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2004 - The Law and Society Association Words: 269 words || 
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1. Hellegers, Adam. "Reforming HUD’s “One-Strike” Public Housing Evictions Through Tenant Participation" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Law and Society Association, Renaissance Hotel, Chicago, Illinois, May 27, 2004 <Not Available>. 2019-08-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p117055_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The author’s proposal is based on an analysis of the statutory undergirdings and litigative history behind HUD’s ‘one-strike’ rule, a policy which encourages local public housing authorities to empower themselves to terminate a tenancy as a result of the criminal activity of a public housing tenant, any member of such tenant’s household, or any guest or person under the tenant’s ‘control.’ Having concluded that the legislation authorizing this policy does not specify whether such tenant need even be aware of such criminal activity to trigger lease termination, and that most courts are restrained from proffering any interpretation beyond whether the strictures imposed by the policy are ‘reasonable,’ the author proposes that the residents of each local public housing authority be empowered to determine how far ‘one-strike’ should reach in their community. The article recommends that tenant-elected committees (which already exist in most public housing projects) convene to decide, within broad constitutional parameters, whether these ‘innocent’ evictions are necessary in their neighborhood, how far the policy should extend (the relationship to the criminal actor, the location of the activity, and the tenant’s knowledge of or consent to such activity) and how to divine the proper balance (if any is to be had) between community safety and civil liberty. HUD’s marketing materials and regulatory initiatives often promote self-sufficiency and citizen participation as crucial components of a stable and upwardly mobile public housing community; the ‘one-strike’ rule presents a unique opportunity to do more than offer lip service to this idea, and place this controversy into the hands of those who have the most vested interest in its resolution.

2015 - 15th Biennial Conference of the Society for Community Research and Action Words: 283 words || 
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2. Kurzban, Laura. and Kloos, Bret. "Counting Experiences for Community Change: The HUD Homeless Point in Time Count" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 15th Biennial Conference of the Society for Community Research and Action, UMass Lowell Inn & Conference Center, Lowell, MA, Jun 25, 2015 <Not Available>. 2019-08-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1034746_index.html>
Publication Type: Poster
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: How might psychologists encourage stakeholders to work with meso-systems to advocate for change? This presentation reviews a consultation position with a state coalition to conduct the Housing and Urban Development (HUD) 2014 Point in Time Count of homeless individuals. The count is required by local Continuums of Care to understand demographic characteristics of homeless individuals and make data informed decisions about allocating funding to agencies which serve the homeless. Local and regional data collected from the count is aggregated into reports that are considered in creation of local and national policies.
The Point InTime count is a regional, state-wide and national effort that requires active participation from homeless individuals, service providers, and advocates for the homeless community, as well as different types of organizations, agencies, and local and state coalitions. Using this project as an example, this presentation consider social levels and targets within local communities that can be engaged to impact how the social issue of homelessness is understood and local data can be utilized.
Several issues and examples of navigating “meso-level” community work will be deliberated such as: dealing with local perceptions and politics, increasing collaboration and communication amongst partners in different spheres, ethical considerations for data collection that is a part of a governmental agency effort, evaluating current practices, and working within systems to bolster capacity for future efforts. This presentation also considers the roles, duties and ethical obligations involved as a psychologist-in-training and consultant in such a project. Diverse skills and tools given a psychology background may be useful towards dealing with social issues through experiences in a variety of social spheres such as “alternative” internship and consultation opportunities, and interacting with different community stakeholders to positively impact communities.

