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2005 - American Sociological Association Pages: 20 pages || Words: 7049 words || 
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1. Moore, Paul. "Everybody’s Going: The Emergence of Movie-going and the Mass Market in Urban Life" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Marriott Hotel, Loews Philadelphia Hotel, Philadelphia, PA, Aug 12, 2005 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-11-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p19878_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: The emergence of the mass market as an organizing concept for distinctions in urban space is investigated through newspapers’ reporting and promotion of early movie-going in Toronto, 1907-1916. Before turning to film-going, I theorize the role of the newspaper in orienting the city dweller to the very idea of urban living, the city’s rhythms, options, and spaces. Specific to the movies, I then trace the shift from journalism, primarily concerned with understanding the audience and its attraction to the novelty pastime, to promotion, in which constantly-changing film titles, stars, and studios could stand in for the everyday urban practice: A mass market had been institutionalized. In particular, the brief fad of serial films with accompanying stories in weekend newspapers perhaps marks the moment when a mass audience was first assumed, or at least the newspaper reader assumed the subject of the movie-going. Serial films provided an umbrella text to explicitly show how the variety of spaces, times, prices, and classes of audiences encompassed a common practice, a mass practice.

2017 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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2. Young, Staci. "I am going where the women go: Black women's health care work in faith communities" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Palais des Congrès de Montréal, Montreal, Canada, Aug 12, 2017 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-11-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1254007_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Black churches have historically been at the forefront of education, social welfare, and civil rights. Their nurses are central to health improvement efforts yet there is no empirical literature on their roles. A contextual interview approach explored the culture of black parish nurses. Participants all had more than 10 years of nursing experience. Emergent themes included relationships, spirituality, visibility and advocacy, and ministry. The critical role of black churchwomen as health care providers aligns with the gender politics in faith communities. As such, health education and outreach should include their leadership efforts.

2015 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 17520 words || 
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3. Dunn, Michael. "Going, Going, Gone: The Online Labor Market and the Global Reverse Auction for Jobs" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton Chicago and Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, Illinois, Aug 20, 2015 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-11-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1010681_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The online labor market introduces a new spatial restructuring of work that removes nearly all temporal and spatial constraints. The spatial restructuring of work has created an “international virtual reserve army of labor” that directly contributes to lower wages and an increase in precarious work in the U.S. Given the nature and type of work that can be easily done online - primarily “idea-based” work, the more highly skilled U.S. workers, who have traditionally been more immune to globalization, have seen their “good jobs” at risk. This research analyzes wages in four occupations (software development, network and information systems, administrative support, and customer service) to understand how the online labor market is affecting American workers’ wages. Furthermore, this research more closely examines two occupations, software developer and customer service, to understand how the online labor market is affecting high-skilled “good” jobs and low-skilled “bad” jobs. Findings suggest that the online labor market is hurting wages in all four occupations but is disproportionately hurting high-skilled workers.

2016 - 40th Annual National Council for Black Studies Conference Words: 227 words || 
Info
4. Summers, Brandi. "The Corner: Black Bodies, Spatial Aesthetics, and the Go-Go Economy" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 40th Annual National Council for Black Studies Conference, Omni Charlotte Hotel, Charlotte, North Carolina, Mar 16, 2016 <Not Available>. 2019-11-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1136752_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Abstract
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: My paper explores the role of blackness as an aesthetic in the H Street northeast corridor—a Washington, D.C. neighborhood in transition. Washington is a crucial site where blackness has historically shaped and defined political, social, and economic relations. Through ethnography, archival, and media analysis, I focus on public space and describe how various forms of power and the aestheticization of everyday life are linked to the control of space and place. I also consider the production of racial aesthetics through the management of black excess on H Street. My analysis centers on, the 8th and H intersection at the center of the corridor is an important site for the spatial corralling of blackness in a specific location. The intersection is now the city’s highest bus transfer point – the number one bus transfer location in the District, and is a central gathering place for lower- and working-class black city dwellers. I discuss the concept of diversity as linked to the visibility of racial difference, rather than being simply rooted in demographic representation. Considering the uses and ordering of space, I investigate the multiple ways black bodies inhabit the street in an intimate manner; how public space is transformed by private acts often deemed aberrant. Where physical imaginations of the street are enforced as linear, blackness renders the street a site of paranoia, crime, danger, and excitement.

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