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2012 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 8976 words || 
Info
1. Bennett, Pamela. and Nathenson, Robert. "Hispanic-serving by Design: Characteristics of Hispanic Students Across a New Typology of Hispanic Serving Institutions" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Colorado Convention Center and Hyatt Regency, Denver, CO, Aug 16, 2012 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2020-02-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p563866_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In this paper, we seek to develop a more substantive definition of Hispanic Serving Institutions (HSIs) than is the current demographic and statistical definition used by the federal government and the academy. This work is motivated, in some ways, by the origins of and literatures on historically black colleges and tribal colleges. Those colleges are defined in substantive ways that are relevant to the experiences of their black and First Nations students. Yet, HSI's are defined by the percent (25%) of full-time enrolled students who identify as Hispanic or Latino, which may signal little about how such schools are organized or the values and principles on which they operate. In contrast, we conceptualize a substantive categorization of colleges to identify those that we call "Hispanic-serving by design" (i.e., federal HSIs that have a substantive focus on Hispanic students) in contrast to "Hispanic-serving by circumstance" (i.e., federal HSI's without a substantive focus on Hispanic students). We use data from the Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System and archival research to place HSIs in our HSBD and HSBC categories. We then use those categories to investigate whether and how the characteristics of Latino students in the Education Longitudinal Study of 2002 vary across college types. We find Hispanics to be more likely to enroll in HSI's, especially HSBD's, than Whites. As these first and second generation Latinos lack familial knowledge of the postsecondary system, they turn to their college guidance counselors, whom, in turn, steer these students towards HSI's.

2017 - American Society of Criminology Words: 165 words || 
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2. Prochaska, Brenda. "The Hispanic Paradox: A Comparison of the Relationship between Violent Crime and Four Hispanic-Origin Groups in the United States" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Criminology, Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Philadelphia, PA, Nov 15, 2017 <Not Available>. 2020-02-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1265708_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The Hispanic population has been the fastest growing population in the United States since the 1980s. According to social disorganization theory, areas with high Hispanic populations face disadvantages that might suggest these areas experience higher crime. The focus of the current study is specifically on violent crime. Some previous research has found that this may not be the case; however, the results of previous research have been mixed. This may be because not all the Hispanic people have the same country of origin. Different Hispanic groups have different experiences which may lead to different relationships to crime. The current study attempts to build on this literature by using data from the National Incident Based Reporting System and the American Community Survey to examine the relationship between the four largest Hispanic populations (Mexican, Puerto Rican, Salvadoran, and Cuban) in the United States and the violent crime rate. The results show that the relationship between Hispanic populations and the violent crime rates varies by country of origin.

2012 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 5192 words || 
Info
3. Eagle, David. "Hispanic Catholic, Hispanic Protestant: A Test of Segmented Assimilation Theory on Religious Outcomes" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Colorado Convention Center and Hyatt Regency, Denver, CO, Aug 16, 2012 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2020-02-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p565321_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Do the children and subsequent generations of Hispanic immigrants in the U.S. assimilate into the dominant pattern of religiosity? Using data from the 2006 Panel Study of American Religion and Ethnicity (PS-ARE), a nationally representative survey of the American population that explicitly oversamples ethnic minorities, this study looks at the religiosity of Hispanic Catholics and Protestants in comparison to whites and other minority groups when foreign-born status is controlled. Religiosity is measured using weekly-or-more attendance at religious services, a subjective religiosity scale and a conservative social values scale. On religious outcomes, White and Hispanic Catholics are nearly indistinguishable on measures of active and subjective religiosity. White and Hispanic Mainline and Conservative Protestants do not show differences on conservative social values within these traditions. Larger proportions of Hispanic Protestants attend religious services weekly or more. Hispanic Protestants report higher levels of subjective religiosity than whites. However, when Hispanic Protestants are compared to other ethnic minorities—Blacks and Asians—Hispanics are not discernibly different. These results lend support to the notion that minority groups within Conservative and Mainline Protestant traditions assimilate to different levels of religiosity than the white majority. However, the respondent’s particular ethnic/racial tradition does not predict the assimilation pathway. Rather, minority status, vis- ́a-vis whites, plays the determinative role.

