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2008 - International Communication Association Words: 234 words || 
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1. Lee, Sook-Young. "Women of Stuck-Generation and New-Generation in South Korea: Internal Dialectics in Transitional Mother-Daughter Relationships" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, TBA, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, <Not Available>. 2019-08-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p232163_index.html>
Publication Type: Session Paper
Abstract: There has emerged a new generation of women in South Korea: stuck-generation. These are women in their 60s who are supposed to enjoy their responsibility-free life after they have done their jobs by raising their children and supporting their husbands. Now, they should be able to reconnect with their long-forgotten friends and start their new lives. However, instead of new life, they are called back into home, this time, by another group of women, their daughters. Their daughters, the new generation of women, who want both family and career, need somebody who can take care of their child so they can work. With inadequate support from the society, their mothers are the only option they can turn to. Plans for new life for the mothers have to be put aside. As these two generations of women manage their lives, together and separately, dialectical tensions are abundant. This paper particularly explored two types: dialectics within themselves and with each other. To examine their relationships and dialectical tensions in them, this study interviewed 18 women who were in the arrangement where mothers were raising their daughters’ kids. Both parties struggle with the dilemma they are facing: To have everything, daughter asks her mother for another sacrifice; mother is willing to do so but feels resentment for her own missed opportunity; as those inner struggles transpire, guilt, anger, and love are all present between these two women.

2017 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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2. Karimi, Ahmad (Aryan)., Bucerius, Sandra. and Thompson, Sara. "Gender Identity and Second-generation Integration: A Case of Second-generation Somali Immigrants in Canada" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Palais des Congrès de Montréal, Montreal, Canada, Aug 12, 2017 Online <PDF>. 2019-08-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1255101_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In this study of second-generation Somali immigrants in Canada we explore our participants’ understanding of their gender identities at the intersection of ethnicity, religion, and host society’s cultural context to assess their integration into host society. Through analyzing gender as a component of identity among second-generation Somali immigrants in Canada, we aim to add gender as an analytical lens to explore the successful integration of second-generation immigrants. In this paper we analyze Canadian multiculturalism and the ways it allows limited space in national imaginaries for immigrants’ identities to be expressed and possibly lead to successful integration. Our findings, based on a qualitative analysis of interviews with 256 members of Canada’s largest Somali communities in Edmonton, emphasize that the host society’s national context and immigrants’ cultural background are simultaneously influential in successful integration of second-generation migrants. We found that second-generation Somalis have been able to reconciliate Islam, the religion depicted incompatible with Western values, and Canadian egalitarian gender norms. Our findings imply a need to avoid reifying Muslim immigrants as incompatible with Western countries’ cultural values and a need to open up sociocultural space for incorporation of immigrants’ identities.

2017 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
Info
3. Kirui, David. and Kao, Grace. "Does Generational Status Matter in College? Educational Attainment Among American Second Generation College Students" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Palais des Congrès de Montréal, Montreal, Canada, Aug 12, 2017 Online <PDF>. 2019-08-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1254571_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Using the 2004-2009 wave of the Beginning Postsecondary Students Longitudinal Study (BPS), a nationally representative sample of students who enroll in college in 2004, we examine generational differences in the relationship between educational aspirations, academic achievement, and college persistence among native-born and immigrant youth in the United States. Using the theory of immigrant optimism, which has primarily focused on high school youth, we examine whether immigrant parents provide children an advantage in completing their college degrees. Our analyses suggest that students who have at least one immigrant parent are more likely to complete college on time and less likely to withdraw with no degree compared to their counterparts with native-born parents. We argue that the optimism conferred by having immigrant parents persists through young adulthood.

2016 - American Political Science Association Annual Meeting Words: 282 words || 
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4. Crosston, Matthew. "The Lost Generation: Russian Analysis and the ‘Dulling’ of Generation X" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association Annual Meeting, TBA, Philadelphia, PA, Aug 31, 2016 <Not Available>. 2019-08-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1116558_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In some ways the United States has played a strange self-injurious game since 1991. It expected that the former rival accepted a new stage after the dissolution of the Soviet Union in which there were no more fundamental ideological battles and that DEMOCRACY in big capital letters was the undisputed victor. As the greatest champion of democracy this of course inferred that such acceptance also automatically declared the U.S. the world’s only superpower - the hegemon with no rivals. The intellectual community has been even more influenced by this perception. Barely any new thinkers or innovative minds have emerged from Generation X when it comes to studying and understanding the Russian Federation. One is hard-pressed to find a quote from anyone under 45 or anything not dependent on a ‘Soviet assumption’ for explaining political behaviour. Is it merely coincidence that almost every single Russian foreign policy maneuver today is characterized as some revanchist attempt to resurrect (symbolically or literally) the power and glory of the Soviet Union? Is it merely happenstance that Putin is evaluated only in terms of Soviet dictatorship and not even from the perspective of Machiavellian realpolitik? Whether it be the missile defense ‘shield’ in Poland and the Czech Republic, the bombings near the Sochi Olympics, Maidan and Eastern Ukraine, or events in Syria, what one sees are ‘analyses’ that could have been cut from the New York Times in 1965 and only needing the dates altered. No imagination, no innovation, nothing new whatsoever. This analysis explains the process that allowed an entire generation to become dullards on such an important region of the world and what is needed to bring about a true transformation on thinking about Russia.

2015 - International Communication Association 65th Annual Conference Words: 149 words || 
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5. Naab, Thorsten. and Schwarzenegger, Christian. "Would the Real Generation Please Stand up? How Theoretical Conceptualization and Empirical Measurement Shape Our Understanding of Media Generations" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association 65th Annual Conference, Caribe Hilton, San Juan, Puerto Rico, <Not Available>. 2019-08-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p984319_index.html>
Publication Type: Session Paper
Abstract: The idea of distinct media generations differentiates groups of people according to media experiences and practices allegedly typical and formative for the thus identified generation. While some concepts see the “birth” of a generation with the emergence, diffusion, and adoption of media technologies others define media generations according to shared media experiences typical for specific cohorts. In either variant the peculiarities of generations are emphasized while commonalities are sidelined. Based on 30 years longitudinal, representative national survey data and 30 media biographical interviews we outline empirical incongruities between different media generations: Generations are inhomogeneous with regard to the adoption and subjective meaning of media in everyday life while practices in the youth are formative for the stability of generation membership over the life cycle. We thus discuss ways to work with a concept of media generations that is not essentially derived from birth: neither of technology nor of people.

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