Guest  

 
Search: 
Search By: SubjectAbstractAuthorTitleFull-Text

 

Showing 1 through 5 of 582 records.
Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 117 - Next  Jump:
2011 - ASC Annual Meeting Words: 179 words || 
Info
1. Webster, Daniel. "Relationships between Gun Laws, Diversion of Guns to Criminals, and the Availability of Guns to Criminals" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASC Annual Meeting, Washington Hilton, Washington, DC, Nov 15, 2011 <Not Available>. 2019-10-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p517077_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This study examines relationships between state gun laws, intra- and inter-state diversion of crime guns, and the probability that violent crimes are committed with firearms. ATF crime gun trace data at the city-level (2000-2002) for 53 cities and state level (2006-2009) for 48 contiguous states are used to measure diversion of guns to criminals shortly following (< 2 years) retail sale and exportation of guns later used in crimes in other states . UCR data are used to measure the percentage of aggravated assaults, robberies, rapes, and murders committed with a firearm. In this cross-sectional study, regression analyses control for differences in geography (e.g., proximity to population in states with weak or strict gun laws), demographic differences in populations, and crime rates. Preliminary analyses indicate the most comprehensive sets of gun laws are both negatively associated with diversion of guns to criminals and likelihood that violent crimes involve the use of a firearm. Measures of the diversion of guns to criminals based on crime gun trace data were positively associated with gun availability to criminals.

2016 - American Society of Criminology – 72nd Annual Meeting Words: 194 words || 
Info
2. Lynch, Kellie. "They Won’t Lay Down Their Bible or Their Guns: Implementing Domestic Violence Gun Policies in a Rural State with No Domestic Violence Gun Laws" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Criminology – 72nd Annual Meeting, Hilton New Orleans Riverside, New Orleans, LA, Nov 16, 2016 <Not Available>. 2019-10-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1146934_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Though federal law prohibits domestic violence perpetrators from possessing a firearm, many states do not have statewide laws that prohibit non-felon perpetrators from possessing firearms. In the absence of such state laws, some communities implement gun confiscation of domestic violence perpetrators at the local court level. The present study investigated why communities that differ in culture and resources engage in procedures that mandate gun confiscation as part of a protective order. Interviews were conducted with key community professionals (N = 133) who work both in victim services and the justice system from urban and rural, Appalachian communities in a single state that has no specific domestic violence gun laws. The results revealed the following contributing factors as to why rural communities were less likely to implement gun confiscation policies: lower perceived risk of intimate partner gun violence/homicide in the community, lower perceived effectiveness of the gun confiscation policy, more barriers to enforcing the policy, increased hunting and gun culture in the community, and lower perceived community readiness to enforce the policy. The results have implications for implementing domestic violence gun laws and policies in states or communities that are resistant to enforcing gun control.

2016 - Southwestern Social Science Association 97th Annual Meeting Words: 286 words || 
Info
3. Potts, Todd. and Yerger, David. "Suicide and Non-Suicide Gun Deaths across the U.S.: the Role of Gun Ownership Rates, Gun Control Laws, and Regional Culture" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Southwestern Social Science Association 97th Annual Meeting, Paris and Bally’s Hotels, Las Vegas, Nevada, Mar 23, 2016 <Not Available>. 2019-10-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1111106_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This research explores how differences in state gun ownership rates and gun control laws in 2013 are linked to variation across states in the rates of overall firearm-related deaths, firearm suicides, non-suicide firearm deaths, all suicides, and non-firearm suicides. Unique to the existing literature, the regression analysis captures regional cultural differences via the inclusion of dummy variables corresponding to the four regions set forth by the U.S. Census Bureau (Northeast, South, Midwest, and West).

Each of the state death rates listed above are used in turn as the dependent variable in a model with state gun-ownership rates, an index variable based on state gun-control laws, and one or more regional dummy variables serving as independent variables. The regression coefficients for state gun ownership rates and gun control laws are broadly consistent with the existing literature: the dependent variables ‘all firearm deaths’ and ‘firearm suicides’ are positively related to gun ownership rates and negatively associated with more restrictive gun control laws. For the ‘non-suicide firearm deaths’ variable, however, neither gun ownership rates nor gun control laws have a statistically significant impact.

Furthermore, regression results reveal important differences in regional firearm-related deaths. Namely, even when controlling for different rates of gun ownership and differences in gun-control laws, the ‘West’ region is found to have a statistically higher rate of firearm suicides than the other regions and the ‘South’ region is found to have a statistically higher rate of all firearm-related deaths. Ongoing research will explore the robustness of the coefficients on these regional variables by adding to the base model other socio-demographic variables potentially linked to firearm-related deaths to examine whether or not their inclusion reduces the explanatory power of the regional variables.

2013 - ASC Annual Meeting Words: 130 words || 
Info
4. Kakoti, George. "People Kill Guns? Impact of Policy, Legislation, and Culture on Gun Ownership and Gun Violence Rates" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASC Annual Meeting, Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, IL, Nov 19, 2013 <Not Available>. 2019-10-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p675641_index.html>
Publication Type: Roundtable Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Following the recent Trayvon Martin and the Newtown school shootings in the South and Northeast United States respectively, there has been a renewed interest in the effect of policy, culture and particularly, statutes, on gun ownership and violence. New York and Florida are almost polar opposites in their approach to private gun ownership. Florida, a shall-issue state, adopts the premise that more guns in the hands of law abiding people prevent or minimize gun violence, and as a result its policies have encouraged the issuance of more than 1 million concealed gun carry permits. New York approaches the issue on the premise that more guns in private hands equals more gun-related violence and increased injury and death rates. The presentation discusses whether these approaches appear to influence gun violence rates.

2011 - ASC Annual Meeting Words: 197 words || 
Info
5. Copley, Lauren. "Guns in Public: Support of Gun Carrying in the United States" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASC Annual Meeting, Washington Hilton, Washington, DC, Nov 15, 2011 <Not Available>. 2019-10-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p523595_index.html>
Publication Type: Roundtable Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Public gun carrying is a current highly controversial topic in the United States with varying levels of public support. There has been found to be some public apprehension of concealed carrying in past research, but a shift has occurred in state statutes towards a more permissive stance on concealed carry permits. Between 1989 and 1998, twenty-one states enacted concealed carry statutes. As of 2010, thirty-eight states have “shall issue” statues and eight states have “may issue” statutes. Despite this shift, there has been little academic research into attitudes towards gun carrying. This research sought to determine the relationship between demographic variables and support for gun carrying based on the 1999 National Firearms Survey using OLS regression. Support for gun carrying was measured by a standardized scale of support for carrying in three public areas: restaurants, sports arenas, and college campuses (Cronbach’s alpha= .8148). The analysis uncovered no significant differences between different ethno-racial groups and support for gun carrying. Gender, political conservatism, education, and gun ownership were found to be significant predictors of support for gun carrying. These results call for further research into why individuals do and do not support gun carrying using more recent national surveys.

Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 117 - Next  Jump:

©2019 All Academic, Inc.   |   All Academic Privacy Policy