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2010 - NCA 96th Annual Convention Pages: unavailable || Words: 8938 words || 
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1. Reed, Charles. "Hero Contra Villain Cum Hero: Bridging the Hero/Villain Discourse in Modern Superhero Films" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the NCA 96th Annual Convention, Hilton San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, Nov 13, 2010 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-09-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p417151_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Over the past decade superhero movies have challenged the traditional good-versus-evil relationship. The evolution of this discourse from mythology to traditional superhero stories to the new anti-hero/anti-villain dynamic is explored and then tested through a three-pronged case study of recent superhero films: The X-Men (2000), The Dark Knight (2008), and Watchmen (2009). This study shows how the roles of heroism and villainy in media have become blurred in an age of postmodernism.

2006 - International Communication Association Pages: 25 pages || Words: 8578 words || 
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2. Xiao, Xiaosui. "A Hero Story without Heroes: The Hong Kong Government's Narratives on SARS" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Dresden International Congress Centre, Dresden, Germany, Online <PDF>. 2019-09-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p91907_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This essay addresses a significant question in crisis communication: how should a government perform its role as the official “public narrator” in times of grave disaster? In particular, how should it report its own course of action during and after the crisis? These questions proved to be especially pressing in the case of Hong Kong during the SARS outbreak in 2003. The Hong Kong government chose to provide the public with daily reports that highlighted the scientific basis of its every step towards a reasonable solution to the crisis. However, in addition to receiving scientifically circumspect information, the public also urgently needed action on the part of the government that could generate stories of bold leadership, bravery in the face of adversity, and heroic accomplishments along the way to the final triumph over SARS. Such narratives were not forthcoming from Hong Kong’s official public narrators. Accordingly, this essay examines the government’s public pronouncements during the SARS crisis and finds that they failed to provide effective hero narratives to unite the people and stimulate their fighting spirit during the epidemic.

2010 - International Communication Association Pages: unavailable || Words: 8428 words || 
Info
3. Lacy, Michael. and Haspel, Kathleen. "Fallen Heroes: The Recovery of White Western Heroes" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Suntec Singapore International Convention & Exhibition Centre, Suntec City, Singapore, Jun 21, 2010 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-09-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p405442_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Fallen Heroes: The Recovery of White Western Heroes
in Hurricane Katrina’s Aftermath

This essay exposes the narrative constructions of limited, failed or fallen heroes in major news discourse during Hurricane Katrina’s aftermath. Specifically, the major press coverage of Hurricane Katrina’s aftermath produced three types of limited or failed heroes: (1) civil servant heroes, in which the media lionized white rescue workers and National Guardsmen for saving individual New Orleaneans; (2) absolution, in which the media featured officials’ statements absolving themselves for not saving the hurricane victims, based on anonymous reports of gunfire from dangerous looters; and (3) failed institutional leaders, in which the media depicted Bush adminstration as ignorant, diverted after 9/11, or racist and classist. Such narrative constructions express fears that our democratic institutions and leaders will not save us in times of trial, and our sacred Western heroes are relics of a time gone by.

2005 - International Communication Association Pages: 25 pages || Words: 7483 words || 
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4. Leverette, Marc. "Television Myth and the Diachronic Cultural Hero: Wrestling with Wrestling" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Sheraton New York, New York City, NY, Online <PDF>. 2019-09-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p12204_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This essay examines the concepts of myth and ritual and their relation to the world of wrestling and offers an overview of the wrestler as hero in contemporary culture. Of particular interest here is the finding of working definitions of myth and hero in the modern age of electronic media and how they can be applied to popular culture texts.

2007 - International Communication Association Pages: 33 pages || Words: 8905 words || 
Info
5. Wilkins, Karin. "Conquering Evil: Interpretations of Ethnicity in Action-Adventure Heroes and Villains" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, TBA, San Francisco, CA, May 23, 2007 Online <PDF>. 2019-09-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p170634_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: American culture maintains a preoccupation with the idea of conquering evil, in the form of news and popular narratives as well as foreign policy objectives. The framework of this conquest implies an identified evil villain, who can be vanquished through the righteous acts of transcendent heroes. The articulation of ethnicity, intersecting with nationality, religious affiliation and gender, accentuates critical markers of difference within these texts. How different communities come to understand and engage these texts needs to be examined. This study explores how Arab American and other audiences interpret heroes and villains in action-adventure film through focus group research.

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