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2007 - The American Studies Association Words: 359 words || 
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1. Hill, Robert. "A Woman is a Woman is a Woman: The Performance of Postwar Femininities in Transvertia's Visual Archive" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The American Studies Association, Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Philadelphia, PA, Oct 11, 2007 <Not Available>. 2019-10-14 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p186561_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: In 1960, Virginia Prince, a white, heterosexual, male-to-female transvestite from Los Angeles, published the first issue of an underground magazine named Transvestia, which sought to educate, entertain, and instruct heterosexually-oriented male cross-dressers. The magazine went from twenty-five initial subscribers to several hundred around the United States and the world over the twenty years of Prince’s editorship. Hundreds of men who enjoyed periodically dressing and behaving as women read Transvestia, and many also sent letters, fiction, life histories, and self-photographs to Prince for publication. In this respect, they assembled in an important cultural imaginary of their own making and became the authors of their own stories rather than the subjects of regulatory medical and stigmatizing cultural discourses. In this presentation, I examine Transvestia’s fascinating visual archive of photographic presentations of self. The hundreds of photographs that Prince published serve as visual evidence of the identity-work carried out by the readers, the raced and classed models of femininity they emulated, and the idealizations of postwar domesticity they valorized and some fetishized. In these photographs, most individuals position themselves in ultra-feminine poses inside domestic spaces. They dress in complete and respectable feminine wardrobes and enact such emblematic cultural roles as the well-bred lady, the dutiful suburban housewife, the girl-next-door, and the club woman type. As it was articulated and visualized in the pages of Transvestia, the identity-work of periodic cross-dressers speaks to complex questions at the intersection of (trans)gender politics, the politics of fantasy, feminism, and power. Many of Transvestia’s cross-dressers expressed a desire to look and act like “real women.” Their feminine personae, then, represented who they wanted to be, if only temporarily and periodically. Nevertheless, in their embodiments and performances of various postwar icons of white femininity, Transvestia’s cross-dressers undoubtedly emulated gender stereotypes during a decade of rapid social change in respect to many women’s economic and social advancement. In this paper, I intend to explore these tensions, conundrums, and complexities surrounding transvestite identity-construction as it was visualized in what may now be considered a "transgender" Cold War cultural imaginary. Finally, I consider how the visual construction of crossgender identities enriches the historiography on gender and sexuality in postwar America.

2003 - American Sociological Association Pages: 21 pages || Words: 5335 words || 
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2. Noh, Marianne. and Lo, Celia. "Medicalization of the Battered Woman: A Historical-Social Construction of the Battered Woman Syndrome" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Atlanta Hilton Hotel, Atlanta, GA, Aug 16, 2003 Online <.PDF>. 2019-10-14 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p107922_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Since the mid-1970s battered women and the battered woman syndrome (BWS) have received significant media attention and academic interest. During the past three decades the perception and treatment of battered women has swiftly and consciously changed from self-inflicting abuse seekers to victims of long-term violent spousal abuse. Much of this shift has to do with the introduction of, and extreme attention to, BWS. Current social-psychological research focuses on the impact of expert testimony of BWS on jurors and the general public. However, it is important to explore and recognize what BWS represents, and how it has re-constructed the perception of battered women who fight back against their abusive intimates. This paper takes a historical account of the introduction, development, and influence of BWS in the United States legal system, political society, and mass media, by which the paper touches upon specific individuals, organizations, and court cases dealing with BWS as valid evidence for women defendants who have killed or assaulted their abusive male intimates.

