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2014 - International Communication Association 64th Annual Conference Words: 298 words || 
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1. Walsh, Michaela. "Parteindo la Madre: Re-Visioning Citizenship, Borders, Ideals of Mobility, and Be-Longing Among El Alberto's Hñähñu" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association 64th Annual Conference, Seattle Sheraton Hotel, Seattle, Washington, <Not Available>. 2020-02-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p709327_index.html>
Publication Type: Session Paper
Abstract: Against transnational perspectives that celebrate the relatively new influence of migrants on nation-state building projects across geographic divides, my paper problematizes ideals of mobility associated with the “transmigrant” body in relation to the Hñähñu, a subaltern, rural, indigenous community in central Mexico, who has lost approximately 80 percent of their population to undocumented migration. A tribal clause requires Hñähñu men and unmarried Hñähñu women to perform a minimum of one-year of community service to heir pueblo every eight years. This service, which guarantees Hñähñu their citizenship and its attendant privileges and protections, is for a vast majority, the sine qua non of what it means to belong to El Alberto. So strong is the sense of belonging to a place and to a people that for the last thirty years, Hñähñu have been making the journey back to El Alberto to complete this obligation, despite risks of not being able to return to the US. I explore how intensification of border security is putting new pressures on the tribal delegation of El Alberto, who must now reconsider longstanding laws that were created to preserve the integrity of their community during an era where migration wasn't as policed as it is now. My paper also considers how decisions to return to the pueblo or to remain in the US are shaping the cultural and economic topography of El Alberto, a pueblo that depends on remittances for survival. To these ends, my paper explores how ideas of citizenship among the Hñähñu are being adapted and re-imagined to accommodate a people separated by geographic divides, but for whom transnational ties to their pueblo remain strong. This component of my investigation has broad implications with respect to the longevity of a community that has “lost” the majority its members to undocumented migration.

2012 - RSA Annual Meeting Words: 149 words || 
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2. Hughes, E.. "The "Hélisennian" Monastery: Building Projects in Hélisenne de Crenne’s Angoysses douloureuses" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the RSA Annual Meeting, Grand Hyatt, Washington, DC,, <Not Available>. 2020-02-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p525936_index.html>
Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: The conclusion of Hélisenne de Crenne’s Les Angoysses douloureuses qui procedent d’amours (The Torments of Love) recounts the deathbed confession and subsequent voyage to “les champs Hélisiens” (Helysian Fields) by the eponymous protagonist Hélisenne and her lover Guénélic. Moved by this spectacle, Guenelic’s companion Quézinstra transforms from most virile and Christian knight to an adorer of all things amorous. He then aids the gods in publishing Hélisenne’s tale and reproduces the narrative on the lovers’ tomb, embracing the literary arts that he scorned throughout the novel. Quézinstra builds a chapel and his “perpetual residence” on the burial site, becoming the first “Hélisennian” monk. This paper will consider the building projects in Les Angoysses in relation to other “monumental” works, such as Olivier de La Marche’s Le Chevalier délibéré, Jean Lemaire de Belges’s Le Séjour d’Honneur, and Jean Bouchet’s Le Temple de Bonne Renommée and Jugement poetic de l’honneur femenin.

2014 - Tenth Annual Congress of Qualitative Inquiry Words: 151 words || 
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3. Monroy Velasco, Iris., Bejet, Corina., Ito Sugiyama, Emily. and González Forteza, Catalina. "Cultural Identity: Metsis a Hña Hñu zone" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Tenth Annual Congress of Qualitative Inquiry, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois, May 21, 2014 <Not Available>. 2020-02-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p719446_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The objective was to identify the cultural elements that young indigenous women of Otomi ethnicity integrate into their cultural identity. The participants were thirteen single women between 16 and 21 years old who were high school and university students. The technique used was discussion groups; participants were divided into two groups and engaged in two sessions each. In the analysis was found that cultural elements have changed in order to remain as an ethnic group and as a group of young women. Cultural identity is related to: values (respect, responsibility, honesty and non discrimination of others); in the work area, they have worked since the age of eight, and they currently support their parents with household expenses and their own needs. They have prioritized their high school and college studies while keeping their customs in order to work in an allocentric manner in the community although the school emphasizes individual work.

2014 - SASE Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: 14218 words || 
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4. Rissing, Ben. "“To H-1B or Not to H-1B?” Social Closure and Inequality in Immigrant Work Visa Approvals" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SASE Annual Conference, Northwestern University and the University of Chicago, Chicago, IL USA, Jul 10, 2014 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2020-02-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p731849_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This study examines how immigration policies, as implemented by U.S. government agents, shape migration and employment outcomes of skilled foreign nationals. Using a unique dataset, which encompasses the entire population of 1,425,101 U.S. H-1B temporary work visa requests evaluated by government agents from May 2005 to April 2010, I assess whether agents’ visa approval and denial decisions are affected by immigrants’ sending country characteristics. Through this program, government agents adjudicate a key institutional boundary: access to the American labor market, by conferring or withholding legal work authorization to potential U.S. immigrants. While no formal evaluation criteria pertains to immigrant country of origin, I nonetheless find that immigrant workers from sending countries with lower levels of economic development are less likely to receive approvals for initial U.S. employment, all else equal. Further, and in support of social closure theories, I find these differences are associated with visa evaluations that confer legal U.S. labor market access (through initial and continuing employment requests), but not labor market mobility (requests to change employers or jobs). The paper concludes by discussing the implications of these findings for theories of inequality and labor market mobility, in addition to practical considerations regarding the efficient and fair administration of U.S. immigration policy.

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