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2011 - ASC Annual Meeting Words: 190 words || 
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1. Belenko, Steven. and Visher, Christy. "Using Change Team Process Improvement to Enhance Implementation of HIV Services for Inmates: The HIV-STIC Project" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASC Annual Meeting, Washington Hilton, Washington, DC, <Not Available>. 2019-09-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p516379_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Prison inmates are at very high risk for HIV infection related to drug abuse and risky sex. However, many gaps exist in delivering prevention, testing, and treatment services to inmates. Prisons and jails do not generally use best practices for testing and prevention, HIV services may not be evidence-based, and there are many gaps in providing medications to HIV-infected inmates especially during the reentry period. Many of these problems reflect organizational and system barriers to implementation and organizational change. The HIV Services and Treatment Implementation in Corrections project (HIV-STIC) is testing a local change team process improvement intervention to improve the delivery of HIV services to inmates. The study incorporates a cluster randomized design involving 34 correctional facilities in 9 states randomized either a control condition receiving basic training and information about improving HIV services, or an experimental condition implementing a local change team process improvement model with demonstrated efficacy in other behavioral health settings. We present initial findings from HIV-STIC on staff attitudes toward HIV services training, attitudes and perceptions about HIV services in corrections, and staff assessment of service improvement needs at their facilities.

2012 - National Women's Studies Association Words: 95 words || 
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2. Hoppe, Trevor. "Punishing HIV: How Michigan Trial Courts Frame Criminal HIV Disclosure Cases" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the National Women's Studies Association, Oakland Marriott City Center, Oakland, CA, <Not Available>. 2019-09-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p572645_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Abstract: Sociologists have recently become interested in the use of criminal law to punish HIV-positive individuals for not disclosing their HIV-positive status before sex. Based on an analysis of transcripts form forty court cases in Michigan, I argue that these cases can ultimately be understood as a contest to frame HIV exposure as a matter for medical intervention (treatment) or legal intervention (incarceration). This analysis is the first empirical study to show how HIV disclosure cases are argued in practice. Moreover, this study demonstrates how medical problems become transformed into crime, a poorly understood social process.

2014 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 4646 words || 
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3. Badahdah, Abdallah. and Tiemann, Kathleen. "Mothering and HIV: Perceptions of HIV-Positive Women's Parental Fitness" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton San Francisco Union Square and Parc 55 Wyndham San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, Aug 15, 2014 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-09-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p724010_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In the Middle East and North African (MENA) region 40% of the people living with HIV (PLWH) are women who contracted the virus from their husbands. The majority of these women are of childbearing age. In Yemen women ages 25-34 comprised the majority of PLWH in Yemen. The purpose of this study is to understand how women living with HIV (WLWH) are perceived in relation to their parental fitness in Yemen. Data collected from 260 Yemeni undergraduate students. The study found that male students (M = 3.92, SD = .97) were more likely than female students (M = 3.09, SD = .87) to stigmatize PLWH (t (258) = 7.22, p = .000), and were more likely to perceive WLWH as unfit to parent (M = 3.78, SD = .92) than female students (M = 3.08, SD = .95) (t (258) = 6.06, p = .000). Regression analysis revealed that the best predictor of the perception of parental fitness of PWLH was AIDS-stigma attached to PLWHA (β = .61, p = .001). This is the first study from the MENA region that examined perception of HIV-positive women and their parental fitness. This study found that male students were more likely than female students to perceive WLWH as less fit to parent young children. The findings of this study demonstrated that the consequences of HIV for women in the MENA region might be far more serious and impose more restrictions on top of the already existing social and legal restrictions.

2014 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 9977 words || 
Info
4. Fleming, Paul., DiClemente, Ralph. and Barrington, Clare. "Masculinity and HIV: A Synthesis and Application of Theories of Masculinity for Understanding Men's HIV-risk Behaviors" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton San Francisco Union Square and Parc 55 Wyndham San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, Aug 15, 2014 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-09-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p726680_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Despite its biological origins, HIV/AIDS is largely shaped by social forces. Social constructions of gender norms, and those of masculinity in particularly, are key drivers of the epidemic. While the connection between masculinity and HIV-risk behaviors have been made, there is a need to integrate social science theories of masculinity with empirical research on the mechanisms by which masculinity shapes men’s behaviors. The purpose of this paper is to review the theory, evidence, and mechanisms for how men’s condom use and number of sexual partners are influenced by norms of masculinity to order to identify future directions for HIV-prevention with heterosexual men. Evidence shows that gender ideology and gender role stress are both associated with less condom use. There are three main constructs of masculinity that may limit men’s use of condoms: 1) sexual desire, 2) ability to perform sexually (losing erection/performance), and 3) bodily invulnerability (it is a woman’s concern). Each of these characteristics are associated with masculinity in most societies and men’s desire to demonstrate these characteristics may impede their condom use. Gender ideology is also associated with the number of partners a man has (more traditional ideology, higher number of partners). The relationship between masculinity and having multiple partners can primarily be explained by masculine norms encouraging men to a) have power over other men, b) have power over women, and c) have an active ‘male sex drive’. Future directions for HIV prevention are considered in light of this review.

2016 - ICA's 66th Annual Conference Words: 150 words || 
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5. Khasiani, Mercy. "Evaluating Effectiveness of Hiv Risk Communication In Kenya: A Correlation Between Construction of Meaning, Interpretation and Hiv Risk Decision Making Among Adolescents in Homabay County" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ICA's 66th Annual Conference, Hilton Fukuoka Sea Hawk, Fukuoka, Japan, <Not Available>. 2019-09-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1138228_index.html>
Publication Type: Session Paper
Abstract: Despite the fact that a lot of resources and interventions have been invested in Nyanza the anticipated decline in HIV and AIDS infections has not been achieved. The Kenya Demographic Health Survey (KDHS) of 2008/09 reveals that, Nyanza region has the highest infection prevalence in Kenya with a prevalence of 8% among the age bracket of 15-24 years compared to the national prevalence of 6.3%. The objective of this study is to find out the effectiveness of HIV risk communication messages in Kenya by assessing the impact of construction of meaning and interpretation on behaviour change with respect to sexual choices among adolescents in Homabay County. The sampling frame will be drawn from 41,885 in and out of school adolescents between the ages of 15-19 years. The study will seek theoretical support from reception theory and Cultural risk theory to understand why there is a disconnect between knowledge and practice.

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