2011 - Southern Political Science Association Pages: 25 pages || Words: 5837 words || 
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3. Surzhko-Harned, Lena. "From Soviet “Super Woman” to an “Independent Woman”: Gender and Political Behavior in Ukraine" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Southern Political Science Association, Hotel InterContinental, New Orleans, Louisiana, Jan 05, 2011 Online <PDF>. 2019-10-14 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p455903_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The increased gender gap in advanced industrialized societies suggests that gender is an important predictor of voting behavior in these countries (Inglehart and Norris, 2000). Remarkably, gender is deemed to be quite unimportant in new post-Communist democracies. This paper seeks to examine the role of gender in the emerging pattern of voting behavior in Ukraine. While gender relation remained un-politicized during the communist regime, under the democratic rule gender differences should become more sharply manifested. As the safety net of social welfare guaranteed to women under the communist regime disintegrates and culturally accepted female inequality spills out unchecked into the workforce, where laws no longer guarantee equality in public sphere, one should expect to find gendering of political issues (Zhurzhenko 2001; Aidis, Welter et al. 2007). Gendered political issues should translate into realm of political. This paper examines the demand (gendered preferences) and supply (political representation) side of gender politics in Ukraine. The analysis relies on quantitative and qualitative analysis of IFES and WVS data as well as interviews of the women activists and members of political movements like FEMEN to trace gender developments from 1994-2010. The influence of social and cultural variables as predictors of gendered attitudes is also discussed.

2017 - 41st Annual National Council for Black Studies Conference Words: 226 words || 
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4. Henderson, Jordan. "Yes, I AM a Woman: How White Feminism Made Africana Womanism Necessary" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 41st Annual National Council for Black Studies Conference, Hilton Houston Post Oak, Houston, TX, Mar 08, 2017 <Not Available>. 2019-10-14 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1258870_index.html>
Publication Type: Panelist Abstract
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Throughout American history, there have been a myriad of movements designed to achieve equal rights for all citizens. Naturally, there was movement created by women to be allowed equal access and general equality in this country and it was called Feminism. The construct of Feminism as it stands today tends to ignore, erase or even rewrite the narratives of women of color, particularly Black women. This practices began during its inception when feminists fought for the abolition of enslavement but refused to allow Blacks fighting for the same cause to participate. As their platform began to develop, they used the Black experience to identify their own oppression while only selectively including the narratives of Black women who they considered to be ‘exceptional’. White feminists also encouraged complete separation from Black men and neglected to acknowledge the experiences had because of their being both Black and woman, such as forced sterilization. This paper strives to show that because of this somewhat hostile environment, Black women acted and created a movement designed by them, for them called womanism. Womanism gave a voice to the silenced and was rooted entirely in African ideals. Accusations that feminism was not inclusive of women of color has created two kinds of feminists, both of which hinder the agency of Black women, proving that the decision to create a new movement was wise.

2007 - International Studies Association 48th Annual Convention Words: 222 words || 
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5. Lobasz, Jennifer. "The Woman in Peril and the Ruined Woman: Representations of Female Gender Identity in the Iraq War" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Studies Association 48th Annual Convention, Hilton Chicago, CHICAGO, IL, USA, Feb 28, 2007 <Not Available>. 2019-10-14 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p180558_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: War is a potent site for the production and reproduction of gender identities. As Elshtain argues, ?wars destroy and bring into being men and women as particular identities by canalizing energy and giving permission to narrate.?1 This paper is concerned with the dominant messages about female gender identity that have emerged from the US?s 2003 invasion and subsequent occupation of Iraq. Specifically, I am looking at the discourse surrounding Pfc. Jessica Lynch and Pfc. Lynndie England, the female poster girls of American involvement in Iraq, and the focus of much wrangling and hand wringing over what the war has said about women. Ultimately, I argue that the predominant female gender images that were reproduced during and after the Iraq War are of the Woman in Peril (Lynch) and the Ruined Woman (England), and that these images crowded out justice feminist-style arguments that Lynch and England demonstrated that women are every bit as good and as bad as men, and are thus no less or more fit for combat and/or military service. I suggest that this occurred because the justice feminist argument for gender equality faces an already entrenched set of counter-arguments in the American discourse, while the Woman in Peril and Ruined Woman tropes are themselves deeply entrenched in the American discourse, and operate at a less explicit?and thus harder to contest?level.

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