Guest  

 
Search: 
Search By: SubjectAbstractAuthorTitleFull-Text

 

Showing 1 through 5 of 2,743 records.
Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 549 - Next  Jump:
2014 - International Communication Association 64th Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: 1479 words || 
Info
1. Ali, Christopher. "The Goods Life: Local Journalism From Public Good to Merit Good" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association 64th Annual Conference, Seattle Sheraton Hotel, Seattle, Washington, May 21, 2014 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-11-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p711985_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This position paper contributes to the discussion of how to ensure the sustainability of journalism by arguing for a rhetorical and semantic shift away from labeling journalism as a “public good” to thinking about it as a “merit good” (Musgrave, 1959). While public goods suggest regulatory intervention only to the point that “respect[s] the wishes of consumers,” merit goods suggest regulatory intervention regardless of consumption habits (Eecke, 1998, p.5). That is to say that merit goods are deemed so socially valuable that they should be provided regardless of consumer behavior. Positioning journalism as a merit good, rather than a public good lends political economic leverage for increased regulatory and legislative support for journalism, and may revive efforts to ensure the sustainability of journalism, particularly at the local level.

2014 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 415 words || 
Info
2. Singer, Amy. "Doing Good Work by Selling Good Food: Balancing Political Consumerist Projects and Profit-Seeking" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton San Francisco Union Square and Parc 55 Wyndham San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, Aug 15, 2014 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-11-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p724430_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In the US and throughout its history, consumers have used their purchasing power not (merely) for self-indulgence but rather, or also, to be ethical, politically responsible citizens. Some consumer activists have pursued government regulation; others have mobilized boycotts, “buycotts,” and other forms of consumer-driven citizen action on behalf of social justice movements. More recently, emerging forms of “ethical capitalism” and corporate social responsibility (CSR) programs have become increasingly prominent within such political consumerist projects. Given this social and economic trend, one vital question is how we should theorize political consumption when when the political consumerist actor is a business, rather than an individual or non-commercial activist group.

At a time when philanthropy and social activism are being grafted onto merchandizing practices and corporate mission statements, my research explores how and why a profit-seeking enterprise might encourage politicized forms of consumption. This paper examines two such businesses. For the past four years, I have been doing research on two businesses which both work with Indonesian farming communities to create markets for their food products in the US. Both of these businesses are negotiating with the notion that profit-seeking companies, alongside specific kinds of politically motivated consumers, can “do good work.” My paper explores how such companies negotiate the tension between profit and social value.

2017 - Annual Scientific Meeting of the International Society of Political Psychology Words: 206 words || 
Info
3. Haste, helen., Xiang, Xin., Zhao, Xu. and Zhang, Siwen. "The ‘"Good Citizen" and the "Good Person": The discourses and positioning evident in young Chinese people’s concepts" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Annual Scientific Meeting of the International Society of Political Psychology, The Royal College of Surgeons Edinburgh, Edinburgh, Scotland, U.K., <Not Available>. 2019-11-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1253421_index.html>
Publication Type: Paper (prepared oral presentation)
Abstract: The definitions of ‘good person’ and ‘good citizen’ given by Shanghai and Nantong young people in 8th and 11th grade reflect narratives and discourses about personhood, about relations between persons, and between the person and the state. Seven emergent discourses reveal dominant concerns about ethical and civic problems and responsibilities. These are: obedience and responsibility, helpfulness, relating to others, educated and civilized personhood, self-perfecting moral goals, social change-making and socia improvement, and patriotism. While some of these might be common to many cultures, some reflect the specific local tensions between a society moving towards individualism and entrepreneurship and a society strongly rooted in neo-Confucian conceptions of social harmony, community and self-improvement, which were also evident in the ‘Communism with Chinese characteristics’ of the last 65 years. The discourses, and the narratives that illustrate them, also frame positionings of individuals, groups and institutions; however a strand throughout which is illuminating about Chinese cultural themes is the positioning of self as the agent: are the objects or targets of the actions or orientations the self, specific others, relationships in general, or the collectivity to whom one has responsibility? Is the focus of the self’s agency towards maintaining norms, or challenging or transforming?

2017 - APSA Annual Meeting & Exhibition Words: 140 words || 
Info
4. Friscia, Bronwyn. "Was the Good News from the Paris Climate Deal Good News for the Environment?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the APSA Annual Meeting & Exhibition, TBA, San Francisco, CA, Aug 31, 2017 <Not Available>. 2019-11-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1257122_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Scholars have debated whether international agreements enforce compliance or merely reflect state preferences, but less has been said about the logical consequence of either: that developed countries have incentives to support agreements that are systematically easier to comply with for them than for developing countries. I present evidence that this has occurred in international climate agreements, which have focused on getting countries to reduce their production of greenhouse gas emissions. Using new data from the OECD, I show that on the margins wealthier countries tend to consume far more emissions per capita than they produce, which enables them to comply with reductions in production while still driving the creation of significant emissions in developing world exporters through consumer demand. In ignoring developed world consumer demand for emissions, agreements like Paris may ultimately be remembered as political successes but environmental failures.

Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 549 - Next  Jump:

©2019 All Academic, Inc.   |   All Academic Privacy Policy