Guest  

 
Search: 
Search By: SubjectAbstractAuthorTitleFull-Text

 

Showing 1 through 5 of 6,540 records.
Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 1308 - Next  Jump:
2007 - The Law and Society Association Words: 182 words || 
Info
1. Slotte, Pamela. "Talking about Human Rights and Human(e) Life: A Theological Ethicist Perspective on Contemporary Human Rights and Human Rights Law" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Law and Society Association, TBA, Berlin, Germany, Jul 25, 2007 <Not Available>. 2018-10-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p177814_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: In my paper I give an account for my own position as a theologian as far as contemporary human rights and human rights law is concerned. In the account for my understanding of human rights, I will, to a large extent, fall back on late modern writings in theology, philosophy and law. It will primarily be a conceptual analysis which is offered. The topic is approach as a study of language, moral and legal (and religious).
Apart from this, the analysis in the paper will include a self assessment of the own role as a researcher of theological ethics crossing so-called traditional disciplinary borders. As much of the research carried out on human rights is representative of the legal disciplines, how can – and how have – a theologian ethicist entered that predominantly legal discourse? Where does theology come in? What can be gained from the additional perspective on law, man and life? Or is it maybe even the case that human rights can be viewed as a life view to a certain extent – making it the “natural” research object for theology?

2007 - International Communication Association Pages: 28 pages || Words: 6771 words || 
Info
2. Nadorff, Pamela., Lee, Sungkyoung., Banerjee, Madhuja. and Lang, Annie. "The Human Face Specificity for Visual Processing of Human and Human-like Animal Cartoons" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, TBA, San Francisco, CA, May 23, 2007 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2018-10-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p173208_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This study investigates how individual differences in age and motivated cognition influence the processing of emotional faces. Few studies have investigated how emotion is processed in faces. And, no study that we are aware of to date in the field of communication has addressed how the emotional facial expressions of media cartoon characters are processed by children. Here we present results from a study that investigated emotional responses in children from the ages of 11-17 while they viewed pictures of the faces of human and animal cartoon characters. Results show that children do respond emotionally to emotional faces and that these responses are faster and more like adult responses for older children. In addition, emotional responses differ as a function of whether the cartoon characters are animals or humans. Responses to human faces are more predictable and faster. Responses to animal faces suggest that children have some difficulty recognizing emotion in animated animal faces ad that this difficulty is reduced with age. In addition, there is evidence that neutral animal faces receive more processing than either positive or negative animal faces.

2018 - ICA's 68th Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
Info
3. Jang, Kyungeun., Park, Namkee., Choi, Jinyoung., Cho, Seonggyeol. and Yoon, Soyeon. "Will Chatbots Be Perceived as Human Beings?: The Roles of Humanness Perception and Sense of Belonging in Human-Chatbot Interaction" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ICA's 68th Annual Conference, Hilton Prague, Prague, Czech Republic, May 22, 2018 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2018-10-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1366788_index.html>
Publication Type: Extended Abstract
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Drawing upon the CASA paradigm, the present study aims to explain and predict how artificial intelligence(AI) technologies will affect human communication behavior. With a focus on human-chatbot interaction, the present study examined a) the effects of chatbot use on humanness perception toward chatbot, b) the effects of humanness perception on continuous use intention, c) the mediation process by which chatbot use indirectly affects continuous use intention through humanness perception, and d) the moderating effect of sense of belonging on the mediation process. An online survey was conducted in South Korea (N = 645). Our findings suggest that artificial intelligence agents such as chatbots will be perceived and treated as human beings. And such perception will lead individuals to interact with the agents more frequently and continuously. Those artificial agents even might become complementary to or substitute for traditional interpersonal interaction. Specifically, individuals with poor social relations may be most likely to appreciate the artificial companion. 

2008 - NCA 94th Annual Convention Pages: 28 pages || Words: 9486 words || 
Info
4. Stec, Frank. "Human Rights Goes Global: Constituting Human Rights in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the NCA 94th Annual Convention, TBA, San Diego, CA, Nov 20, 2008 Online <PDF>. 2018-10-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p258562_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: The Universal Declaration of Human Rights emerged after the Second World War as the first truly global proclamation of human rights. This paper discusses the UDHR as a rhetorical text and examines the constitutive rhetoric that established the agency of the United Nations and the readers of the document. Understanding the origins of the document is needed to correct deceptive invocations of human rights used to justify illegal actions like torture and war.

Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 1308 - Next  Jump:

©2018 All Academic, Inc.   |   All Academic Privacy Policy