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2009 - International Communication Association Words: 257 words || 
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1. Pinto, Juliet. and Soruco, Gonzalo. "Keeping Up With the Martinezes: Explaining Changes in The Miami Herald coverage of Cuba and Issues of Import for the Cuban-American Community, 1959-2007" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Marriott, Chicago, IL, <Not Available>. 2020-02-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p300229_index.html>
Publication Type: Session Paper
Abstract: No other contemporary newspaper in the United States has faced such changes in its reading public as those that have confronted The Miami Herald during the past five decades. In 1960, Hispanics were only 5 percent of Dade County’s population. By the year 2000, they accounted for 57.3 percent of the population, and Cubans remaining a slight majority over other Latino groups. And as the Hispanic population within the United States continues to grow, Miami represents an important case study for understanding how forces working externally and internally to news organizations—sweeping demographic change, shifts in political power, transformations in media economics and organizational restructuring, among other hypothesized variables—can affect content. How has The Herald chosen to interpret the issues for its dramatically metamorphosing publics? How has this coverage changed over time, in terms of trends and patterns? What were the critical moments for content change? Superficially, one would expect coverage of issues of import to the nascent Cuban-American community to increase, as that group swelled both in terms of numbers and political power. But the nuances of such change deserve careful examination, something not the subject of previous scholarly research. What was happening within the organization, at the same time massive changes were occurring in the greater Miami area? This paper presents a content analysis of Herald coverage of Cuba, Cubans, and issues of import to the Cuban community, from 1959-2007 in order to present an instance of institutional and organizational transformation that can serve in comparison as other communities continue to experience change.

2012 - RSA Annual Meeting Words: 145 words || 
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2. Melsaeter, Torgeir. "Strategies in the Display of Papal Para-Heraldic Signs in Early Modern Rome" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the RSA Annual Meeting, Grand Hyatt, Washington, DC,, <Not Available>. 2020-02-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p524875_index.html>
Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: The symbols of the papal coats of arms played an important role in early modern Rome in order to send messages that could support the pope and his family in building up their power in the local-dynastic, regional-political, and universal-religious levels. Simultaneously these visual elements were appropriated by people outside of the papal-familial circle and used for sending positive or negative messages in order to either gain the grace of their owners, or to harm them. Papal (para-)heraldic symbols could be connected to the representation of the pope and his family. They were the most personal symbols of their owners and therefore unique instruments for sending messages. The dynamic character of these signs enabled their successful integration, both visual and written, into several media of art, architecture, and literature. The display of (para-)heraldic elements was never coincidental, however, and followed precise and carefully scripted strategies.

2009 - Midwest Political Science Association 67th Annual National Conference Pages: 28 pages || Words: 7223 words || 
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3. Adhia, Nimish. "Bourgeois Virtues in Indian Movies: How Bollywood heralded India's Economic Liberalization" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Midwest Political Science Association 67th Annual National Conference, The Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, IL, Apr 02, 2009 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2020-02-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p363765_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: India’s new growth rate of 6%, I argue, was caused by a change in the ethical evaluation of wealth. Indians used to consider commerce and profit to be anti-social, and implemented economic policies that stifled private enterprise. Since 1980s, they have come to consider rich businessmen as heroes, and profits as just, and so new policies have allowed a greater play to the market. The ideological change does a better job of explaining the change in India’s economic policies than does the rational self-interest of policymakers. There was no economic crisis, nor a change in balance of power among special interests. But what changed was what Deirdre McCloskey calls the "Rhetoric of the Economy"- what influential people are saying about business and commerce. Greed is Good, or Profit is Dirty? Such Rhetoric shapes collective notions of justice and the greater good, which, even economists now agree, greatly affect policy outcomes. I do content analysis, a method borrowed from Film Studies, of the most popular Indian movie each year since 1955, and find that characters of rich merchants have gone from being villanized to being valorized. No wonder then that India's top marginal tax rate has gone from 97% in 1970 to 40% today.

2012 - RSA Annual Meeting Words: 145 words || 
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4. Thiry, Steven. ""Touched in her honour": Mary Stuart, the Elizabethan Throne, and Heraldic Usurpation" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the RSA Annual Meeting, Grand Hyatt, Washington, DC,, <Not Available>. 2020-02-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p524873_index.html>
Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: The importance of symbolic imagery in the construction of rulers’ authority is well known. This paper argues that the regal heraldic patrimony was the best instrument to visualize the abstract idea of the state or the "political body." As a result, early modern rulers were anxious to safeguard a monopoly on their heraldic imagery. The usurpation of armorial bearings undermined the very essence of one’s political rule. This is best illustrated by the case of the usurpation of the arms of England in the name of the French dauphin and Mary, Queen of Scots. Assuming the English royal style and arms in public ritual and daily politics unleashed a diplomatic controversy that stood in a long tradition of rival claims and heraldic appropriation. The heraldic charge was one of the main causes that brought France and the Elizabethan state again to the brink of war.

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