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2017 - Association of Teacher Educators Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
Info
1. Brooksher, Kelly., Cossa, Nedra. and Serianni, Barbara. "Get Ready, Get S.E.T., Get Tenure: How Junior Faculty Collaborate Toward TenureGet Ready, Get S.E.T., Get Tenure: How Junior Faculty Collaborate Toward Tenure" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association of Teacher Educators, Orlando Caribe Royale, Orlando, Florida, Feb 10, 2017 Online <PDF>. 2019-07-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1164554_index.html>
Publication Type: Roundtable Format
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Get Ready, Get S.E.T., Get Tenure: How Junior Faculty Collaborate Toward Tenure is a collaborative support system designed to facilitate scholarship, emotional support, and teaching for pre-tenure faculty.

2005 - American Sociological Association Pages: 25 pages || Words: 5970 words || 
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2. Cormier, Jeffrey. and Tindall, David. "Getting into the Media or Getting Out the Message: Evaluating Mediated Protest Actions as a Tool for Delivering Social Movement Messages" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Marriott Hotel, Loews Philadelphia Hotel, Philadelphia, PA, Aug 12, 2005 Online <PDF>. 2019-07-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p19521_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: In this paper we examine the relationship between environmental movement protest actions and the substance of print news media coverage. We examine the question: Are protest actions an effective way for social movement actors to get their message into the media? In other words, does print media coverage focus on social movement actor messages or simply on the protest actions? To examine this question, we content analyze a representative sample of print media coverage of the British Columbia forest conservation movement in 1993 and 1994. This period marked a surge in environmentalist protest and public concern with forest issues in British Columbia and therefore provides interesting data on the relationship between the media and the movement’s message.

2017 - National Women's Studies Association Words: 99 words || 
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3. Brooks, Abigail. "“Once You Get it You Really Get it” and “Painful Sex After Menopause Isn’t Sexy”: A Critical Gendered and Racialized Analysis of Appearance and Menopause-Centered Anti-Aging Pharmaceutical Advertising" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the National Women's Studies Association, Hilton Baltimore, Baltimore, MD, <Not Available>. 2019-07-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1269856_index.html>
Publication Type: Presentation
Abstract: I offer an in-depth, qualitative content analysis of the language and imagery in direct-to-consumer pharmaceutical advertisements that target middle-aged and older women with products and procedures to achieve youthful-looking and youthfully-performing bodies. Such advertisements skillfully promote youth-beauty-heterosexuality imperatives coded as individually empowering, as centered in free choice, common sense, and rationality, and even in a language of second-wave feminist consciousness raising. Advertisements for these “anti-aging” interventions pathologize normal, natural aesthetic and physiological changes in the female body and, by way of an absent presence, reinforce and re-inscribe the racist, heterosexist, ageist feminine ideal of the white, young, heterosexual woman.

2005 - The Midwest Political Science Association Pages: 51 pages || Words: 14489 words || 
Info
4. Merino, Jose. "Getting Money, Getting Political: The Role of Remittances on Democratic Transitions." Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Midwest Political Science Association, Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, Illinois, Apr 07, 2005 <Not Available>. 2019-07-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p86961_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: A empirical analysis of the effect of remittances on the probability of democratization of recipient countries from 1970 to 1998

2006 - American Society of Criminology (ASC) Pages: 1 pages || Words: 216 words || 
Info
5. Hall, Mandy. and Irwin, Katherine. "The Rich Get Prevention Programs and the Poor Still Get Prison" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Criminology (ASC), Los Angeles Convention Center, Los Angeles, CA, Nov 01, 2006 Online <PDF>. 2019-07-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p125954_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Recently, some researchers have advanced a “schools to prison” hypothesis and noted that punitive anti-violence practices such as zero tolerance policies, random locker and student searches, and the installation of metal detectors and security guards were disproportionately employed in urban schools that served working class students of color. The end result, according to some, was that African American students were being suspended from school at increasing rates after the 1980s and were eventually funneled into the criminal justice system. In this paper, we explore the validity of and expand on the schools to jails hypothesis by examining data from the 2000 School Survey on Crime and Safety, which includes data from a stratified representative sample of 2,270 elementary and secondary public schools in the U.S. We look at these data to examine whether poor, urban, racially diverse schools are disproportionately turning to law and order approaches to control violence. We will also examine whether racially homogeneous, wealthy schools are disproportionately utilizing state of the art prevention programs. In essence, we will investigate whether there is merit behind the idea that wealthy students get prevention programs while the poor students of color get law and order measures.

Amanda K. Hall
University of Hawai’i, Manoa
Saunders Hall 219
Honolulu, HI 96825
Office: 808-956-8885
akhall@hawaii.edu
Fax: 808-956-3707

Katherine Irwin
University of Hawai’i, Manoa
Saunders Hall 249
Honolulu, HI 96825
Office: 808-956-7950
kirwin@hawaii.edu
Fax: 808-956-3707

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