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2017 - Association of Teacher Educators Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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1. Brooksher, Kelly., Cossa, Nedra. and Serianni, Barbara. "Get Ready, Get S.E.T., Get Tenure: How Junior Faculty Collaborate Toward TenureGet Ready, Get S.E.T., Get Tenure: How Junior Faculty Collaborate Toward Tenure" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association of Teacher Educators, Orlando Caribe Royale, Orlando, Florida, Feb 10, 2017 Online <PDF>. 2019-02-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1164554_index.html>
Publication Type: Roundtable Format
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Get Ready, Get S.E.T., Get Tenure: How Junior Faculty Collaborate Toward Tenure is a collaborative support system designed to facilitate scholarship, emotional support, and teaching for pre-tenure faculty.

2015 - SRCD Biennial Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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2. Kenward, Ben., Eriksson, Malin. and Olsson, Karl. "Mean? You get candy. Not mean? You get rotten onions. Three-olds appease antisocial adults at the expense of neutral adults" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SRCD Biennial Meeting, Pennsylvania Convention Center and the Philadelphia Marriott Downtown Hotel, Philadelphia, PA, Mar 19, 2015 <Not Available>. 2019-02-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p959308_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Poster
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Toddlers and preschoolers are selectively prosocial, preferring for example to help their friends or those who have themselves behaved prosocially (e.g. Olson & Spelke, 2008; Kenward & Dahl, 2011). Investigation of young children’s selective prosociality has been confined to more acceptable forms such as favouring friends or returning favours. In adults, however, there are darker forms. One is appeasement, in which individuals favour powerful antisocial others in order to avoid becoming the target of antisocial acts. Demonstration of appeasement by very young children would have important implications for our understanding of their social interactions and could potentially establish appeasement as a fundamental human behaviour, as it is for other species. Such appeasement has not been experimentally established, however, possibly because antisocial others have been puppets or human adults who engaged in friendly warm-up with the participants and were therefore not viewed as truly threatening.

In three experiments we therefore investigated three-year-olds’ object allocations between on-screen neutral and antisocial human actors to whom they were only briefly introduced (Experiment 1 also included prosocial versus neutral actors). In the introduction, participants gave two actors candy, and the actors said “thank you”, establishing they could be interacted with and valued candy. The actors then destroyed (antisocial), praised (prosocial), or acted neutrally towards a third-party’s drawing. Participants then chose which actor to allocate further objects to (with different objects tested in different experiments). We predicted that participants would appease antisocial actors (and reward prosocial actors) by preferentially allocating them more candy (Experiments 1 to 3). Controlling for a simple attraction to salient actors, we did not predict participants would prefer either actor when allocating a less valuable item, a drawing (Experiments 1 and 2). Participants were further predicted to appease antisocial actors by avoiding allocating them undesirable rotten vegetables (Experiment 3). Experiment 1 and 2 stimuli differed only in that the actors were respectively face-on or side-on to the participants. Experiments 1 and 2 included only one pair of female actors but Experiment 3 examined generalizability by also including a second set of trials with male actors.

The predictions were confirmed. Across Experiments 1 to 3 (n = 100), the majority (62%) of participants allocated the antisocial actor(s) more candy than the neutral (95% CI [51%, 71%], p = .037, sign test). Across Experiments 1 to 3, of the participants who allocated unequal proportions of candy and control items (drawings or rotten vegetables) to the antisocial actor(s), 75% gave more candy (95% CI [61%, 85%], p < .001, sign test). The appeasement effects were significant on an individual experiment level in Experiments 2 and 3 (Figures 1 and 2). The relative weakness of the appeasement effect is consistent with previous results showing young children avoid rewarding antisocial actors. Presumably some individuals here appeased antisocial actors whereas other avoided rewarding them. The presentation will finally consider the underlying cognitive bases of the demonstrated appeasement behaviour and consider the results in the broader context of the developmental trajectories of different forms of selective prosocial behaviour.

