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2014 - Advancing Teacher Education that Matters in Teaching, Learning, and Schooling. Pages: unavailable || Words: 758 words || 
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1. Shulsky, Debby. "Do You Hear What I Hear?: Staging Student Teachers to “Hear” Constructive Coaching" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Advancing Teacher Education that Matters in Teaching, Learning, and Schooling., Hyatt Regency St. Louis Riverfront, St. Louis, MO, Feb 14, 2014 Online <PDF>. 2019-11-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p679121_index.html>
Publication Type: Roundtable Format
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: How can we develop teacher candidates’ ability to learn from constructive feedback? This roundtable shares a professional development that explores one approach to cultivating candidates’ ability to “hear” critique.

2010 - ISME World Conference and Commission Seminars Words: 268 words || 
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2. Gearing, Phillip. "Seeing is Hearing: Hearing is Seeing" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ISME World Conference and Commission Seminars, China Conservatory of Music (CC) and Chinese National Convention Centre (CNCC), Beijing, China, Aug 01, 2010 <Not Available>. 2019-11-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p398270_index.html>
Publication Type: Workshop/Demonstration
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Regional Australian universities providing tertiary music tuition now frequently work with students whose potential is not yet as fully realized as their capital-city counterparts, requiring the lecturers and teachers to adopt methods adapted to their particular needs. Additionally, the Queensland secondary school music syllabus no longer contains aural requirements, so that students entering tertiary music study often have less background in aural perception than formerly. The purpose of this presentation is to demonstrate proven strategies for teaching concepts of aural perception for tertiary music students with little development in aural perception. This demonstration will include strategies for teaching scale formations, rhythmic perception and dictation, interval work and harmonic perception, and sight-singing and melodic perception.

Delegates will participate in interactive and physical activities utilized to promote awareness and mastery of: 1. recognition and singing of two similar scales; 2. rhythmic solmisation and chronologically rhythmic shorthand writing for rhythmic dictation; 3. awareness of target interval(s) in different musical contexts; and 4. accurate melodic perception in sight singing and dictation tasks. Activities are changed frequently during the lesson to maintain student interest, but are integrated so that understanding and mastery are promoted, along with teaching for transfer. Activities include Dalcroze-inspired movement and “mature” application of games to focus student concentration and learning in the desired skill sets. Greater opportunity is afforded to those tertiary music students, who, for a variety of reasons, have not previously been exposed to sufficient or adequate training in aural perception skills, to better equip them for their chosen profession. Following the demonstration, conference delegates in attendance will be provided with a handout listing the activities and strategies.

2015 - SRCD Biennial Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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3. Smith, Nicholas. and McMurray, Bob. "Temporal Responsiveness in Mother-Child Dialogue: A Longitudinal Study of Normal-Hearing and Hearing-Impaired Children" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SRCD Biennial Meeting, Pennsylvania Convention Center and the Philadelphia Marriott Downtown Hotel, Philadelphia, PA, Mar 19, 2015 <Not Available>. 2019-11-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p958484_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Poster
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The coordination of interpersonal timing is a critical aspect of communicative development (Jaffe & Feldstein, 1970) and is related to positive developmental outcomes in young children (Henning & Striano, 2011; Jaffe et al. 2001, Lester et al., 1985; Van Egeren et al. 2001). Hearing loss poses significant challenges to communication and children’s speech and language development (Moeller et al. 2007). However, it is unknown how hearing loss affects the interactional dynamics between mothers and children. This study examined the longitudinal development of mutual temporal responsiveness in mother-child dialogue, and how development is perturbed by hearing loss in children.
We examined 16 mother-child dyads. In eight, children had normal hearing; in the other eight, children had hearing loss remediated by hearing aids (n = 3) or cochlear implants (n = 5). All mothers had normal hearing. Samples of mother-child dialogue were obtained during free interaction at a series of intervals between 4 and 60 months of age. A total of 4,420 minutes of interaction were analyzed, containing 20,120 maternal and 20,126 child utterances. Utterance boundaries were coded manually using Praat. Maternal response latencies were extracted by calculating time in milliseconds between the end of the child’s utterance and the beginning of the mother’s response. Children’s response latencies were calculated in the same way. Latencies greater than 5 sec were assumed to be non-contingent, and excluded from the analysis.
Mothers’ and children’s responses, shown in Figure 1, were analyzed using a linear mixed effect modeling approach (LME4 in R). Child age and hearing status were included as fixed effects, with random intercepts and slope for age. Mothers’ responses were significantly related to child age (p < .0001), with latency decreasing by 15 milliseconds per month. A significant age × hearing status interaction was also found (p = .015). This was due the fact that mothers exhibited longer latencies for responses to hearing impaired children, but only at younger ages. An analysis of children’s response latency also found a significant main effect of age (p < .001), with a parallel decrease in latency of 15 milliseconds per month of child age. No significant age × hearing status interaction was found. Overall, both mothers and children became increasingly temporally responsive (shorter latencies) over the course of development, though it appears that hearing loss perturbs the mother’s coordination more than the child’s (at least at younger ages).
A subsequent analysis examined the correlation between mothers’ and children’s response latencies within dyads to test whether individual mothers and their children show a similar pattern of age-related changes. As shown in Figure 2, the average correlation across all dyads was r = .62, though the pattern of correlations was affected by hearing status, with higher correlations for normal hearing dyads (r =.70) than for hearing impaired dyads (r = .54).
These results demonstrate fine-grained (on the order of milliseconds) developmental changes in the timing of mother-child dialogue. These changes appear occur in parallel across both members of the dyad though with closer correspondence in normal hearing dyads.

2008 - The Law and Society Association Words: 142 words || 
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4. Lahav, Alexandra. "Hear the Other Side: The Dilemma of the Advocate before an Unfair Hearing" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Law and Society Association, Hilton Bonaventure, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, May 27, 2008 <Not Available>. 2019-11-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p236765_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This paper develops an analytical framework for understanding choices open to lawyers asked to advocate at an unfair hearing. The lawyer before an unfair hearing faces a moral dilemma: participate and be complicit or refuse and leave the client defenseless. In dealing with this dilemma, lawyers face four options: collective boycott, individual conscientious refusal, internal resistance (marshalling the legal avenues available within the confines of the law) and external resistance (putting the tribunal on trial in the court of public opinion). The paper develops each of these options using case studies from the controversy surrounding the Military Commissions in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba and a few other historical examples. It considers the different models of the lawyer’s role and of political responsibility imbedded in each of these options and the costs and consequences of the lawyers’ choices.

2013 - International Communication Association Pages: unavailable || Words: 10772 words || 
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5. Lash, Brittany. and Helme, Donald. "Deaf or Hearing: A Hard of Hearing Individual's Navigation Between Two Worlds" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Hilton Metropole Hotel, London, England, Jun 17, 2013 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-11-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p638977_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Identity construction and how an individual chooses to navigate or display their identity play an important role in how they communicate and interact with other individuals. One group in which identity construction and navigation is a difficult process is the hard of hearing population. This study utilizes Communication Theory of Identity and interactive interviews to gain insight into four layers of identity – personal, relational, enacted, and communal – in the hard of hearing individual. The author discusses the themes within each identity layer and the gaps present between layers along with the implications of the identified layers and gaps.

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