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Showing 1 through 5 of 1,626 records.
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2008 - The Mathematical Association of America MathFest Words: 59 words || 
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1. Tongen, Anthony. "If I May Make a Generalization, Generalizations are Generally Good (in numerics)" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Mathematical Association of America MathFest, TBA, Madison, Wisconsin, Jul 28, 2008 <Not Available>. 2020-01-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p275652_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Patterns are not only ubiquitous in nature and quilts, but also in mathematics. The ability to generalize patterns and convert them into algorithms is one aspect of numerical courses that is a foundational tool for mathematicians. This talk will present examples across the numerical curriculum through which students can gain experience in generalizing patterns to develop algorithms.

2017 - Annual Scientific Meeting of the International Society of Political Psychology Words: 148 words || 
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2. Bergh, Robin. and Sibley, Chris. "Distinguishing generally biased individuals from the generally negative" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Annual Scientific Meeting of the International Society of Political Psychology, The Royal College of Surgeons Edinburgh, Edinburgh, Scotland, U.K., <Not Available>. 2020-01-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1242429_index.html>
Publication Type: Paper (prepared oral presentation)
Abstract: To study how prejudice generalizes across groups, it has been popular to document correlations and latent factors in feeling thermometer ratings. Yet, an unspoken assumption about prejudiced individuals is that they are biased – the archetypical racist does not dislike blacks and whites in equal amount, but prefers one ethnicity over other. Thus, one could arguably expect (at least) two types of individuals – those who like or dislike anyone, and those who favor some group(s) over other groups. Using factor-mixture modeling in two large probability samples (total N>10,000), we found that (a) most people indiscriminately like or dislike everyone, and (b) some individuals like majorities and high status groups more than disadvantaged minorities. However, in the second study, including a broader set of groups, we also identified individuals who are biased against conventional groups, as compared to unconventional groups. Status- and value-based approaches to prejudice are discussed.

2012 - Southern Political Science Association Pages: unavailable || Words: 8139 words || 
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3. Gleason, Shane. "Not as Simple as Red State-Blue State: The Solicitor General, Interest Groups, and State Attorneys General in Amicus Briefs" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Southern Political Science Association, Hotel InterContinental, New Orleans, Louisiana, Jan 12, 2012 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2020-01-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p544346_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The solicitor general decides to file amicus briefs by balancing both law and politics; but he is hardly the only amicus who appears before the Court. Interest groups routinely file amicus briefs, but state governments are some of the most frequent amici who appear before the Court. While we know a great deal about interest groups' decisions to file, it is largely based on group ideology and group maintenance, we know much less about state governments' decision to file amicus briefs. The literature that does exist on state amici suggests state amici decisions are driven by the state attorney general's ideology. Via social network analysis of two terms, this paper maps the amici who file for (friends) and against (enemies) the parties the solicitor general supports with his amicus briefs. The results indicate interest groups and states use different decision making processes to decide when to file amicus briefs. Interest groups, as the literature suggests, appear to be motivated by ideology; they are friends with ideologically proximate solicitors general, but oppose the parties supported by ideologically distant solicitors general. State governments, on the other hand, are often both friends and enemies of the same solicitor general in the same term. This suggests a state government's decision to file an amicus brief is more complex than the political preferences of the state attorney general. The results presented in this paper represent the first step in a larger dissertation project on the decision to file amicus briefs.

2008 - ISA's 49th ANNUAL CONVENTION, BRIDGING MULTIPLE DIVIDES Words: 76 words || 
Info
4. Sorenson, David. "Generals and Politics: Proposing Civil-Military Competencies for Educating Colonels and Generals" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ISA's 49th ANNUAL CONVENTION, BRIDGING MULTIPLE DIVIDES, Hilton San Francisco, SAN FRANCISCO, CA, USA, Mar 26, 2008 <Not Available>. 2020-01-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p251134_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This paper builds on the institutional self-inventories completed in 2007 assessing the current state of civil-military education at the War College level. The researchers will propose a framework of civil-military competencies for senior officers to fill the current gaps in war college curricula. Approaches to elevating civil-military relations across the curriculum will also be proposed. Finally, making up for deficiencies in civil-military instruction at the lower levels within the military education system will also be explored.

2005 - American Society of Criminology Words: 185 words || 
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5. Latimore, T.. "For Whites Only? Assessing the Generality of Self-control, General Strain, and Social Bonding Theories for African-Americans In Comparison to Whites" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Criminology, Royal York, Toronto, Nov 15, 2005 <Not Available>. 2020-01-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p33171_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: At the individual level, very little theoretical attention has been given to the differential patterning of criminal behavior for African Americans when compared to Whites. Although patterns of offending for these two racial groups have generated substantial empirical attention and controversy, much of this research has been preoccupied with documenting the nature and extent of these differences. Relatively few studies have attempted to empirically assess whether the processes specified by prominent individual-level theories of crime are the same for African Americans and Whites.
This research addresses that void in the criminological literature by offering a comparative test of three prominent individual-level theories of crime by race. Specifically, using a sample of African American and White adults who live in three census tracts in Wake County, North Carolina, I examine the extent to which self-control, general strain, and social bonding theories can account for patterns of criminal offending for these two groups. Preliminary analyses offer some support. However, some findings are not predicted by theory. The implications of these findings for the generality of these theories are also discussed.

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