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2014 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 8136 words || 
Info
1. Ryan, Krysti. "Parenting Outside the Gender Box: Raising the Gender-Nonconforming Child" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton San Francisco Union Square and Parc 55 Wyndham San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, Aug 15, 2014 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-10-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p721962_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This research project uses semi-structured in-depth interviews to explore the experiences of parents who are raising and supporting gender-nonconforming children as they navigate social institutions which may be unsupportive of gender diversity. Using a sociology of family and care work perspective, I examine the ways in which the labor of parenting is uniquely exacerbated when caring for a child who does not adhere to the gender binary. This study is currently in the data gathering phase of research development with preliminary results expected by Summer 2014.

2014 - Pacific Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 457 words || 
Info
2. Ryan, Krysti. "Parenting Outside the Gender Box: Raising the Gender-Nonconforming Child" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Pacific Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Marriott Downtown Waterfront, Portland, Oregon, Mar 27, 2014 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-10-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p707520_index.html>
Publication Type: Research-in-progress presentation
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This research explores the experiences of parents who are raising and supporting gender-nonconforming children as they negotiate social institutions that may be unsupportive of gender diversity. Using a sociology of family and care work perspective, I examine the ways in which the labor of parenting is uniquely exacerbated when caring for a child who does not adhere to the gender binary. This project is in the data collection phase.

2008 - American Studies Association Annual Meeting Words: 457 words || 
Info
3. Beauchamp, Toby. "Deceptive Documents, Classified Bodies: U.S. State Surveillance and Gender-Nonconformity" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Studies Association Annual Meeting, Hyatt Regency, Albuquerque, New Mexico, <Not Available>. 2019-10-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p244643_index.html>
Publication Type: Invited Paper
Abstract: On September 4, 2003, shortly before the two-year anniversary of the attacks on the World Trade Center and Pentagon, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security released an official advisory to security personnel. Citing concerns about potential attacks by Al-Qaeda operatives, the advisory’s final paragraph emphasizes that terrorism is everywhere in disguise: “Terrorists will employ novel methods to artfully conceal suicide devices. Male bombers may dress as females in order to discourage scrutiny.” Two years later, the REAL ID Act was signed into law, proposing a major restructuring of identification documents and travel within and across U.S. borders. Central components of this process include a new national database linked through federally standardized driver’s licenses, and stricter standards of proof for asylum applications. In response to each of these instances, transgender activist and advocacy organizations pointed to the ways trans populations would be targeted as suspicious and subjected to new levels of scrutiny.
This paper draws on the critical lens of transgender studies to examine contemporary modes of state surveillance, suggesting that gender-nonconforming bodies are bound up in surveillance practices intimately tied to state security, nationalism and the “us/them,” “either/or” rhetoric that underpins U.S. military and government constructions of safety. While transgender studies has primarily considered medical and psychiatric surveillance, the field has less often engaged connections between these practices and those of citizenship and racialization. As Siobhan Somerville argues, medical science has consistently linked race, gender and sexuality such that the norm of white heterosexuality becomes a marker against which deviance is constructed as a threat to western norms and national security.
Using the REAL ID Act and activist responses to it as central texts for analysis, this paper asks how links between racial, sexual and gender deviances are present in the surveillance of gender-nonconforming bodies that has escalated with the current “war on terror.” I argue that new legislation and security practices such as those mandated in the REAL ID Act draw on a long history of colonialist and scientific logics of classification and deviance, through which gender-nonconforming bodies come to be monitored and produced as deceptive threats that must be (often literally) uncovered. Crucially, the paper aims to broaden the notion of “gender-nonconforming” such that it is not simply shorthand for the term transgender, but rather engages the fact that bodies may be read as gender deviant in relation to racial, religious and/or national appearance. Finally, given activist organizations’ stance that new security measures prevent many transgender people from legitimately changing their identification documents, I examine the possibility that such responses may reconsolidate the necessity of such documents, obscuring the ways that appeals for state recognition require complicity with regulatory norms for bodies and behaviors.

2017 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
Info
4. Ryan, Krysti. "Bad Mothers of Girly Sons: Mother-Blame as Social Resistance to Childhood Gender-Nonconformity in Boys" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Palais des Congrès de Montréal, Montreal, Canada, Aug 12, 2017 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-10-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1254705_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Parents of transgender and gender-diverse youth who choose to support their child’s gender-variance through trans-affirming parenting practices often receive significant resistance from friends and family members who oppose their decision to reject the enforcement of hegemonic gender norms in their parenting. Drawing on semi-structured in-depth interviews with 45 such parents, I examine when and how parents experience and understand social resistance to their efforts. My analysis shows that most parents experience push back from extended family and friends by way of blame narratives that implicate mothers, in particular, in children’s nonconformity. I identify two particularly predominant types of narratives - permissive mothering and deliberate rebellion – that cite mothers as the proximate cause of their child’s gender difference by either having failed at enforcing gender boundaries or actively encouraging gender-variant behavior in their child in order to fulfill a personal need or agenda. Importantly, I find that these forms of mother-blame are almost exclusively directed at mothers whose children were assumed male at birth. I argue that such blame narratives are used as a targeted form of social resistance, in which the child’s gender is policed through the policing of maternal care – effectively sanctioning both mother and child for failing to live up to hegemonic scripts.

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