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2014 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 7757 words || 
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1. Flatt, Michael. and Fishman, Jennifer. "Hormones Are Where It’s At: Bioidentical Hormones, Menopausal Women, and Anti-Aging Medicine" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton San Francisco Union Square and Parc 55 Wyndham San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, Aug 15, 2014 Online <PDF>. 2019-12-07 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p726610_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper examines the biomedicalization of aging through a particular lens: women seeking hormone replacement therapies (HRT) from “anti-aging” clinicians. Bioidentical hormone therapy (BHRT), the treatment most commonly on offer, requires a prescription from a physician yet remains unapproved by the FDA-- compounded in individual pharmacies outside of their purview. Within a larger study of anti-aging science and medicine, we interviewed 31 clinicians practicing “anti-aging” medicine and 25 female patients who were taking BHRT prescribed by a physician at the time of the interview. In this paper, we analyze their relationships with BHRT, menopausal symptoms, (anti-)aging, and biomedicine. What emerges is the appeal of BHRT’s unique positioning in their conception of drugs and hormones, sitting at a crucial juncture between conventional medical practices and alternative health therapies. Our analyses focus on our interviewee’s perspectives and perceptions of BHRT: their reasons for seeking out this treatment; its perceived safety and risks; and why they feel that it’s the “right” choice for them. Through a discourse about the “naturalness” of BHRT and the sense in which it is “personalized” for individual patients, interviewees present a view of BHRT that reflects the predominant anti-aging rhetoric, yet also explains on a deeper level their relationship to conventional biomedicine and its treatment of menopausal women.

2013 - 4S Annual Meeting Words: 238 words || 
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2. Geampana, Alina. "Assessing Bioidentical Hormone Replacement Therapy: Consumers as Producers of Biomedical Knowledge" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 4S Annual Meeting, Town and Country Resort and Convention Center, San Diego, California, Oct 09, 2013 <Not Available>. 2019-12-07 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p668383_index.html>
Publication Type: Paper Abstract
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In the previous century, symptoms of menopause have become increasingly medicalized and treated through various forms of hormone therapy. Recently, Bioidentical Hormone Replacement Therapy (BHRT) has been hailed as a safer alternative to synthetic hormone products due to its 'natural' qualities. However, medical practitioners are divided on the safety of BHRT. In addition, there is an increasing number of visible lay advocates of BHRT that have been producing knowledge about women, well-being, menopause, and the risks and benefits of hormonal therapies. In this paper, I argue that the dissemination of information on BHRT in the media by consumers has led not only to the magnification of the controversy regarding its safety, but also to a renegotiation of scientific knowledge and practice regarding menopausal hormone therapies. My findings also suggest that the need to reconfigure knowledge networks about hormonal therapies stems from a link to the commercial potential of BHRT and its appeal as a gendered lifestyle therapy. As such, discussions of health risks become entangled with normative ideas about gender performance. The methodology used for this paper consists of an analysis of primary sources such as articles in medical journals, press releases, online publications, videos, and interviews. This work contributes to the STS literature through emphasizing the ways in which lay media ‘experts’ and consumers are increasingly contributing to the production of knowledge about a new type of biomedical technology that thus far has been understudied.

2012 - 4S Annual Meeting Words: 249 words || 
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3. Cheng, Fei-Wen. "Obesity science, hormones, and gender" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 4S Annual Meeting, Copenhagen Business School, Frederiksberg, Denmark, Oct 17, 2012 <Not Available>. 2019-12-07 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p580137_index.html>
Publication Type: Paper Abstract
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Critical obesity studies, sociology and feminism have suggested that obesity is a socially constructed phenomenon rather than a biological disease. Before the 90s, feminist studies of issue of fat put emphasis on the subject of anorexia, popular culture and gender body politics; after the 90s, the critical obesity researchers deconstructed the myth of obesity as an epidemic disease and analyzed the political economy factors that construct the disease. This paper intends to integrate STS, feminism and fat studies in order to examine mainstream ‘obesity science’, politics of gendered body and (bio)medicalization in Taiwan. I shall adopt Oudshoorn’s research (1994) on hormone science and explore gender representation of obesity science and analyze medical textbooks. I ask: what kind of gender meanings embedded in the pathologized body of fat within medical discourses. It is argued that hormone science dominates the discourse of obesity, diagnosis and its treatments within the process of (bio)medicalization. According to medical textbooks, obesity causes hormone disorder, therefore increases androgen in fat women’s body, and makes them ‘tomboy-like’; on the other hand it causes fat men to increase estrogen, which makes them impotence and threatens their masculinity. Although there are many uncertainties in scientific researches, medical discourses of obesity science keeps emphasizing on reproductive organs about risks of losing men’s sexual capacity and women’s reproductive function in terms of motherhood. Since society blames fat women and men for their infertility, the medical intervention and individual responsibility of losing weight become the only solution in the era of (bio)medicalization.

2015 - SRCD Biennial Meeting Words: 255 words || 
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4. Chary, Mamatha., Cruz, Jayson., Bardi, Massimo. and Becker, Elizabeth. "Hormonal Effects of Paternal Care on Male and Female Offspring" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SRCD Biennial Meeting, Pennsylvania Convention Center and the Philadelphia Marriott Downtown Hotel, Philadelphia, PA, Mar 19, 2015 <Not Available>. 2019-12-07 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p959692_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Poster
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: How fathers may shape offspring development has not been well-studied in mammalian species. In California mice, a monogamous and bi-parental species, fathers and mothers provide comparable levels of care. Previous studies have shown that paternal retrieval behavior influences male offspring aggression and parenting levels by modulating levels of testosterone (T). However, it is unclear whether fathers have similar effects on female offspring. We examined the influence of paternal retrievals on T in male and female offspring. We collected trunk blood from two groups of pups, retrieved and not retrieved by either dissuading or encouraging paternal retrievals. Since previous research has shown that T rises in males after retrievals, we hypothesized that female pups would have a similar response, because females in this species are also aggressive.
Analysis of variance revealed a significant difference in T levels such that retrieved females (M= 46.90, SD = 5.33) expressed higher levels of T than non-retrieved females (M = 30.53, SD = 18.81): F (3, 56) = 4.12, p = .032 similar to male pups (retrieved- M = 58.53, SD = 19.91, non-retrieved- M = 36.54, SD = 10.71). Thus, it seems that female pups experience the same hormonal response to paternal retrievals as male pups. Since short-term surges in T during development can shape aggressive behavior later in life, it may be that females in this species learn aggressive behavior from paternal retrievals they experience as pups. This study also adds to the idea that organizational hormonal effects may occur during the once thought quiescent period of adolescence.

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