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2006 - American Political Science Association Pages: 25 pages || Words: 8974 words || 
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1. Salmond, Rob. "Size Matters for Growth: Government Size, Country Size, and GDP Growth" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Marriott, Loews Philadelphia, and the Pennsylvania Convention Center, Philadelphia, PA, Aug 31, 2006 <Not Available>. 2019-10-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p150903_index.html>
Publication Type: Proceeding
Abstract: Big governments lead to lower levels of short-term economic growth. But is the size of this negative effect the same in different nations? I argue that big government matters less for growth in small countries than it does in large ones, because large countries are more dependent on domestic sources of production and consumption for their economic growth than are small countries. I find support for this argument in a panel study of 23 industrialized nations. I also find support for a subsidiary hypothesis linking big government in the US and/or Japan with low levels of growth across the industrialized world, but especially among small open economies.

2009 - Midwest Political Science Association 67th Annual National Conference Words: 154 words || 
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2. Frye, Tony. "The People’s Republic of China’s Economic Zones: From Growth Poles to Life Cycles of Growth" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Midwest Political Science Association 67th Annual National Conference, The Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, IL, <Not Available>. 2019-10-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p362134_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: China’s conversion to capitalism began in the late 1970s with its implementation of Special Economic Zones (SEZs). Over time, these zones evolved into industrial, export, and technological development zones, which were used as a means of manufacturing rapid economic growth. _x000d_This paper will illustrate how those policies of differentiation, over time, became normalized and nearly universal in China’s sixty-plus economic zones (encapsulating virtually the entire arable territory of the PRC). Moreover, normalization has led to a rounding of the PRC’s life cycle of growth for economic zones, which has lessened the main effect and rationale for these zones—the use of differentiation as an engine of economic growth. With the PRC’s uniform adoption of tax and regulatory policies for its zones, encouraged in part by its membership of the WTO, the life cycle of these zones are reaching their apogee and will leave behind a localized form of governance and management of the Chinese economy.

2011 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 6632 words || 
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3. Nielsen, Erik. "New Urbanism and the Growth Machine: Can Growth Get Smart?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Caesar's Palace, Las Vegas, NV, Aug 19, 2011 Online <PDF>. 2019-10-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p507395_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In recent years, New Urbanism, also known as Smart Growth, has become popular in planning and development circles. These design principles and practices promote higher-density housing, mixed-use zoning, open or green space, and alternative transportation options. They have been adopted by many local governments as well as given support by national urban policies. However, they have yet to be contextualized in the political economy of place. There has not been rigorous research on how growth machines (coalitions formed on the basis of economic growth through the intensification of land use) and New Urbanism interact. My research intends to do this by proposing a “smart growth machine hypothesis”: Developers and coalitions that support New Urbanism will have greater concern for environmental and social goals than the traditional growth machines, which are notorious for the devastation of urban renewal and the expansion of suburban sprawl. This paper is a theoretical exercise and lays out the methods and approaches that will be used to test the smart growth machine hypothesis.

2017 - American Society of Criminology Words: 56 words || 
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4. Kraska, Pete. and Williams, Shannon. "Runaway Growth: Explaining the Crime-Control Growth-Complex" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Criminology, Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Philadelphia, PA, Nov 14, 2017 <Not Available>. 2019-10-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1278799_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Only critical criminology has taken seriously the important task of explaining crime-control behavior as opposed to criminal behavior. This paper explains the expansion of the crime-control industry using the notion of "growth-complex." A variety of theoretical traditions are called upon, including classic Marxism, critical political science, and a host of concepts contained in the late-modernity literature.

2014 - SASE Annual Conference Words: 164 words || 
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5. Sakamoto, Takayuki. "Three Worlds of Productivity Growth: Human Capital Policy Profiles and Productivity Growth Outcomes" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SASE Annual Conference, Northwestern University and the University of Chicago, Chicago, IL USA, Jul 10, 2014 <Not Available>. 2019-10-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p720414_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Labor productivity is an important determinant of the wealth of national economies and standards of living, as its growth explains half of per capita GDP growth. We show that there are three worlds of productivity growth among industrialized countries, by decomposing labor productivity growth into multifactor productivity (MFP) growth and capital deepening. The three worlds that emerge from the analysis are: 1) human capital investment- and MFP growth-dominant Nordic social market economies (SMEs); 2) physical capital investment- and labor productivity growth-dominant liberal market economies; and 3) continental SMEs whose moderately high human capital investments create decently high MFP growth, but whose low physical capital investments push down their labor productivity. The three worlds are broadly a result of the countries’ human capital formation policies and economic growth strategies—different policies add differently to the components of labor productivity. Overall, we tie the welfare production regimes literature to economic outcomes by showing that different human capital formation policies produce different economic outcomes.

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