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2013 - International Communication Association Pages: unavailable || Words: 10018 words || 
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1. Baruh, Lemi., Chisik, Yoram. and Bisson, Christophe. "Building Better First Impressions Through More Information: The Impact of Quantity of Information Shared on a Profile, Profile Owner’s Gender, and Profile Viewer’s Voyeuristic Curiosity on Formation of Impressions" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Hilton Metropole Hotel, London, England, Jun 17, 2013 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-10-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p637723_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper reports the results of an experiment that employed a 2 (low information vs. high information) by 2 (male profile vs. female profile) replicated design to investigate the relationship between the amount of information shared in an SNS profile and the impressions that profile viewers form about the profile owner. Study participants also completed a three-item voyeuristic curiosity scale. The results reveal that profile viewers formed more positive impressions about profiles that contained more information. This positive relationship between amount of information in a profile and impression scores was stronger for female profiles. The three-way interaction between amount of information, profile owner’s gender, and profile viewer’s voyeuristic curiosity was such that for female profiles, more information elicited a stronger increase in positive evaluations among respondents with high voyeuristic curiosity than among respondents with low voyeuristic curiosity; whereas for male profiles, more information elicited positive evaluations among profile viewers with low voyeuristic curiosity but not among profile viewers with high voyeuristic curiosity.

2002 - American Political Science Association Pages: 27 pages || Words: 10050 words || 
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2. Nelson, Thomas., Paul, Javonne., Block, Ray. and Brown-Dean, Khalilah. "Racial Profiling or Racist Profiling? : Perception and Opinion on the Profiling of Arabs and Blacks" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Boston Marriott Copley Place, Sheraton Boston & Hynes Convention Center, Boston, Massachusetts, Aug 28, 2002 <Not Available>. 2019-10-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p66083_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: We are engaged in a broad study of perceptions of racism in the criminal justice system. The present paper reports on one part of that project: attitudes toward ?racial profiling? of Blacks and ?ethnic profiling? of Arabs following the September 11th terrorist attack. We report on a series of experiments that examined college student opinions toward these two law enforcement practices, including whether or not they are perceived as racist. We examine individual predispositions that might be related to these attitudes, and conduct an experimental manipulation designed to see whether participants see parallels between racial profiling and ethnic profiling.

2008 - American Psychology - Law Society Words: 104 words || 
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3. Hackney-Hansen, Amy. and Glaser, Jack. "Ironic Effects of Racial Profiling: Increased Transgressions by the Non-Profiled Group" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Psychology - Law Society, Hyatt Regency Jacksonville Riverfront, Jacksonville, FL, Mar 05, 2008 <Not Available>. 2019-10-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p229381_index.html>
Publication Type: Poster
Abstract: Racial profiling is the use of race, ethnicity, or national origin by police to make judgments of criminal suspicion. The fairness and efficacy of this practice has been questioned by many (e.g., Glaser, 2006). This study is the first to experimentally investigate the effects of racial profiling on the behavior of others. Sixty-two white participants were randomly assigned to witness either black or white confederates being profiled for cheating during a complex cognitive task, or witnessed no profiling. Results showed that participants cheated significantly more under the black profiling condition than in either the white profiling or no-profiling control group.

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