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2009 - UCEA Annual Convention Pages: unavailable || Words: 1429 words || 
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1. Reyes, Augustina. and Rodriguez, Linda. "Turnaround Schools: A Case Study of Turning Around a Low-performing, High-Poverty, High-Hispanic School into a High-Performance" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the UCEA Annual Convention, Anaheim Marriott, Anaheim, California, Nov 19, 2009 Online <PDF>. 2019-05-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p378690_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The purpose of this research was to explore the leadership practices of a principal who turned around a low-performing school from the lowest state performance level to the highest performance level to determine what guided practices. The school had a 96% high-poverty, 96% high-Hispanic, 63% high- ELL student population with a significant number of immigrant children. The results indicated that the principal’s practices had a clear understanding on his traditional professional knowledge, skills, and experiences.

2011 - UCEA Annual Convention Words: 332 words || 
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2. Welton, Anjalé. "Student Voices Contextualize the Realities of Integrated Versus High Poverty, High Minority High Schools" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the UCEA Annual Convention, Westin Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, <Not Available>. 2019-05-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p522948_index.html>
Publication Type: Symposium Paper
Abstract: Robert, a high achieving senior who set out on his educational journey as an English language learner, described the “resegregation” he experienced in his high school as a microcosm of social reproduction that is ubiquitous in the city:
Yes, the city is very polarized and I feel like maybe that’s an effect that Brown High School is undertaking because it’s such a big school that covers such a wide area of people, so I mean, you have a lot of middle schools feeding into this school. So, I feel like it’s just an effect that it has, like, can it be broken… the issues of race and demographics in my classroom? Yes. Is it easy? No.

Ironically, the school Robert describes is considered an “integrated” high school that prides itself on democratic learning. When outcomes-based research is solely considered one would conclude that such integrated schooling provides optimal educational opportunities for low-income, students of color. However, student voices better contextualize this reality (Cammarota & Romero, 2006; Lawrence-Lightfoot & Davis, 1997) by revealing how low-income students of color experience the structurally disparate opportunities to learn.
In this study, student voices from one integrated and one high-poverty/high-minority (HP/HM) non-integrated high school contextualize the ways in which learning opportunities are actually structured for students. Despite the espoused academic inclusiveness of the integrated school, the findings of this study revealed that both the integrated and HP/HM school similarly stratified access, and both struggle equally to connect low-income students of color to educational support resources. Listening to student voice enables teachers and administrators to critically examine the ways in which their policies and practices can restructure their students’ educational experiences and trajectories in such a way as to be better-received by the students. Such repositioning can also ensure that those same students are in a position to offer the additional critique necessary to preclude other repressive school policies and structures that might otherwise determine their fate… a fate that often includes not completing high school.

2016 - American Society of Criminology – 72nd Annual Meeting Words: 211 words || 
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3. Loeffler-Cobia, Jennifer. and Campie, Patricia. "Examining the readiness to adopt, implement, and disseminate evidence-based strategies in high risk-high need communities grappling with persistent violence." Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Criminology – 72nd Annual Meeting, Hilton New Orleans Riverside, New Orleans, LA, <Not Available>. 2019-05-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1149499_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Abstract: In order for an evidence-based program (EBP) to demonstrate the intended effects, implementers need to possess the right mix of attributes. Typically, this falls to the organizations that have access to the population of interest, which in the case of violence prevention would include youth-serving organizations and systems (e.g., public health, education, juvenile justice, police, and child welfare entities). Thus, implementation success depends on finding the right contextual fit between a prevention/intervention strategy and the readiness of the organizations where it is used. In high risk communities, the need for services may be high, while readiness to use services may be low. Factors that contribute to low levels of readiness include insufficient community resources, high unemployment and low-skilled labor, and low collective efficacy to prevent crime and violence from decades of historical trauma, exposure to violence, and mistrust of police and government due to disparate treatment and disproportionate involvement in the justice system. This session will explore the EBP readiness literature as it relates to effective outcomes, and present information about a new assessment tool designed to help organizations gauge their readiness and a process to support and build capacity in high risk - high need communities in the adoption, implementation, and dissemination of effective strategies to prevent or reduce violence.

2017 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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4. Love, Hannah., Cross, Jennifer., O'Connor Shelley, Tara. and Coke, Pamela. "High-Impact Forums and Activities: A new model for High-Impact Practices" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Palais des Congrès de Montréal, Montreal, Canada, Aug 12, 2017 Online <PDF>. 2019-05-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1254663_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The ultimate goal of education is to teach students to be critical thinkers who can apply what they learn to the world around them. Many institutions have implemented capstone courses to help achieve this goal. Capstone courses represent the culmination of knowledge in a student’s degree, and should be the pinnacle marker in their education. How do we know students, now alumni have adopted the knowledge from their capstone course into their everyday life? How do we know that students are actually learning? Our mixed methods research which included coding student reflections and a self-administered survey of 10-years of sociology capstone alumni revealed that not all capstone courses are producing equal long-term learning outcomes. Our research found that engaging students in public and applied sociology prepared them for their careers, engaged them in high-impact practices, and demonstrated long-term learning outcomes for alumni. Based on our findings, we have created a new high impact practices framework that should influence the design and evaluation of capstone courses.

2017 - APSA Annual Meeting & Exhibition Pages: unavailable || Words: 7958 words || 
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5. Andrews, Talbot., Delton, Andrew. and Kline, Reuben. "High Risk, High Reward: Risk Sensitive Decisions for Climate Change Mitigation" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the APSA Annual Meeting & Exhibition, TBA, San Francisco, CA, Aug 30, 2017 <Not Available>. 2019-05-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1248833_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: As the urgency of mitigating climate change rises, investment in high-risk/high-reward innovations may be crucial. Yet existing behavioral models for studying mitigation assume that investments in mitigation technology have small but certain payoffs. Thus, political science knows little about citizens’ views of risky mitigation technology. We use the collective risk social dilemma, an experimental economic game with real money at stake, to simulate investment in high-risk/high-reward technology. In our experiment, small groups of players must collectively contribute money to climate change mitigation; if they fail to contribute enough, they stand to lose all their remaining wealth. Each member must decide to contribute a small, certain investment or a variable investment with a large potential upside but an equal chance of failure. Importantly, both the certain and risky investments have equal expected value. Alternatively, players can simply defect and not contribute. Across five conditions, to manipulate the difficulty of mitigation, we vary the amount of contributions required. To predict players’ behavior, we draw on risk sensitive decision theory, which has been used for over three decades in evolutionary biology. Traditional theories, like expected value, expected utility, or prospect theory, predict decisions based on the maximization of some quantity (e.g., value, utility). The novel feature of risk sensitive theory is that it explicitly uses the variability of potential outcomes of each choice when making decisions. Risk sensitive theory uniquely predicts that, as the costs of mitigation increase, players will be more willing to make high-risk/high-reward investments. This is because at some point the high costs can only be met if a number of players in the group make risky investments which successfully pay off. Consistent with risk sensitive theory, but not with other theories, as the amount required to mitigate climate change increases we find an increased tendency to invest in high-risk/high-reward technologies. Although we study laypeople, not elites, our findings suggest that citizens may view political elite spending on risky climate technology as legitimate, so long as citizens also view the problem of climate change as sufficiently severe.

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