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Showing 1 through 5 of 9,586 records.
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2016 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Words: 259 words || 
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1. Cain, Virginia. and Chinn, Juanita. "02. National Center for Health Statistics: Datasets to Identify, Understand, and Address the Population’s Health, Influences on Health, and Health Outcomes, National Center for Health Statistics" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Washington State Convention Center, Seattle, WA, <Not Available>. 2019-04-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1155205_index.html>
Publication Type: Poster
Abstract: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) is the nation’s principal health statistics agency, providing data to identify and address health issues. Data sets available from NCHS include the: National Health Interview Survey (NHIS), National Health Interview Survey-Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander Survey, National Health Interview Survey, National Care Interview Survey, National Health Interview Survey Linked Mortality File, National Health Examination and Nutrition Survey (NHANES), National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG), National Vital Statistics System including birth data, mortality data, fetal death data, linked births/infant death program, National Mortality Followback Survey, National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NAMCS), National Electronic Health Records Survey, National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey-Physician Workflow Survey, National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NHAMCS), National Hospital Care Survey, National Study of Long-Term Care Providers, National Survey of Children in Non-Parental Care, and the National Survey of the Diagnosis and Treatment of ADHD and Tourette Syndrome. Additionally, NCHS surveys can be linked to the National Death Index. These health data sets can be used to: document the health status of the U.S. population and selected subgroups; identify disparities in health status and use of health care by race/ethnicity, socio-economic status, region, and other population characteristics; document access to the health care system; monitor trends in health status and health care delivery; identify health behaviors and associated risk factors; support biomedical and health services research; provide data to support public policies and programs; evaluate the impact and effectiveness of health policies and programs and address many other research questions.

2011 - International Communication Association Pages: unavailable || Words: 8372 words || 
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2. Kim, Yong-Chan. and Wilkin, Holley. "Exploring Moderation Effects of Health Communication Opportunities on the Relationship Between Health Literacy and Health Outcomes" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, TBA, Boston, MA, May 25, 2011 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-04-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p490937_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Health literacy has been shown to affect overall health and wellness, health knowledge, and prevention and detection behaviors. This study used the 2007 Health Information National Trends Survey (HINTS) data to explore whether health communication opportunities—specifically connections to doctors and to the Internet—moderates the relationship between health literacy and health outcomes. The purpose of the current study was to examine how low interactive health literacy, access to quality interactions with health care providers and Internet use for health information interact to have influences on cancer related health beliefs, behaviors, and outcomes. We found that individuals’ own interactive health literacy and their access to quality interaction with health care providers, independently, have positive impacts on adaptive health beliefs and behaviors and desirable health outcomes. Internet use did not show significant impacts on cancer related beliefs, behaviors, or outcomes after controlling for other variables. The moderation effects of health information opportunities (i.e., health care providers and the Internet) on the relations between low interactive health literacy and cancer beliefs, behaviors, and outcomes were limited.

2007 - International Communication Association Pages: 35 pages || Words: 8709 words || 
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3. Ye, Yinjiao. "Beyond Materialism: Television News Coverage of Health Risks, Health-Risk Perceptions, Health-Related Self-Efficacy Beliefs, and Life Satisfaction" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, TBA, San Francisco, CA, May 23, 2007 Online <PDF>. 2019-04-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p171619_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Previous studies typically focused on materialism and perceptions of general others’ affluence to explain the relationship between television viewing and life satisfaction. This study extends our understanding of such a relationship by demonstrating the mediating roles of health-risk perceptions and health-related self-efficacy beliefs. Surveys were administered to 274 college students at a large Southeastern university, and the data subjected to path analyses. Results reveal that exposure to health-related television news was associated with a higher perception of health-related self-efficacy, and that perception was related to a higher degree of life satisfaction. These results suggest that health-related perceptions other than materialism-related beliefs help establish the association between television viewing and life satisfaction. Other implications are also discussed.

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