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2005 - International Communication Association Pages: 43 pages || Words: 13467 words || 
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1. Palomares, Nicholas. "Toward a Theory of Goal Detection in Social Interaction: Goal-, Perspective-, and Context-Based Similarities Determine Goal Detection Inaccuracy" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Sheraton New York, New York City, NY, Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-06-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p12615_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Individuals’ detection of others’ goals is an integral part of social interaction, especially when inaccuracy arises. Inaccurate goal detection, for example, can adversely affect goal pursuers’ and detectors’ communication competence. The current paper discusses three sources of goal detection inaccuracy—goal-, perspective-, and context-based determinants. Goal detection inaccuracy can be explained and predicted, knowing when a goal, perspective, or context of a particular social interaction are similar to (and different from) other goals, perspectives, and contexts (respectively). At the grossest level, goal-, perspective-, and context-based similarities impact the extent to which individuals can clearly perceive the linkages (i.e., cognitive associations) between various factors in a social interaction and certain goals. As factor-goal linkages are clearly perceived by a goal detector, the linked goals increase in accessibility, which in turn decreases the goal detection inaccuracy. Three sets of propositions are advanced focusing on how goal-, perspective, and context-based similarities determine goal detection inaccuracy.

2017 - DSI Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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2. John, Elicia., Hershfield, Hal. and Shu, Suzanne. "A Theory of Goal Maintenance: A Distinct and Close Pre-Goal Self Predicts Post-Goal Maintenance Behavior" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the DSI Annual Meeting, Washington Hilton, Washington DC, Nov 18, 2017 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-06-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1293385_index.html>
Publication Type: Abstract
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: We develop and test a theory of goal maintenance, applied to weight loss, where four studies provide evidence that the psychological distance and vividness of the past, pre-goal self is predictive of post-goal weight maintenance among individuals who recently achieved a substantial weight loss goal.

2014 - International Communication Association 64th Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: 5055 words || 
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3. Lee, Tae Kyoung. and Shapiro, Michael. "Story Character’s Goal Achievement and Goal Pursuit on Readers’ Implicit and Explicit Goal" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association 64th Annual Conference, Seattle Sheraton Hotel, Seattle, Washington, May 21, 2014 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-06-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p715686_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Previous studies indicated that when readers observe other’s goal achievement, they become less likely to implicitly pursue the goal—including health-related goals. However, observing other’s goal achievement may explicitly encourage people to model the observed behaviors. In an experiment, participants read a story in which a story character succeeded in losing weight (goal-achieved) or failed it (goal-failed), and she continues or discontinues pursuing that goal. When the story character continued to pursue the goal, readers implicitly pursued the observed goal more than when the character discontinued it while the story character’s goal achievement did not have an effect. On the other hand, when the character’s goal was achieved, as readers perceived more similarity with the story character, explicit behavioral intention toward diet-related behaviors increased. The results indicate vicarious goal satiation occurs because story characters stopped pursuing the goal—not because they succeeded or failed.

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