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2007 - The American Studies Association Words: 499 words || 
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1. McCune, Jeffrey. "Is The Toilet a Grave?: Homoeroticism, Homophobia, and the Queer Politics of Black Masculinity" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The American Studies Association, Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Philadelphia, PA, Oct 11, 2007 <Not Available>. 2019-04-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p186397_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Amiri Baraka’s The Toilet (1962) may not have received as many accolades as some of Baraka’s other works, but this play is instructive in narrating the interplay of race, masculinity, and queerness. Through its interrogation of The Toilet this essay moves the play from its historic closet, opening a door for a late conversation about Baraka’s text in academic work. Furthermore, it engages the implications of artistic work where self-proclaiming “straight” black men speak in the name of “their” race, as a symbolic text for historic and contemporary racial-sexual politics whereby queer presence if negated and demonized. Through a close reading of the text, I uncover how the homosexual is often invoked for the sake of race, yet at the risk of contributing to the legacy of homophobia within black theatrical and cultural practice. I examine how The Toilet constructs black masculinity, whiteness, and homosexuality as contradictory, almost impossible, co-presences within any particular space. While this analysis focuses on how Baraka frames homosexuality, it also recognizes the more generative readings available for this text. While reading The Toilet within its 1962 historical moment reduces its radical potential, this critical interrogation pushes the texts forward into this contemporary moment—broadening the possibility for the text and its meaning. While it is largely understood as a homophobic black nationalist play, I contend that the narrative when re-read today can be understood as having more transgressive potential.

Toward these aims, this essay forges a conversation between Leo Bersani's groundbreaking essay “Is the Rectum a Grave?” and Amiri Baraka’s The Toilet. This may, at first, seem an odd pairing. However, this essay is using the metaphor of the "grave" to assess Baraka’s treatment of homosexuality and the radical potential of the text to challenge historic and contemporary performances of black masculinity. Amiri Baraka's play The Toilet uses the actual toilet as a symbolic container of the tensions created through black queer and non-queer performances of masculinity. Uniquely, this play inadvertently mirrors the relationship of African American Studies to Black Queer Studies—as the tensions between these two disciplinary locations can be found within their commitments to certain gender ideologies. Most importantly, through a close reading I outline the critical lessons we can learn from Baraka's once-controversial play. Central to this essay's discussion is the last moment in the play where the leader of a "gay bashing" returns to embrace the violated subject. This act, I argue, signals not only the potential for the leader's own homoerotic desires, but unveils the effects of masculine bravado in fueling public enactments of homophobia. The Toilet, a play ridden with masculinist and homophobic rhetoric, is as much about the disavowal of homosexuality as it is the desire for tacit black masculine ethical humanism. In other words, it is easy to assess The Toilet as a play about masculinist and homophobic violence; whereas, I argue it is necessary, but less simple, to recognize the anti-homophobic sentiments which speak to the complicated relationship between gender ideals, queerness, and racial respectability.

2005 - American Society of Criminology Words: 66 words || 
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2. Cannon, Kevin. "Homophobia in Black and White: Criminal Justice Major, Race and Anti-gay Attitudes" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Criminology, Royal York, Toronto, <Not Available>. 2019-04-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p33787_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Evidence shows that criminal justice majors and minority students hold more negative attitudes towards gays and lesbians. This study tests whether these effects also interact to shape students attitudes towards gays and lesbians. This study utilizes a sample of over 1,000 students from four univerisities in the midwest and south. The implications of these findings hold ramifications for criminal justice educators attempting to address anti-gay attitudes.

2010 - Theory vs. Policy? Connecting Scholars and Practitioners Words: 35 words || 
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3. Bosia, Michael. "Dare Not Speak: The Globalization of Homophobia in Discourse and Criminal Law" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Theory vs. Policy? Connecting Scholars and Practitioners, New Orleans Hilton Riverside Hotel, The Loews New Orleans Hotel, New Orleans, LA, Feb 17, 2010 <Not Available>. 2019-04-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p414736_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: The Louisiana law prohibiting same sex marriage might be notorious, but it’s not unique. Uganda adopted a constitutional amendment banning marriage rights, Senegalese authorities arrested AIDS activists, Poland banned gay pride, and Iran punishes sodomy

2010 - AWP Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: 878 words || 
Info
4. Geiss, Meghan., Horne, Sharon. and Dunnavant, Bridget. "A Cross-Cultural Examination of the Lesbian Internalized Homophobia Scale (LIHS) with Russian Lesbians" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the AWP Annual Conference, Portland Marriott Waterfront Downtown, Portland, OR, Feb 11, 2010 Online <PDF>. 2019-04-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p399819_index.html>
Publication Type: POSTER
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The current research explored the factorial structure and internal consistency of the Lesbian Internalized Homophobia Scale (LIHS) using Russian lesbians. The findings suggest that while there may be some common experiences among lesbians regarding identity and connection to community, there may also be cross-cultural differences in how lesbians experience their identities.

2009 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: 20 pages || Words: 7424 words || 
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5. Barton, Bernadette. "“I disown you. You are dead to me!”: Christian Fundamentalism, Homophobia and Family Life" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, Aug 08, 2009 Online <PDF>. 2019-04-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p306915_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: What is it like to grow up gay in a homophobic family? Part of a larger qualitative study exploring gay people’s experiences with fundamentalist Christianity in the Bible Belt, this paper describes some of the consequences of homophobia in families. I argue that the rejection, abuse, violence and ostracism gay youth experience from family members is best understood within a framework of child maltreatment. This abuse occurs not simply because individual families are dysfunctional and violent, but because cultural institutions – like schools and churches – support the abuse of gay youth for being gay. Parents who disown their children, and family members who ostracize gay relatives, mimic behaviors modeled in churches, schools, and the military. Thus, while an institutional official like a public school teacher, nurse or Bible study leader would not condone ostracizing, disowning, threatening, withholding love, exorcising, yelling at, hitting, and/or attacking a heterosexual child for being straight, they may turn a blind eye to, or actively participate in doing so, with a gay youth. Not only then do local officials and local institutions fail to protect gay children and adolescents from child maltreatment, in their worst manifestations, they teach homophobic families how to abuse their gay children.

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