Guest  

 
Search: 
Search By: SubjectAbstractAuthorTitleFull-Text

 

Showing 1 through 5 of 13 records.
Pages: Previous - 1 2 3  - Next
2008 - International Communication Association Pages: 24 pages || Words: 6229 words || 
Info
1. Duffy, Brooke. "Candy to Beer to Network of Fear: Marketing’s Influence on Contemporary Halloween Rituals" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, TBA, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, May 21, 2008 Online <PDF>. 2019-06-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p233137_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Against the backdrop of a society where culture and commerce are tightly interwoven, it is perhaps not surprising that holidays today are widely recognized as ‘festivals of consumption.’ In recent decades, scholars have explored the commercialization of American holidays through the lenses of economics, religion, the family, the mass media, and advertising. The present study seeks to better understand the impact of this latter institution through an analysis of marketers’ role in the construction of Halloween in Postwar and modern America. I locate this analysis in a social constructionist framework which espouses that collective memories of the past are shaped by present social and institutional interests. This proves to be a particularly useful framework for conceptualizing the interplay between advertising, ritual, and society. Research underpinning this study comes from a selective sample of articles and advertisements in the advertising trade press from 1956 through 2006 as well as from data from public opinion polls and socio-histories of the holidays. The findings of this study suggest that marketers shape holiday rituals based on the needs of their companies, their industries, and their consumers. Not only do these results add a rich layer of discourse to existing literature on holiday commercialism, but they can also help us to better understand how advertisers’ seek to maintain control over our sense of time.

2010 - NCA 96th Annual Convention Words: 188 words || 
Info
2. Paine, Richard. "Tailor-Made Racism: The Confluence of Humor and Physical Space as Threads in a Nationally Marketed Halloween Costume" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the NCA 96th Annual Convention, Hilton San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, <Not Available>. 2019-06-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p420599_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: In the Fall of 2009, the “Illegal Alien Adult Costume” was briefly available for sale nationwide. It invited buyers to don a prototypical “space alien” mask, an orange prison jump suit, and carry a “green card” to assert “legal status.” The ad campaign for this costume proclaimed: “He didn't just cross a border, he crossed a galaxy! He's got his green card, but it's from another planet! Sure to get some laughs.…” Predictably, while the costume may have provoked laughter in some quarters, it provoked outrage in others. In turn, the outrage on one side provoked outrage on the other – and the battle was joined over where the line between “humor” and “racism” actually lies. This paper will draw on a variety of perspectives on both the rhetoric of humor and the rhetoric of racism in order to consider the interaction between these topics. It will examine the costume itself, the mass media coverage which the story provoked, and the comments made by “everyday readers” (web-surfers) who felt moved to respond to the stories they read about this incident.

2013 - SSSA Annual Meeting Words: 21 words || 
Info
3. Hess, Bailey. "From Proper to Perverse: The Evolution of the Halloween Costume" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SSSA Annual Meeting, New Orleans Marriott, New Orleans, Louisiana, Mar 27, 2013 <Not Available>. 2019-06-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p639580_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Photographs will be used to compare gendered costumes from the 1950s to today, noting the increasingly sexualized costumes of young females.

2012 - AWP Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: 45 words || 
Info
4. Boyd, Hope., Murnen, Sarah. and Graff, Kaitlin. "Girls’ Dolls, Halloween Costumes, and Magazine Portrayals: Further Evidence of the Cultural Sexualization of Girls" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the AWP Annual Conference, Palm Springs Hilton, Palm Springs, CA, Mar 08, 2012 Online <PDF>. 2019-06-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p550443_index.html>
Publication Type: POSTER
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: We adapted methodology used for coding the degree of sexualization of girls’ clothing to examine the degree of sexualization in other girls’ products. Sexualization was found frequently in girls’ dolls and Halloween costumes, and there was increased sexualization found across time in two girls’ magazines.

Pages: Previous - 1 2 3  - Next

©2019 All Academic, Inc.   |   All Academic Privacy Policy