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2015 - ASEEES Convention Words: 106 words || 
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1. Miakinkov, Eugene. "'…Whoever Forgets about God, God in Turn Forgets About Them': Religion and Military Culture in the Age of Catherine II" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASEEES Convention, Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, <Not Available>. 2020-02-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1021773_index.html>
Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: This paper is based on a close reading of military manuals and military writings from the reign of Catherine II and examines how they have appropriated Orthodox piety. Religious themes run through much of military writing and played an important part in Russian military culture. Besides being an organized collection of beliefs and a source of comfort, within military culture religion served as a tool for moral teaching, for transforming recruits into soldiers, and into servants of the state. Religion was seen as a mechanism to reach into the soldier’s soul and to make it receptive to military values of respect for authority, self-sacrifice, and humility.

2004 - Western Political Science Association Pages: 20 pages || Words: 8335 words || 
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2. Briggs, Jamal. "Confusing God and Government: A Research and Public Policy Repairing the Breach: God and Government A Research and Public Policy Agenda for..." Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Western Political Science Association, Marriott Hotel, Portland, Oregon, Mar 11, 2004 <Not Available>. 2020-02-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p88244_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper is an analysis of policy relating to Charitable Choice. The charitable choice provision of the 1996 federal welfare reform law makes faith-based organizations eligible for government funds to provide social services. Black churches will undoubtedly be recipients of some of those funds. Few studies have been done on the role of the Black Church in the socio-economic mobility of African-Americans, or its social service role in the Black community. In this paper I will highlight the importance of the Black Church in the formulation and development of social domestic policy.

2016 - The 62nd Annual Meeting of the Renaissance Society of America Words: 149 words || 
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3. Tabak, Jessica. "Therapeutic Geographies in Donne's "Hymn to God my God, in my Sickness"" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The 62nd Annual Meeting of the Renaissance Society of America, Park Plaza Hotel and Hynes Convention Center, Boston, MA, <Not Available>. 2020-02-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1046451_index.html>
Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: Although John Donne’s poetic corpus contains many meditations upon earthly space, the one that shapes his late devotional lyric, “Hymn to God my God, in my Sickness” (ca. 1623), has unique therapeutic purpose. Written while Donne suffered a life‐threatening fever, “Hymn” imagines the poet’s body as a map that his physicians read in order to “discover” his disease. As the poem unfolds, however, it becomes unclear what type of map Donne imagines his suffering body to be: is it a Ptolomaic map that parses earthly space or a medieval mappa mundi that symbolically unifies that space through Christ’s self‐sacrifice? This paper will argue that Donne’s vacillation between these two map metaphors performs a therapeutic meditation upon two 17th century European modes of understanding the suffering body: an emergent medical model that would “discover” its physical mysteries and a still‐prominent spiritual model that would shroud it in Christ’s sacred mystery.

2017 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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4. Lopez-Sanders, Laura. "From “God Sent” to “God Damned”: Nativist Shocks and Race Relations in New Immigrant Destinations" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Palais des Congrès de Montréal, Montreal, Canada, Aug 12, 2017 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2020-02-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1252349_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: How do swings in nativism influence immigrants' sense of citizenship and belonging? This paper addresses this question by focusing on the integration experience of Latino immigrants as their group position changes in the racial hierarchy. Drawing from two years of participant observation and drawing from nearly 300 interviews in South Carolina, the paper shows how native-born attitudes and beliefs about immigrants radically shifted from welcoming to exclusionary. The paper introduces the concept of “Nativist Shocks” to explain the forces that immigrants identified as influencing their perception that Americans no longer want them. The central argument is that immigrants interpret salient events, including changes in state policy, activist actions, and public demonstrations, as having a 'racial face'.€ This 'face' is based on the racial group they associate with the event and crystallizes racial antagonism for immigrants and their sense of group position. Nativist Shocks ultimately drive the unauthorized away from some new immigrant destinations and, in many cases, back to their home nations. This paper enhances linear models that show immigrant integration as a gradual, long-term and monotonic process. I show that integration can be susceptible to shocks that induce immigrants to solidify their sense of group position and race relations over a short period of time.

2016 - The 62nd Annual Meeting of the Renaissance Society of America Words: 135 words || 
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5. Kim, Il. "Cusanus’s Path toward His Final Vision of God: Seeing God in Positive Theology" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The 62nd Annual Meeting of the Renaissance Society of America, Park Plaza Hotel and Hynes Convention Center, Boston, MA, <Not Available>. 2020-02-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1047424_index.html>
Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: In one of his final works, De Apice theoriae (1464), Cusanus says that only posse ipsum and its “appearance” should be taken into consideration. From such thinking, the concept of being disappears; creatures are no longer analyzed as beings but as manifestations of posse ipsum. In doing so, he reintroduces what he wrote in his Idiota de mente (1450): “Wisdom (sapientia) proclaims itself in the streets.” Scholars have wondered why at the end of his life Cusanus suddenly shifted from negative to positive theology. This paper proposes, however, that careful chronological examination of his writings, particularly De staticis experimentis (1450), De visione dei (1453), a sermon from 1456, De beryllo (1458), and De non aliud (1461), reveals Cusanus’ gradual shift toward an appreciation of and even ecstatic enthusiasm for the sensory world.

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