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2012 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 6997 words || 
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1. Andrews, Abigail. "How Hometown Social Structures Shape Mexico-U.S. Migration: The Transnational Articulation of Marginality" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Colorado Convention Center and Hyatt Regency, Denver, CO, Aug 16, 2012 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-05-27 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p563941_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper explores how social structures on the sending side, at the community level, affect Mexican migrants’ occupations, locations, and settlement patterns in the United States. Although scholars have highlighted the differential impacts of receiving-end factors, as well as the variation in migration patterns over time, few differentiate between hometowns within a single sending country. In contrast, I compare cases of hometowns that migrated at similar times to show how hometown social structures shaped migrants’ 1) jobs, 2) rural/urban destinations, and 3) settlement or circularity. On one hand, “Igualdad,” a communally-organized village fostered redistribution and enabled migrants to obtain service jobs, live in urban areas, and settle permanently. In contrast, in “Disposeo,” a more hierarchical village, elites dispossessed the poorest of resources, forcing them into rural farm work, circular migration, and family separation. While rural villages may erode in the face of migration, their historical social structures have long-term implications for migrants’ economic and social marginality, compounding the effects of receiving-end factors and shaping migrants’ ongoing patterns of movement and transnational activities. These findings point to the need, I conclude, to further analyze migration and “transnationalism” in terms of the articulation between power relationships in sending and receiving sites.

2012 - ISME World Conference and Commission Seminars Words: 368 words || 
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2. ISHII, Yuri. and Shiobara, Mari. "Perception of Music of One’s Culture, Music of Our Country, and Music of Hometown" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ISME World Conference and Commission Seminars, Thessaloniki Concert Hall, Thessaloniki, Greece, Jul 15, 2012 <Not Available>. 2019-05-27 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p548055_index.html>
Publication Type: Spoken Paper (Abstract)
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In the discussion on the phenomenon of globalization, various types of cultural change are said to occur. Examples are the convergence of diverse local cultures to one universal culture, the intensification of local cultural identity, and the creation of some form of hybrid culture, or cultures, as the consequence of cultural interaction. To what extent the nation state can intervene in this process is also an interesting theme in the discussion. Musical culture is not an exception from the process of cultural globalization. The musical cultures of non-western countries have been influenced by western musical culture, while at the same time maintaining their own particular musical features. Some form of hybrid musical culture also has emerged. In order to find out what is actually happening in a non-western musical culture as a result of the globalizing process and how the nation state influences the process, this paper focuses on Thailand. In Thailand, the government attempted to combine traditional Thai music and Western music during their modernization of the 1930s, but did not use the school education system effectively for the purpose of transforming Thai musical culture. In this paper, the authors first sketch the process of cultural modernization in Thailand and discuss its features. They then introduce part of their case study from Thailand, where a questionnaire-based research project targeting Thai students was conducted in 2009. It studied Thai students for the purpose of finding out the globalization effect on Thai youths’ musical culture and the existence, or absence, of any influence related to state intervention through school music education. Thai students were asked to answer the titles of the songs they name under the terms “Thai music,” “music of our country” and “hometown music” in questionnaires. They were also asked to answer their favorite pieces or the pieces they often listen to. The results indicate that despite the attempt of cultural modernization by state in the 1930s, the lack of an effective school system to convey its intention resulted in the limited influence of state cultural policy on Thai musical culture and invited the dominance of contemporary Thai youth’s musical culture by Western-style pops.

2009 - 94th Annual Convention Words: 8 words || 
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3. Paynter, Robert. "The Neglect of DuBois in his Hometown of Great Barrington,Massachusetts..." Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 94th Annual Convention, Hilton Cincinnati Netherland Plaza, Cincinnati, Ohio, <Not Available>. 2019-05-27 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p382444_index.html>
Publication Type: Invited Paper
Abstract: ...and the Subsequent Efforts to Overcome That Neglect

2010 - American Studies Association Annual Meeting Words: 220 words || 
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4. Mueller, Monika. "New Orleans as Thanatourist Spot for Lost Souls?: Poppy Z. Brite’s Hometown Thanapolitics" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Studies Association Annual Meeting, Grand Hyatt, San Antonio, TX, <Not Available>. 2019-05-27 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p417294_index.html>
Publication Type: Internal Paper
Abstract: The earlier novels and short works by New Orleans writer Poppy Z. Brite feature New Orleans as a tourist spot for deviant thanatourists. In Lost Souls (1992), the city becomes a meeting ground for vampires in search of love, sex, rock’n roll and their own kind. A plot constructed in road movie-fashion enables the character Nothing, a young vampire unsuspectingly raised by non-vampire parents, to accomplish his search for his true identity in New Orleans. In the short story “His Mouth Will Taste of Wormwood” (1995), two jaded young men engage in grave robbing in New Orleans and the surrounding bayou country in order to furnish their Baton Rouge plantation home basement museum with grizzly artifacts that exemplify or even embody death. In Exquisite Corpse (1996), which retells the story of Jeffrey Dahmer’s grizzly cannibalistic murder spree, New Orleans becomes the perfect place for launching the abject love affair between the English mass-murderer thanatourist Andrew Compson and his Louisiana equivalent Jay Byrne.

Reading Brite’s fascination with gore and sperm as a Bataillan embrace of death and abjection, my paper will investigate why Poppy Z. Brite deems New Orleans with its long tradition of voodoo and horror the perfect setting for stories that implicate their readers in what a reviewer has aptly identified as an alluring “pornography of violence” (http://www.vamp.org/Gothic/Text/review-pzb-corpse.html).

2011 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 7274 words || 
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5. waddell, benjamin. "Reframing Mexican Patriarchy: Mapping Out the Role of Women in Mexican Hometown Associations" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Caesar's Palace, Las Vegas, NV, Aug 19, 2011 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-05-27 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p505374_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The Mexican government’s innovative program 3 X 1 para Migrantes matches investments made by Mexican hometown associations (HTAs) and in doing so, aids in the development of migrant communities throughout México. Previous research, however, demonstrates that this process is gendered. Researchers argue that male migrants tend to dominate leadership positions within the HTA structure because they long to return to patriarchal México, while women migrants prefer to settle permanently in the U.S., where social relationships are more egalitarian. I argue that hard and fast notions of Mexican patriarchy conceal important variation at the leadership level in HTAs. The results of logistic regression on data provided by the Institute for Mexicans Abroad and the U.S. Census Bureau reveal that the location of HTAs in the U.S. has a significant effect on the gender of organization leaders and contrary to previous research, the presence of the Mexican state is found to have a positive effect on the participation of women in HTAs.

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