2015 - SRCD Biennial Meeting Words: 490 words || 
Info
4. Timmons, Lisa., Pruitt, Megan. and Ekas, Naomi. "Differences in Coping, Support, and Functioning Between Hispanic and Non-Hispanic White Families Raising Children with Autism" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SRCD Biennial Meeting, Pennsylvania Convention Center and the Philadelphia Marriott Downtown Hotel, Philadelphia, PA, Mar 19, 2015 <Not Available>. 2020-02-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p958114_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Poster
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Background: The most recent prevalence rates from the CDC suggest that 1 in 68 school-aged children may have autism spectrum disorder (ASD). However, Hispanic children were less likely than black children and 50% less likely than white children to be diagnosed with ASD (CDC, 2014). Additionally, research has shown that families of Latino children obtained a diagnosis of ASD later, received fewer services, and had higher levels of needs that were not being met when compared to families of white children with ASD (Magaña et al., 2013).
While little research has examined the specific experiences of Hispanic families of children with ASD, one study did find that the majority of Hispanic parents experienced increases in religiosity or faith following their child’s diagnosis with a disability (Skinner et al., 2001). Findings from previous qualitative research suggested Latina caregivers felt there were fewer negative aspects of living with and caring for an individual with ASD in the home than white caregivers and family cohesion may play an important role in the mental health of both groups (Magaña & Smith, 2006a).

Objectives: To examine differences between coping styles, family cohesion, and social support used by Hispanic and Non-Hispanic White families of children with ASD in order to determine ways to more effectively serve and provide both populations with intervention and support services.

Method: Participants were a subset of Hispanic (n = 78) and Non-Hispanic White (n = 46) mothers taken from a larger study which consisted of parents of children with ASD between 4 and 12 years old. Self-report questionnaires were used to measure coping styles, family cohesion, and social support utilized by Hispanic families. A series of between subjects one-way ANOVAs were conducted to compare the two groups.

Results: Hispanic mothers reported significantly less support from friends when compared to Non-Hispanic White mothers, F(1, 122) = 5.99, p < .05. Hispanic mothers also reported greater use of denial, F(1 , 120) = 5.57, p < .05, and religion, F(1, 122) = 5.36, p < .05, as coping styles when compared to Non-Hispanic White mothers. Additionally, Hispanic family functioning was more enmeshed than it was for Non-Hispanic White families, F(1, 122) = 22.85 , p < .05, while Non-Hispanic White families reported more family cohesion, F(1, 122) = 4.22, p < .05. No other significant differences were found between the groups.

Conclusions: These findings suggest that ethnicity affects the coping styles, social support resources, and family functioning of families of children with ASD. These findings have important implications for service providers and policy regarding the Hispanic population. For instance, it may be helpful for public outreach groups to work with churches to raise awareness of the signs of ASD and provide intervention for families in order to better serve the Hispanic population. Also, counseling for Hispanic families may decrease the level of enmeshment their family experiences, while such counseling may not be as helpful for Non-Hispanic White families who have high levels of family cohesion.

2017 - 88th Annual SPSA Conference Words: 237 words || 
Info
5. Potochnick, Stephanie. and Stegmaier, Mary. "Another Hispanic Paradox? Political and Community Engagement across Hispanic Immigrant Generations and Citizenship Status" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 88th Annual SPSA Conference, Hyatt Regency, New Orleans, LA, Jan 11, 2017 <Not Available>. 2020-02-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1190970_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Hispanics make up 15% of the U.S. voting age population (ACS, 2015); however, many are precluded from engaging in politics, because they lack citizenship or documentation status. While non-citizen Hispanics do not have the right to vote in US elections, political engagement can occur in other forms such as participating in rallies, donating to campaigns, or writing to political leaders. Moreover, these individuals may use civic rather than political engagement as a means to promote positive change for themselves and their communities. Volunteering, community organizing, and attending community meetings are rights extended to all individuals no matter citizenship or documentation status.

Using the 2012 ANES and the complementary 2012 Latino Immigrant National Election Study, we examine Hispanic immigrant generational and citizenship status differences in political and community engagement. By combining ANES and LINES data we are able to examine these differences for first, second, third, and fourth plus generation immigrants, and most importantly, among first generation immigrants we can examine differences for citizens, non-citizens, and unauthorized immigrants.

We also test whether or not there is evidence of the “Hispanic/Immigrant Paradox”. This paradox, found in health and education research, is that first-generation immigrants have better outcomes than later generations, despite the challenges they face as immigrants. Our research suggests that in the political arena the barriers confronting first-generation immigrants, particularly non-citizens and unauthorized immigrants, may be too great to overcome even with their optimistic attitudes.

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