Guest  

 
Search: 
Search By: SubjectAbstractAuthorTitleFull-Text

 

Showing 1 through 5 of 469 records.
Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 94 - Next  Jump:
2006 - Western Political Science Association Pages: 27 pages || Words: 6117 words || 
Info
1. Fiber, Pamela. and Arsneault, Shelly. "Healthy Represntation, Healthy Women? Women State Legislators and Women's Health Outcomes" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Western Political Science Association, Hyatt Regency Albuquerque, Albuquerque, New Mexico, Mar 17, 2006 <Not Available>. 2019-09-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p97743_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Feminist literature often discusses the importance of descriptive representation of women to facilitate democracy. The vital role of women in elected office is further substantiated by research that finds the representation of women’s “interests” requires a greater inclusion of women leaders in public office. Currently, a record number of women serve in elected office at the state and national levels. In 2005, 25.5 percent of state elective executive office holders, 22.6 percent of state legislators were women, and 29.7 percent of top appointed policymakers in the states were women. Furthermore, the gap between Democratic and Republican women is increasingly closing as more Republican women run and win elective office. As the ideological composition of women in office changes, research focusing on the representation of ‘women’s issues’ must be attentive to the changing definitions of women’s issues and women serving in office generally. For example, there is evidence that in states with higher percentages of women, legislatures are more attentive to women’s health issues. However, these studies typically include abortion policy as a prominent “woman’s health issue.” This is problematic for obvious reasons including the growing ideological diversity of women who serve in public office and the moral dimensions of abortion. Therefore, new measures of state provisions of women’s health, including contraceptive services, pre- and post-natal care, and testing and care of breast and cervical cancer patients may be better indicators of the relationship between women in elected office and state attention to women’s issues.
Utilizing state level data on provision of services directed towards the health of women and representation of women in the 50 states, we explore how well the new guard of women representatives serve the interests of all women. We find that states with a critical mass of women in the state legislature are more attentive and have better over health measures than states with the fewest number of women in the state legislature.

2012 - Northeastern Political Science Association Pages: unavailable || Words: 6943 words || 
Info
2. Cordingley, Christopher. "Healthy Roads, Healthy Schools: A Look Into the Effects of Transportation Infrastructure" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Northeastern Political Science Association, Omni Parker House, Boston, MA, Nov 15, 2012 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-09-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p586534_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This study examines the correlation between development of public transportation, increased access to health care, decreased absenteeism, increased secondary graduation rates, and increased workforce health and productivity. The study explores whether increased investments in public transportation in rural and urban areas will provide greater access to available local health care, hypothesizing that if access to health care is improved, school/workforce attendance and productivity will improve as well. Through an analysis of extant research and publications, this study correlates better access to health care, increased graduation rates, and higher job productivity. This study examines leading countries for transportation funding, health care access, graduation rates, and economic loss related to absenteeism and how the United States compares.

2005 - American Political Science Association Pages: 27 pages || Words: 5931 words || 
Info
3. Fiber, Pamela. and Arsneault, Shelly. "Healthy Representation, Healthy Women? Female State Legislators and Women's Health Services" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Marriott Wardman Park, Omni Shoreham, Washington Hilton, Washington, DC, Sep 01, 2005 <Not Available>. 2019-09-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p41213_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Women’s presence in state legislatures offers an opportunity to raise concerns unique to women and to pose alternative perspectives, both on issues traditionally and non-traditionally associated with women. The vital role of women in elected office is further substantiated by research that finds the representation of women’s “interests” requires a greater inclusion of women leaders in public office. While most studies examine the impact of women in terms of inputs and outputs, our study offers a unique opportunity to explore the impact of women on women’s health and health care. In so doing we explore both the relationship between representation and policy issues covering women, but also on the effectiveness of these outputs on the overall health of women in the state. Our preliminary findings indicate that political variables impact substantive health policy and that, time and again, percent of women in state legislatures is an important explanatory variable.

2009 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: 23 pages || Words: 8675 words || 
Info
4. Richardson, Abigail. "Becoming a Healthy Eater: Local Knowledge and Agency in the Evaluation of Healthy Eating Advice" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, Aug 08, 2009 Online <PDF>. 2019-09-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p307448_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Healthism and the risk society combine to create a context in which the desire to eat healthy has become established as a reasonable goal for individuals seeking to live better lives and the cultivation of a healthy body becomes an agentic life-long project. However, they also encourage individuals to become their own “experts” about how to eat healthy. This paper explores how individuals negotiate this tension through the results of interviews with 40 black and white women between the ages of 25 and 80. The author finds that the women engaged in a conscious evaluative process, evaluating both the content and credentials of mediated health advice. These women relied on three forms of local knowledge for this evaluation: collective, personal, and embodied knowledge. While this is evidence of agency in these women’s lives it also often culminates in the conception and enactment of a simplistic, rather than comprehensive, form of healthy eating.

2014 - International Communication Association 64th Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: 12882 words || 
Info
5. Oh, Hyun Jung. "Tell Me a Story About Healthy Snacking and I Will Follow: Comparing the Effectiveness of Self-Generated Versus Message-Induced Implementation Intentions on Promoting Healthy Snacking Habit Among College Students" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association 64th Annual Conference, Seattle Sheraton Hotel, Seattle, Washington, May 21, 2014 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-09-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p713259_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In the context of healthy snacking, the current study tests the effectiveness of combining the implementation intention intervention with mental imagery, and compares the effect of self-generated and message-induced implementation intentions on healthy snack consumption among college students. A 2 x 2 factorial design was employed to test the main and interaction effects of the II-eliciting method and motivation level, and the results (N =148) showed significant main as well as interaction effects of the II-eliciting method and motivation level on ease and vividness of mental imagery. The regression models (n = 128) showed a significant relationship between ease of mental imagery and snack consumption after controlling for habit strength. The findings suggest that communication elements can be used in the implementation intention intervention, especially when the intervention involves mental imagery and invites less motivated people.

Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 94 - Next  Jump:

©2019 All Academic, Inc.   |   All Academic Privacy Policy