2008 - ASC Annual Meeting Words: 187 words || 
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3. Cahill, Meagan., Hetrick, Samantha. and Davies, Elizabeth. "Crime Displacement and HUD's HOPE VI Initiative" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASC Annual Meeting, St. Louis Adam's Mark, St. Louis, Missouri, Nov 12, 2008 <Not Available>. 2019-08-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p269856_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: HOPE VI is a federally-funded HUD initiative that aims to eradicate severely distressed public housing and reduce concentrated poverty by redesigning the physical features of public housing, encouraging resident self-sufficiency, relocating public housing to create mixed-income neighborhoods, and using funds to leverage support from other sources. Although previous evaluations have examined HOPE VI’s effect on various social and economic factors, they have failed to specifically examine its impact on neighborhood crime, especially displacement of crime to other locations in the area. This study remedies that deficiency by examining the changing spatial patterns of crime in and around four HOPE VI sites in Washington, D.C. and two in Milwaukee, WI. This paper focuses on a comparison of the different quantitative methods used to assess crime displacement, including time series analysis, the Bowers and Johnson Weighted Displacement Quotient, and a point pattern analysis methodology. Knowledge about the most appropriate method in different contexts informs investigations of displacement in the future, and a deeper understanding of the redevelopment experiences in each site provides an overall picture of the displacement of crime from public housing redesign and redevelopment under HOPE VI.

2015 - American Studies Association Annual Meeting Words: 544 words || 
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4. Quesal, Susan. "Devastating Optimism: Landscapes of Renewal from Ida B. Wells to HUD HOPE VI" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Studies Association Annual Meeting, Sheraton Centre and Towers, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, <Not Available>. 2019-08-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1017743_index.html>
Publication Type: Internal Paper
Abstract: Susan Quesal, American Studies, UT Austin

This paper examines continuities between the Ida B. Wells Homes public housing project and subsequent HOPE VI/Oakwood Shores development in south Chicago where resurgent crime has been used to justify the erasure of the “crime scene” as a strategy for enforcing change. In both the late 1930s and again in the late 1990s, the same Bronzeville area—roughly from 37th to 39th Streets and from Cottage Grove Ave. to Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd.—experienced a level of violence -- theft, shootings, drugs -- that ignited public demand for a solution from outside. In both cases, the federal government stepped in, tearing down all existing buildings and completely rebuilding neighborhoods and dwellings. The 1940s-era federal public housing project and the 2000s-era HOPE VI both asked residents to accept the violent erasure and reconstruction of living space, rather than focusing on systemic root(s) of urban crime—specifically structural racism and economic inequality. Drawing from the visual archive, this paper maps the ideological and spatial continuities connecting early 20th century “slum clearance” with contemporary “revitalization.” In both redevelopments, not only neighborhoods but also violent crime was displaced to other parts of the city and state. Eventually, these effects (failures) were forgotten, together with the systemic root of the crime, creating the conditions for its resurgence of crime in the same area, as soon as the capitalist “optic” turned elsewhere.
This paper tracks the cycle of hope and misery characterizes at least one least hundred years of urban (re)development by placing it within Lauren Berlant’s framework of “cruel optimism,” and viewing it as an intransigent example of what Katherine McKittrick calls “plantation logic.” Berlant provides a means of understanding the American attachment to the “clean slate” as a spatial solution to endemic problems, and how this attachment becomes a hindrance to the flourishing in urban space. McKittrick’s work on plantation logic encourages us to seek out the extant “secretive histories” within oppressive systems in order to uncover already successful means of resistance to what might appear to be an inescapable totality. Putting Berlant and McKittrick into conversation with urban studies, I map the amnesia at the core of a redevelopment logic of reform by erasure. The paper ends by finding paths to freedom in other spaces. In The Black Interior, Elizabeth Alexander highlights liminal spaces where the “private” is performed in living spaces of halls, kitchens, entranceways. I conclude with two examples of interior space where intimacy has this kind of social and political meaning, one from the period of the Ida B. Wells development and another from HUD HOPE VI. Gwendolyn Brooks’ poem “Kitchenette Building” articulates, in the tension between the smell of “onion…and garbage ripening in the hall” and dreams floating up from such a space, an affirmative intimate space of living amid the demands of poverty and striving. In the 2000s, photographer Patricia Evans captured an orderly collection of hats, shoes, shoes and video tapes along the wall of one man’s lived-in Ida B. Wells apartment, before demolition, as a way of speaking back to the rupture and abandonment -- the emptying out of dwelling and neighborhood -- by the rhetoric of renewal.

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