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2007 - The Law and Society Association Words: 182 words || 
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1. Slotte, Pamela. "Talking about Human Rights and Human(e) Life: A Theological Ethicist Perspective on Contemporary Human Rights and Human Rights Law" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Law and Society Association, TBA, Berlin, Germany, Jul 25, 2007 <Not Available>. 2019-11-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p177814_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: In my paper I give an account for my own position as a theologian as far as contemporary human rights and human rights law is concerned. In the account for my understanding of human rights, I will, to a large extent, fall back on late modern writings in theology, philosophy and law. It will primarily be a conceptual analysis which is offered. The topic is approach as a study of language, moral and legal (and religious).
Apart from this, the analysis in the paper will include a self assessment of the own role as a researcher of theological ethics crossing so-called traditional disciplinary borders. As much of the research carried out on human rights is representative of the legal disciplines, how can – and how have – a theologian ethicist entered that predominantly legal discourse? Where does theology come in? What can be gained from the additional perspective on law, man and life? Or is it maybe even the case that human rights can be viewed as a life view to a certain extent – making it the “natural” research object for theology?

2009 - SASE Annual Conference Words: 200 words || 
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2. Canton, Cesar. "Human Capabilities, Human Rights, and Assesment of Multinationals Impact on Human Development" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SASE Annual Conference, Sciences Po, Paris, France, Jul 16, 2009 <Not Available>. 2019-11-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p314312_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This work intends to expand our view of economic growth and HR development by shifting the scope from economic policies onto MNCs as significant non-State actors in carrying out the process of economic globalization. On the one hand, I argue that Amartya Sen’s and Martha Nussbaum’s theory of capabilities constitutes an outstanding theoretical fundament for human rights (HR), as it is entailed in Human Development Report of United Nations (2000). Since HR encompass the best approach so far to a cross-culturally common framework for human development, they are potentially open to being reinterpreted as human capabilities. On the other hand, the capabilities approach is taken as a useful tool for measuring HR development at the meso-level of international corporations. Multinational corporations (MNCs) performance in fostering (or harming) HR can be best tracked by means of capabilities operationalization in a way that allows their recognition in business operations. The contribution of this work lies in bringing the capabilities approach from its natural locus at the macro-level of economic policies down to the meso-level of business management; and in giving rise to a ‘checklist’ that MNCs can use and incorporate into their Codes of Conduct to make sure they are promoting HR.

2002 - American Political Science Association Pages: 56 pages || Words: 15794 words || 
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3. Ackerly, Brooke. "Human rights theory in women's human rights activism -- a feminist methodological approach to intra-cultural and cross-cultural universal human rights theory" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Boston Marriott Copley Place, Sheraton Boston & Hynes Convention Center, Boston, Massachusetts, Aug 28, 2002 <Not Available>. 2019-11-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p66425_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Across cultures, women's human rights have been not just violated but also unrecognized because the dominant local meaning of what it means to be a human differs with gender. Women's human rights activists and scholars have dealt with intra-cultural and cross-cultural variety in the development and use of the concept of human rights to promote the rights and development of women. They have used the examples of women's human rights violations to demonstrate the inseparability of political, civil, social, economic, and cultural rights, and they have challenged the dominant nondiscrimination human rights paradigm. I assess the effectiveness of their approaches for dealing with the problems of women's human rights recognition and violations. I offer an account of the implicit theory of women's human rights activism. Their theory is strategically effective and philosophically coherent and an appropriate alternative to foundationalist approaches to universal human rights without undermining the critical capacity of universal human rights as anti-foundationalist approaches tend to do. Informed by interdisciplinary inquiry, respectful of differences across cultures, and respectful of diversity within cultures, this activist-authored cross-cultural human rights theory supports the critical function of the concept of universal human rights and does so in a way that reminds us to be suspicious of those who might use the language of human rights to curtail the realization of some humans' rights.

2007 - International Communication Association Pages: 28 pages || Words: 6771 words || 
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4. Nadorff, Pamela., Lee, Sungkyoung., Banerjee, Madhuja. and Lang, Annie. "The Human Face Specificity for Visual Processing of Human and Human-like Animal Cartoons" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, TBA, San Francisco, CA, May 23, 2007 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-11-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p173208_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This study investigates how individual differences in age and motivated cognition influence the processing of emotional faces. Few studies have investigated how emotion is processed in faces. And, no study that we are aware of to date in the field of communication has addressed how the emotional facial expressions of media cartoon characters are processed by children. Here we present results from a study that investigated emotional responses in children from the ages of 11-17 while they viewed pictures of the faces of human and animal cartoon characters. Results show that children do respond emotionally to emotional faces and that these responses are faster and more like adult responses for older children. In addition, emotional responses differ as a function of whether the cartoon characters are animals or humans. Responses to human faces are more predictable and faster. Responses to animal faces suggest that children have some difficulty recognizing emotion in animated animal faces ad that this difficulty is reduced with age. In addition, there is evidence that neutral animal faces receive more processing than either positive or negative animal faces.

2007 - International Studies Association 48th Annual Convention Words: 187 words || 
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5. Lord, Janet. "National Human Rights Institutions and International Human Rights Implementation: New Darlings of the International Human Rights System?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Studies Association 48th Annual Convention, Hilton Chicago, CHICAGO, IL, USA, Feb 28, 2007 <Not Available>. 2019-11-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p181045_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: The exuberant establishment of national human rights institutions (NHRIs) during the past fifteen years sees NHRIs as increasingly important and engaged actors in the international human rights system. NHRIs are frequently upheld as a key component of successful national-level implementation of human rights conventions. Representatives of NHRIs are increasingly engaged as actors in their own right at international human rights convention negotiations, in some instances adopting common positions and forming their own lobbying bloc to assert, among other things, the role that NHRIs should play in national-level monitoring and implementation. Notwithstanding the heightened expectations for NHRIs in boosting national-level implementation of human rights norms, there is surprisingly little in the literature examining these new actors and whether and how they might effectively take on the role as a major force in human rights treaty implementation. This paper examines the role of NHRIs in recent international human rights treaty negotiations and analyzes the prospects for their effective engagement in national level implementation of human rights norms. In so doing, the paper presents a case study of three NHRIs engaged in implementing international human rights standards concerning vulnerable groups.

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