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Showing 1 through 5 of 2,333 records.
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2011 - National Women's Studies Association Words: 105 words || 
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1. Childers, Sara. "White girls, math girls, geeky girls, IB Girls: Reading for Privilege" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the National Women's Studies Association, SHERATON HOTEL (DOWNTOWN) ATLANTA, Atlanta, GA, <Not Available>. 2019-08-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p513143_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Abstract: Based on a multi-sited ethnographic case study of a high-achieving, high-poverty high school, this paper looks at how white high-achieving girls navigated and articulated their subjectivity at a predominantly black high school. Using Critical Race Theory, Feminist Theory, and Post-Structural Qualitative Research, I perform a discursive analysis of interview data and field observations to address the ways in which these students lived within and against the discursive constructions of a high-achieving white girl identity within the school and practiced and narrated themselves as raced/gendered/educational subjects. This paper places considerable interesta in how they appropriated white privilege in this high achieving urban high school.

2010 - NCA 96th Annual Convention Words: 146 words || 
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2. Edgecomb, Liz. "Good Girls, Bad Girls, Black Girls, White Girls: The Power of Race-Based Girlhood Rhetoric on Self-Image" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the NCA 96th Annual Convention, Hilton San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, <Not Available>. 2019-08-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p421323_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Based on a one and a half year ethnographic project at a 100% minority middle school, this paper investigates the resources and constraints in the code switching abilities of a group of Black 8th grade girls. These girls are adept at not simply linguistic code switching, but code switching between dominant and non-dominant systems of cultural capital (Carter, 2003). However, these subversions through code-switching, no matter how impressive in other categories, do not seem able to break the stereotypes of Black women as promiscuous, highly sexualized, and immodest propagated by the media—despite the girls’ own work against these stereotypes. As a group the girls work to maintain age-appropriate femininity, which they frame as based largely in modesty, thus countering the popular media images of girls of color. However, for all their skill, they are still unable to transcend a girlhood propagated on race and class stereotypes.

2017 - National Women's Studies Association Words: 97 words || 
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3. Owens, Tammy. "“Take Your Time, Girl!”: A Praisesong for Black Girls Who Refused to Give Up Their Black-Girl Time" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the National Women's Studies Association, Hilton Baltimore, Baltimore, MD, <Not Available>. 2019-08-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1269568_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Abstract: Black girls learn the value of time at early ages. They also learn that their race, gender, and class negate their abilities to negotiate time or “take their time” during defining moments in their girlhoods such as the transition from black girl to black woman or mourning the lives of childhood friends. In this essay, I use Black Feminist Thought to put my black-girlhood story of learning what I call “black-girl time” in conversation with media reports on three recent incidents of violence against black girls and women who made the dangerous decision to take their time.

2006 - American Sociological Association Pages: 14 pages || Words: 5160 words || 
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4. Waldron, Linda. "Girls are Worse: Ghetto Girls, Tomboys and the Meaning of Girl Fights" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Montreal Convention Center, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, Aug 10, 2006 Online <PDF>. 2019-08-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p104684_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Although boys engage in more fights than girls, there has been a growing amount of research devoted to understanding the aggressive and antisocial behavior of girls. Unlike boys, girls tend to engage in relational aggression, which includes anything from name-calling to spreading rumors to violent threats. Because of the elusive nature of this type of aggression, it may be less easily quantifiable. This paper interrogates girl fighting from a qualitative approach to help better understand the meaning of girl violence in public high schools, and to examine the perception that (despite statistics) “girls are worse.” This research reveals how fighting among girls can sometimes be a site for reinforcing a normative feminine role of the overly “emotional” girl, at the same time it can be constructed as a transgression of such ideals, where girl fighters are “tomboys” and “tough girls.” This is often intricately connected to sexuality, where girls who fight are sometimes perceived to be “gay girls.” This kind of homophobic name-calling may in turn work to reinforce heterosexism and homophobia in schools. This paper also examines how fights are tied to race, where the construction of “ghetto girls” can work to reinforce racist ideologies about violence in schools. Finally, this paper suggests that girl fighting can also be a site of situated agency, where girls fight to gain a sense of power and respect among their cohorts.

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