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2002 - American Political Science Association Pages: 19 pages || Words: 4451 words || 
Info
1. Nicholson-Crotty, Jill. "Healthy Democracy and Healthy Citizens: Representation and Women's Health" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Boston Marriott Copley Place, Sheraton Boston & Hynes Convention Center, Boston, Massachusetts, Aug 28, 2002 <Not Available>. 2019-06-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p66479_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Representation is a fundamental element of a health democracy. This paper examines the role of both legislative and bureaucratic representation in supporting a health citizenry. Specifically, this study argues that women are able to represent women in state legislatures as well as through their role in state health bureaucracies. This representation should result in positive health outcomes for those suffering or at risk of contracting sexually transmitted diseases such as gonorrhea. Findings indicate that an increase in female legislators in associated with an increase in female bureaucrats in managerial positions. Women managers in health bureaucracies are, in turn associated with an increase in the percent of females in professional positions in these state level bureaucracies. Finally, increased percentages of women in both managerial and professional positions are associated with improved gonorrhea rates.

2006 - Western Political Science Association Pages: 27 pages || Words: 6117 words || 
Info
2. Fiber, Pamela. and Arsneault, Shelly. "Healthy Represntation, Healthy Women? Women State Legislators and Women's Health Outcomes" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Western Political Science Association, Hyatt Regency Albuquerque, Albuquerque, New Mexico, Mar 17, 2006 <Not Available>. 2019-06-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p97743_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Feminist literature often discusses the importance of descriptive representation of women to facilitate democracy. The vital role of women in elected office is further substantiated by research that finds the representation of women’s “interests” requires a greater inclusion of women leaders in public office. Currently, a record number of women serve in elected office at the state and national levels. In 2005, 25.5 percent of state elective executive office holders, 22.6 percent of state legislators were women, and 29.7 percent of top appointed policymakers in the states were women. Furthermore, the gap between Democratic and Republican women is increasingly closing as more Republican women run and win elective office. As the ideological composition of women in office changes, research focusing on the representation of ‘women’s issues’ must be attentive to the changing definitions of women’s issues and women serving in office generally. For example, there is evidence that in states with higher percentages of women, legislatures are more attentive to women’s health issues. However, these studies typically include abortion policy as a prominent “woman’s health issue.” This is problematic for obvious reasons including the growing ideological diversity of women who serve in public office and the moral dimensions of abortion. Therefore, new measures of state provisions of women’s health, including contraceptive services, pre- and post-natal care, and testing and care of breast and cervical cancer patients may be better indicators of the relationship between women in elected office and state attention to women’s issues.
Utilizing state level data on provision of services directed towards the health of women and representation of women in the 50 states, we explore how well the new guard of women representatives serve the interests of all women. We find that states with a critical mass of women in the state legislature are more attentive and have better over health measures than states with the fewest number of women in the state legislature.

2012 - Northeastern Political Science Association Pages: unavailable || Words: 6943 words || 
Info
3. Cordingley, Christopher. "Healthy Roads, Healthy Schools: A Look Into the Effects of Transportation Infrastructure" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Northeastern Political Science Association, Omni Parker House, Boston, MA, Nov 15, 2012 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-06-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p586534_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This study examines the correlation between development of public transportation, increased access to health care, decreased absenteeism, increased secondary graduation rates, and increased workforce health and productivity. The study explores whether increased investments in public transportation in rural and urban areas will provide greater access to available local health care, hypothesizing that if access to health care is improved, school/workforce attendance and productivity will improve as well. Through an analysis of extant research and publications, this study correlates better access to health care, increased graduation rates, and higher job productivity. This study examines leading countries for transportation funding, health care access, graduation rates, and economic loss related to absenteeism and how the United States compares.

2009 - 5th National Small Farm Conference Words: 420 words || 
Info
4. Bott, Rebecca. "Healthy Lands, Healthy Horses: Program Development for Small Acreage Owners in South Dakota" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 5th National Small Farm Conference, Hilton Springfield Hotel and Prairie Capitol Convention Center, Springfield, Illinois, Sep 15, 2009 <Not Available>. 2019-06-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p395926_index.html>
Publication Type: Poster Presentation
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: P. L. Nester1, R. Salverson2, A. Harty3, M. Hubert4, D. Jager5, K. C. Olson4, R. N. Gates4, R. C. Bott6

1Meade County Cooperative Extension Service, South Dakota State University, Sturgis, SD 57785
2Harding County Cooperative Extension Service, South Dakota State University, Buffalo, SD 57720
3Haakon County Cooperative Extension Service, South Dakota State University, Philip, SD 57567
4South Dakota Cooperative Extension Service, South Dakota State University West River Ag Center, Rapid City, SD 57702
5Fall River County Cooperative Extension Service, South Dakota State University, Hot Springs, SD 57747
6South Dakota Cooperative Extension Service, South Dakota State University, Brookings, SD 57007

There has been a steady increase of small acreage land owners within the Black Hills region of South Dakota. The number of small acreages in South Dakota (1-49 acres) increased 27% from 2002 to 2007 (NASS, 2007). For many land owners in western South Dakota, horse ownership is the principal motivator for living on a small acreage. In light of this, extension personnel in western South Dakota have begun to develop program opportunities in the Black Hills region geared towards horse producers entitled “Healthy Lands, Healthy Horses: Skills for Small Acreage Success”. The initial goals of this program are to begin establishing a new small acreage audience while providing support to land owners to help improve grazing and weed management, water quality, feed purchasing decisions, and equine health. Initially two locations, Sturgis and Custer, were selected to hold identical programs. Topics discussed during each program included: maximizing grazing capacity while minimizing weed invasion, getting the best hay for your buck, and protecting water quality. Several advertising strategies were attempted to reach this new audience and the 40 resulting participants were surveyed to determine how they learned about the programs. The four forms of advertising that had the most impact for participation were direct mailings (38.5%), local horse event participation (23.1%), radio public service announcements (23.1%) and magazine ads (15.4%). Workshop participants were also surveyed for future topics of interest. Pasture management for horses ranked first (20.6%), weed control and alternative energy were second (17.7%). Other popular topics included fencing strategies, waste disposal, and native-plant landscaping. Participants suggested that workshops be held at local small acreages for a more hands on approach to education. Having information easily accessible online was also important to many participants. With these initial outcomes we hope to continue to expand the Health Lands, Healthy Horses program by addressing these topics of interest among horse owners in the Black Hills and eventually reaching small acreage owners throughout South Dakota.

2005 - American Political Science Association Pages: 27 pages || Words: 5931 words || 
Info
5. Fiber, Pamela. and Arsneault, Shelly. "Healthy Representation, Healthy Women? Female State Legislators and Women's Health Services" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Marriott Wardman Park, Omni Shoreham, Washington Hilton, Washington, DC, Sep 01, 2005 <Not Available>. 2019-06-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p41213_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Women’s presence in state legislatures offers an opportunity to raise concerns unique to women and to pose alternative perspectives, both on issues traditionally and non-traditionally associated with women. The vital role of women in elected office is further substantiated by research that finds the representation of women’s “interests” requires a greater inclusion of women leaders in public office. While most studies examine the impact of women in terms of inputs and outputs, our study offers a unique opportunity to explore the impact of women on women’s health and health care. In so doing we explore both the relationship between representation and policy issues covering women, but also on the effectiveness of these outputs on the overall health of women in the state. Our preliminary findings indicate that political variables impact substantive health policy and that, time and again, percent of women in state legislatures is an important explanatory variable.

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