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2012 - Eighth Annual Congress of Qualitative Inquiry Words: 106 words || 
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1. Poulos, Christopher. ""Good guys, semi-good guys, and well, really bad guys . . . "" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Eighth Annual Congress of Qualitative Inquiry, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois, <Not Available>. 2018-10-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p556662_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: When I was a kid, Saturday mornings were for cartoons and Westerns--and sometimes, cartoon Westerns... In this paper, I will offer a serial reflection on the Western, from "The Man Who Shot Liberty Valence" to "Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid" to "Star Wars" to "Cowboys and Aliens"--where the heroes (and their sidekicks) of the frontier won their way through "true grit"--and sometimes, rapier wit--to save the day (or the town, or the world). I will focus my own lens on the ethos of the Western hero, as seen in the semi-comin construction of "good" vs "sort of good" vs "bas" across a range of characters.

2018 - ACJS 55th Annual Meeting Words: 99 words || 
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2. Reyes, Cassandra. "The Anthropomorphosis of Non-Human Animals as “Good Guys” and “Bad Guys” in the Media" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ACJS 55th Annual Meeting, Hilton New Orleans Riverside, New Orleans, LA, Feb 13, 2018 <Not Available>. 2018-10-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1323117_index.html>
Publication Type: Paper Presentation
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Non-human animals have been portrayed as “good guys” and “bad guys” in the media beginning most notably with Felix the Cat in 1922. Since that time, over 100 anthropomorphized animals have been shown as law enforcement officers, criminals, super heroes, and villains in television shows, cartoons, and movies. Given our bond with animals, we have placed our animal counterparts in positions that parallel humans in these positions on the small and large screen. This paper will present the preliminary findings of a content analysis being conducted during the spring 2018 semester that reviews these portrayals from 1922 to 2017.

2007 - NCA 93rd Annual Convention Pages: 33 pages || Words: 2749 words || 
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3. Baumgartel, Elaine. "Good Guys and Bad Guys: A Content Analysis of New York Times and Washington Post Coverage of the 2004 Coup d’État in Haiti" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the NCA 93rd Annual Convention, TBA, Chicago, IL, Nov 15, 2007 Online <PDF>. 2018-10-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p192231_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: The author performed a content analysis of the characterization of Haitian political factions in New York Times and Washington Post articles published prior to the coup d’état on February 29th, 2004. Jean Bertrand Aristide supporters were referred to with negatively valued terms significantly more often than opponents of the democratically elected president. Mainstream news coverage of the 2004 coup d’état privileges U.S. economic and policy interests over an accurate representation of the history of U.S./Haiti foreign relations.

2016 - ICA's 66th Annual Conference Words: 112 words || 
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4. Chan, Lik Sam. "Self-Presentations on Gay Networking Apps: Comparing American and Chinese Guys Who Meet Guys on Jack’d" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ICA's 66th Annual Conference, Hilton Fukuoka Sea Hawk, Fukuoka, Japan, Jun 07, 2016 <Not Available>. 2018-10-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1098743_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Taking profiles on networking apps as self-presentations, this study examined how guys who meet guys (GMG) presented themselves on Jack’d, a networking app tailored for GMG.
This research took a cross-cultural perspective by comparing 204 profiles from the U.S. and 204 profiles from China. The results showed that Chinese GMG tended not to show their face on Jack’d than American GMG. Chinese GMG also mentioned a fewer number of relational goals than American GMG. In terms of self-presentation strategies, Americans tended to self-promote and to ingratiate, while Chinese tended to supplicate and to intimidate. This study showed that the differences of low-/high-context culture and individualistic/collectivistic culture reflected in the GMG’s online presentations.

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