missionaries exalted the court gazette as an instrument of authoritarian power, which compared favorably to the disorder and bias of European gazettes. Throughout the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, nearly every substantive work on China offered a description of the court gazette that related the production and control of the gazette to the nature of Chinese imperial power. However, European assessments of the gazette increasingly questioned how the court gazette could both uphold and undermine the autocratic power of the Qing Emperor. How was it that the autocratic Chinese Emperor could submit his decisions to the judgment of public opinion? In the pages of the gazette, European interpreters attested, could be read the contradictions at the heart of the Qing Empire. This paper demonstrates how Jesuit accounts written in the early Yongzheng reign influenced a long tradition of European commentary on the relationship between news and power in eighteenth and nineteenth-century China. It argues that while earlier writings on the gazette related specifically to the political campaigns of the Yongzheng Emperor, by the nineteenth century European interpreters of the Chinese gazette invoked broader judgments about the breakdown of Qing imperial power.

2012 - International Communication Association Pages: unavailable || Words: 4648 words || 
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3. Sreekumar, T.T.. and Vadrevu, Shobha. "“If I Can, I Legislate. If I Can’t, I Gazette”: Political Twitterati and Democracy in Singapore" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Sheraton Phoenix Downtown, Phoenix, AZ, May 24, 2012 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-09-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p555484_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper explores the role of social media in the politicization of public debate, with specific focus on the small state of Singapore, which, paradoxically, is as well known for its highly wired population as it is for its comparably lower level of online political participation. Against the global backdrop of emerging democratic movements, the May 2011 General Election in Singapore in which an opposition party substantially increased its representation in parliament has triggered off debates on the role of social media in realizing the surprise win. The study explores the phenomenon by taking a closer look at the Singaporean political twitterati probing into the process of gradual democratization of political engagement leading to the growth of a Singaporean public on Twitter. The study focuses attention on understanding the limited yet important implications of the rise of the political twitterati for liberal democracy in Singapore.

2008 - The 59th Annual Meeting of the American Research Center in Egypt Pages: 2 pages || Words: 658 words || 
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4. Ismail, Fatma. "The Wild Gazetteer Inside Room G Of The Hibis Temple" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The 59th Annual Meeting of the American Research Center in Egypt, Grand Hyatt Seattle, Seattle, WA, Apr 25, 2008 Online <PDF>. 2019-09-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p237641_index.html>
Publication Type: Abstract Proposal
Abstract: Most of the deities represented on the east and west walls of room G of the Hibis temple are very rarely attested. In fact, some of these deities are pictorially represented only in Hibis. Not only are the representations, but the titles of these gods are unfamiliar. They possess epithets that don’t occur elsewhere. By considering the scenes collectively as well as individually, the author is able to trace the reasons behind their unique grouping. The listing of a group of deities is based on more than just a theological association. Each god functions primarily as a protective entity and is associated with a specific place related to the roads of the western desert. The king is dedicating offerings to the divine lords of the territorial towns that were set at the foot of the cliffs at the eastern edge of the western desert, by means of which people reached the great oasis of Khargah from the Nile Valley. Therefore, the room celebrates the mountainous regions and the divinities of the wild.

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