2015 - SRCD Biennial Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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3. Yang, Chia-Chen. and Brown, B Bradford. "The Rich Get Richer, the Poor Get Protected: Facebook's Role in Adjustment to College" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SRCD Biennial Meeting, Pennsylvania Convention Center and the Philadelphia Marriott Downtown Hotel, Philadelphia, PA, Mar 19, 2015 <Not Available>. 2019-02-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p950989_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Poster
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Previous studies have indicated that, generally speaking, Facebook can be a useful tool in late adolescents’ adjustment to college; students use it to forge new relationships (Yang et al., 2014) and stay connected with old friends (Ellison et al., 2007). Yet, these studies have not probed whether Facebook is equally useful to students who vary in social competence levels, or perhaps assists students of different social competence levels in different ways. Drawing on two competing hypotheses regarding how people of varying psychosocial characteristics/resources may experience Internet use differently (i.e., rich-get-richer versus social compensation), our study addressed the issue by testing a mediation model. It was postulated that the relationship between social competence and college adjustment was contingent on students’ perceptions of how Facebook was useful and their patterns of Facebook use.
A sample of 325 students attending a major Midwestern University completed an anonymous survey with scales assessing social competence (Buhrmester et al., 1988), social adjustment to college (Baker & Siryk, 1989), college life satisfaction (adapted from Diener et al., 1985), perceived Facebook usefulness along four dimensions previously identified by the authors (Table 1), and four facets of students’ Facebook use (Authors, 2011). The sample was slightly skewed toward females (58%) and first- and second-year students (59%; Mage = 20.19); 84% were European American.
Because social networking sites seem to have different impact on first-year versus more advanced students (Kalpidou et al., 2011), we tested the hypothesized model separately for these two groups (i.e. multiple-group analysis). When all paths were constrained to be equal across groups, path analyses using Mplus 7.1 revealed an acceptable fit (χ2 (106) = 140.75, p < .05; RMSEA = .045, 90% CI = .021-.064; CFI = .97; TLI = .95.) Releasing the paths from the Facebook use variables to the adjustment outcomes did not lead to significant improvement: χ2 (98) = 134.90, p < .01; RMSEA = .048, 90% CI = .026-.067; CFI = .97; TLI = .94; corrected ∆χ2 (8) = 6.06, p > .05. Therefore, the results reported are based on the fully restricted model.
For both comparison groups, socially competent students were more likely to consider Facebook useful in maintaining existing relationships, and thus spent more time using Facebook and interacting with on-campus friends via the medium, which contributed to better college adjustment. On the other hand, less socially competent students showed better adjustment when they dismissed the usefulness of Facebook in pursuing romantic or sexual relationships, and thus reduced interaction with strangers via Facebook (Figure 1).
It appears that while the socially competent students do thrive by using the medium, supporting the rich-get-richer argument (Kraut et al., 2002; Sheldon, 2008), the less socially competent can benefit via a protection effect precipitated by disengagement from detrimental Facebook activities. This contradicted the social compensation hypothesis (Ellison et al., 2007) that people with less psychosocial resources benefit through active use of social media. Findings indicate that Facebook’s utility for late adolescents depends not only on patterns of use but also psychosocial characteristics of users.

2015 - Northeastern Political Science Association Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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4. Adams, Paul. "Get Them Early, Get Them Often: Recruitment of Political Science Majors in an Era of Declining Enrollment" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Northeastern Political Science Association, Loews Philadelphia Hotel, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Nov 12, 2015 Online <PDF>. 2019-02-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1044161_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The numbers of political science majors at many colleges and universities are dropping. While some numbers suggest a growth in political science majors between 2001 and 2011, at many institutions the reality has been a decline in political science majors. But political science isn’t alone. Majors in many other traditional social science and other fields have also been slipping for the past decade. There are many possible explanations for this trend. Many students and their parents have a perception that such fields do not translate into jobs and have been flocking towards STEM and other fields perceived to be more “safe” career paths. This is starting to be engrained at early levels in secondary and even primary school in many school districts around the country. The implications of these trends are that not only are the social sciences going to have to more vigorous defend and lobby for themselves but they will also need to go out and actively campaign and demonstrate that the social sciences, and political science specifically, are valuable, skill-building, rigorous, career-building, and attractive majors and fields of study. This short paper discusses and analyzes strategies and tactics used by programs to recruit majors to the field of political science and attempts to assess their successes and failures.

2005 - American Sociological Association Pages: 25 pages || Words: 5970 words || 
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5. Cormier, Jeffrey. and Tindall, David. "Getting into the Media or Getting Out the Message: Evaluating Mediated Protest Actions as a Tool for Delivering Social Movement Messages" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Marriott Hotel, Loews Philadelphia Hotel, Philadelphia, PA, Aug 12, 2005 Online <PDF>. 2019-02-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p19521_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: In this paper we examine the relationship between environmental movement protest actions and the substance of print news media coverage. We examine the question: Are protest actions an effective way for social movement actors to get their message into the media? In other words, does print media coverage focus on social movement actor messages or simply on the protest actions? To examine this question, we content analyze a representative sample of print media coverage of the British Columbia forest conservation movement in 1993 and 1994. This period marked a surge in environmentalist protest and public concern with forest issues in British Columbia and therefore provides interesting data on the relationship between the media and the movement’s message.

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