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2009 - ISA - ABRI JOINT INTERNATIONAL MEETING Words: 180 words || 
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1. Almeida, Linoberg. "Brazilians in Guyana; Guyaneses in Brazil: Identity Dilemmas and Prejudicial Issues Performing Violence against Foreigners" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ISA - ABRI JOINT INTERNATIONAL MEETING, Pontifical Catholic University, Rio de Janeiro Campus (PUC-Rio), Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Jul 22, 2009 <Not Available>. 2020-02-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p381156_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Does Brazilian international agenda care about people migrating in the Amazon? Does local politics in Roraima care about Guyanese in social risk? The main objective of this paper is to analyze how Brazilian foreign politics work, and how the decision making process itself is wrongly based on global economic aspects leaving aside internal growth, civil society, sovereignty, respect to diversity. Besides, this scenario influences Roraima, the most northern state, and Guyana, the “unknown” neighbor with a population that migrates to Brazil reaching prejudice and violence due to poverty and race in both countries. From this, concepts like Identity (Wendt, 1996), World-System (Wallerstein, 1995) and Culture (Huntington, 2000) help us discuss a way out to build a new forces composition that could bring a new political orientation putting people at first sight. Revisited political action, determinant elements like Globalization process, Migration (Guyana-Brazil/ Brazil-Guyana, here identified as the new Diaspora), the role of some international institutions, and the relevance of Brazil as a “global player” are issues to explain positive and mistaken aspects of the unstable foreign affairs performed in Northern Brazil.

2013 - 37th Annual National Council for Black Studies Words: 237 words || 
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2. Richards-Greaves, Gillian. "Emancipation Day Sunrise Service: Reinventing African Traditions and Policing Ethnic Boundaries in Guyana" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 37th Annual National Council for Black Studies, The Westin Hotel - Downtown, Indianapolis, ID, Mar 13, 2013 <Not Available>. 2020-02-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p646859_index.html>
Publication Type: Panelist Abstract
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Emancipation Day is a celebration that commemorates the end to the African Slave Trade. It is observed in former British colonies in the Caribbean, as well as in the United States and Canada. In Guyana, Emancipation Day is celebrated on August 1, and includes a plethora of performances that unfold over the course of the entire day. The central event of the day is held at the National Park, where attendees dress in colorful African attire; singers, drummers, and dancers perform their most energetic renditions of Maafa dances and other African-influenced musical renditions; and vendors sell fufu, conkee, and cuisines they regard as African in origin. However, long before the celebrations in the National Park begin, and before the sun rises, many African Guyanese gather to celebrate the Sunrise Service. In this religious setting, they give thanks to God for their freedom and to pay homage to their ancestors with food, prayers, songs, drum solos, and other ritual practices. In this essay, I will explore the parameters of ‘African’ in the African Guyanese Emancipation Day Sunrise Service. I will also discuss the ways that the Sunrise Service represents an invention of tradition (Hobsbawm & Ranger 1983), which facilitates the active construction of Africanized identities in Guyana. Ultimately, I will demonstrate how African Guyanese use the Sunrise Service to police the boundaries of their Africanness in the midst of ethnic diversity and a racialized political climate in Guyana.

2014 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 8443 words || 
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3. Bacchus, Nazreen. "Belonging and Boundaries in Little Guyana: Ethnic Enclave Interactions Among Middle Class Second-generation Indo-Guyanese Americans" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton San Francisco Union Square and Parc 55 Wyndham San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, Aug 15, 2014 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2020-02-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p725448_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Ethnic enclaves offer cultural, religious and political amenities that enable first and second-generation Americans to develop a sense of belonging as they integrate into the American mainstream. Most studies approach ethnic urban neighborhoods from a working class perspective with limited reference to how middle class immigrants use ethnic enclaves to assert their identities and advance their structural incorporation into American society. In contrast to the first wave of European migration in the late 1800s, today’s newcomers are more heterogeneous—especially in educational attainment, English-speaking ability and economic status. In this article, I address the socioeconomic, religious, cultural and political conditions that bond middle class immigrants and their adult offspring to the ethnic neighborhood by discussing how second-generation Indo-Guyanese Americans, Indian Caribbeans of Asian Indian Ancestry, use the ethnic enclave to mark ethnic boundaries and reconfigure their ethnic identities in New York. Middle class second-generation Indo-Guyanese Americans are particularly significant to this analysis in that they are residentially, culturally and politically re-developing the ethnic enclave to reflect their assimilation needs through familial and co-ethnic interactions, ethno-religious performances and political involvement in community based organizations. It is important to consider how contemporary immigrants with high educational attainment and/ or earnings are utilizing the urban enclave landscape and how structural conditions and cultural traditions are shaping the dynamic relationship between ethnic identification, boundary formation and assimilation.

2015 - 59th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society Words: 255 words || 
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4. Hershkowitz, Ann. and Bell, Brenda. "Work readiness and literacy strengthening in the Skills and Knowledge for Youth Employment Project in Guyana" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 59th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society, Washington Hilton Hotel, Washington D.C., <Not Available>. 2020-02-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p993597_index.html>
Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: The USAID-funded Skills and Knowledge for Youth Employment (SKYE) project offers education, skill-building, and employment for at-risk youth in Guyana, with the goal of reducing youth crime and violence. This four-year project provides targeted alternative sentencing, work readiness training, literacy strengthening, micro-business development, and coaching for 2,200 youth ages 15–24.
All youth who join SKYE take a 5-week work readiness course based on EDC’s Work Ready Now! curriculum that covers seven major areas: Personal Development, Interpersonal Communications, Work Habits and Conduct, Leadership, Safety and Health at Work, Rights and Responsibilities of Workers and Employers, and Basic Financial Literacy. This course was originally developed for youth with a 7th grade reading ability. However, after a year of implementation, SKYE identified a population of youth who would benefit from the program and were eager to participate, but who were ineligible because of their limited literacy skills.
In response to this need, the project developed a second work readiness course, Work Ready Plus, that includes specific literacy strengthening skills, combined with the same work readiness skills. This course is for youth with a grade 4-6 reading ability. The curriculum integrates literacy and work readiness skills so both areas are taught together. To date, 276 youth commenced the Work Ready Plus training and 260 have completed it. The project uses learner assessments within each module to gauge work readiness-related learning, and is starting to use EDC’s Out-of-School Youth Literacy Assessment (OLA) tool to measure literacy gains. Results from these assessments, as well as employer satisfaction surveys, will be shared.

2018 - MPSA Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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5. Wagner, Melissa. "Invisible Chains: Testing the Neocolonial Dependence Model against the cases of Belize and Guyana." Paper presented at the annual meeting of the MPSA Annual Conference, Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, IL, Apr 05, 2018 <Not Available>. 2020-02-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1350723_index.html>
Publication Type: Panel Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Comparative analysis of Belize and Guyana’s economies within the context of being former British colonies against five hypotheses of the Neocolonial Dependence Model, assessing if they are operating within constraints of the model after independence.

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