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2005 - International Communication Association Pages: 32 pages || Words: 7809 words || 
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1. Park, Sung-Yeon., Yun, Gi Woong., Bush Hitchon, Jacqueline. and Gunther, Albert. "Misperceiving the Norm of Ideal Thinness by Overestimating Media Effects on Others: Third-Person Effects and Pluralistic Ignorance on the Norm of Ideal Thinness" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Sheraton New York, New York City, NY, Online <PDF>. 2019-06-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p14824_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Pluralistic ignorance on the norm of ideal thinness for women, third-person perceptions about the influence of thin idealized images in mass media, and the relationship between pluralistic ignorance and the third-person perception were examined. Both women and men overestimated thinness preferred by other women and men. Men in dating relationships overestimated thinness preferred by their female dating partners, while women in dating relationships had accurate estimations of their male dating partners’ norms of ideal thinness. Both women and men also overestimated the influence of the thin ideal on other women and men. However, third-person perceptions were not found in dating relationships. When the third-person perceptions about the media effect were tested, along with people’s own norms of ideal thinness, the two variables accounted for a significant amount of variance in biased perceptions about the norm of ideal thinness.

2009 - Midwest Political Science Association 67th Annual National Conference Words: 171 words || 
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2. Garretson, Jeremiah. "Estimating Legislator Ideal Points with a Paucity of Roll Calls:_x000d_A Cosponsorship-Roll Call Hybrid Ideal Point Model of Support for Gay Civil Rights in the U.S. House" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Midwest Political Science Association 67th Annual National Conference, The Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, IL, <Not Available>. 2019-06-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p360245_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: While estimating ideal points in recent congresses is non-problematic (Poole 2005), determining support along specific issue dimensions can be difficult when only a limited number of votes are available. This is the case with votes on lesbian and gay rights in Congress. Cosponsorship data provides another manifestation of support in a policy area and early support for legislation implies greater support along a policy dimension. I merge the date a member of Congress cosponsors legislation into a standard Bayesian MCMC item response model (Clinton, Jackman, and Rivers 2004) to obtain improved policy support scores for members of Congress and compare these to the Human Rights Campaign Scorecard traditionally used as measure of support for lesbian and gay rights. The scores show a sharp consolidation of the Republican Party at an anti-gay pole after the 1992 Republican Convention and the election of a Republican congress in 1994. This suggests that Republicans used their agenda setting powers to display a unified front against gay rights in order to appeal to anti-gay religious activists.

2016 - ICA's 66th Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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3. Harrison, Millie. "The Ideal Teleworker: Assessing Ideal-Worker Constructions and Dialectical Tensions in a Nonstandard Work Arrangement" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ICA's 66th Annual Conference, Hilton Fukuoka Sea Hawk, Fukuoka, Japan, Jun 09, 2016 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-06-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1105436_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper reconceptualizes traditional assumptions of the ideal worker by examining the communicative implications of the ideal teleworker. Work-life issues concerning the intersections of personal and professional life affect men and women worldwide. Many scholars attribute the clash between organizational demands and non-work obligations to perceptions of the ideal worker, a deep-seated cultural norm in which a presumably male employee is expected to make work his chief priority. Although traditional ideal-worker norms are still prevalent and problematized in modern organizations, the rise of information and communication technologies (ICTs) and the evolution of work relationships (i.e., part-time work, virtual work, contract work, etc.) call for a re-examination of the ideal-worker norm. Thus, using three dialectics of connectivity, autonomy versus control, and flexibility versus rigidity, this paper frames the theoretical conversation by situating ideal teleworker norms through temporal and spatial perspectives.

2017 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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4. Munsch, Christin. and O'Connor, Lindsey. "Doing Ideal Work: Ideal Work as Gendered Performance" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Palais des Congrès de Montréal, Montreal, Canada, Aug 12, 2017 Online <PDF>. 2019-06-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1252522_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The ideal worker norm, which calls for perpetual availability and singular devotion to work, is deeply ingrained in contemporary workplaces. Yet, adherence to this norm is difficult for most workers. This paper presents the preliminary results of a study designed to investigate how workers manage this mismatch. Specifically, we examine the extent to which workers perform or “do” ideal work by overstating their compliance with the ideal worker norm, as well as the extent to which these performances are gendered. We present data from a controlled experimental study in which participants were asked to describe the extent to which they engaged in sixteen ideal work behaviors. Half were instructed to imagine their responses would be made public to their coworkers and supervisor; half were instructed to imagine their responses would be kept anonymous. If reports about ideal work behavior are more pronounced in public settings than in private settings, this suggests ideal work claims are self-presentational. While our findings reveal no overall effect of experimental condition, we do find important gender differences. Men who imagined their responses would be made public engaged in a number of ideal work behaviors more than men who assumed their responses would be kept private and relative to women who imagined their responses would be made public. Thus, it seems that, for men, expressed compliance with the ideal worker norm is, at least in part, a performance designed to convey a favorable social identity to others.

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