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2017 - The 13th International Congress of Qualitative Inquiry Words: 149 words || 
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1. Mfoafo-M'Carthy, Magnus. "1. Let’s talk about mental Illness: Exploring Mental Health stigma from the perspective of individuals diagnosed with the illness" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The 13th International Congress of Qualitative Inquiry, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois, May 17, 2017 <Not Available>. 2019-04-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1256283_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: According to the World Health Organization (WHO), one in four individuals would be impacted directly or indirectly by mental illness at some point in their life. Nevertheless, due to historical trends and negative stereotypes, mental illness continues to be heavily stigmatized. Although many studies have assessed the relationship between mental illness and stigma, little research has included the perspective of those living with the illness in small communities. Therefore, the primary research objective of the current study was to explore the perspectives of individuals living with mental illness, the stigma associated with it, and receiving community services. Eight in-depth, semi-structured interviews were conducted with individuals from the Waterloo region in Ontario, Canada. The findings from the study contributes to the field by improving service delivery and highlights the importance of creating a supportive environment for individuals living with mental illness to cope with the stigma associated with the illness

2015 - SRCD Biennial Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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2. Nyhof, Melanie. ""Getting ill by the wind": Cultural differences in children's understanding of illness causation" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SRCD Biennial Meeting, Pennsylvania Convention Center and the Philadelphia Marriott Downtown Hotel, Philadelphia, PA, Mar 19, 2015 <Not Available>. 2019-04-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p961954_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Poster
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In cognitive development research, vitalistic causality has been demonstrated in intuitive biological thinking in children across cultures (Inagaki & Hatano, 2002), however there is little evidence concerning vitalistic causality in children’s thinking about illness. In Traditional Chinese Medicine, health and illness are considered to rely on the flow of qi, or vital energy, in the body (Zhang & Rose, 2001). More recently, Western, allopathic medicine has established a presence in China. How do these cultural factors influence children’s understanding of the causes of illness? Zhu, Liu, & Tardif (2009) asked children and adults about the causes of illness. They found that children pointed to behavioral and symptomatic causes whereas older children and adults more often provided biological and emotional causes for illness. Building on Zhu et al’s research, 180 children in rural and urban areas of China and in the US, ages 4-10 years, and their parents were asked about the causes of illness. Children were presented with 6 vignettes that each included a sick character and two friends with different ideas of the cause of illness (contagion, vitalism, immanent justice, psychological). Children were asked to choose with which friend they agreed and if both could be right. In addition, parents were asked about health-related behaviors experienced by their children. All children chose contagion over all other possible causes, with vitalism as the second most-selected explanation. Chinese children selected vitalism more often than children in the US. The acceptance of multiple explanations for illness was dependent on age and region, with younger children and children from rural areas more open to multiple explanations. Parents in both China and the US reported similar understandings of illness causation and health-related behaviors, with parents in both countries emphasizing the importance of diet, exercise, and hygiene. However, parents in China reported more often the importance of ventilation and proper clothing for health.

2010 - American Psychology - Law Society Words: 99 words || 
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3. Darrow, Charles., Golba, Larry., Scalora, Mario. and Zimmerman, William. "Threats Against Political Figures: An Examination of Thematic Content and Approach Behavior Displayed by Mentally Ill and Non-Mentally Ill Contactors-poster" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Psychology - Law Society, Westin Bayshore Hotel, Vancouver, BC, Canada, Mar 17, 2010 <Not Available>. 2019-04-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p405884_index.html>
Publication Type: Poster
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Each year political figures receive an immense amount of correspondence, including those of a threatening nature. This study sought to differentiate between correspondence received from mentally ill and non-mentally ill contactors by examining thematic content in an effort to predict approach behavior. A sample of 4315 subjects who made threats against political figures was analyzed. The results indicated mentally ill subjects threaten less than non-mentally ill subjects and tend to incorporate personal themes as opposed to policy related themes, often communicated by non-mentally ill subjects. The implications of these findings for threat assessment activity will be discussed in detail.

2011 - American Psychology - Law Society / 4th International Congress of Psychology and Law Words: 101 words || 
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4. Sorenson Farnum, Katlyn., Blenner, Jordan., Anderson, Kristin., Hope, Deb. and Wiener, Richard. "ADA, experience with mental illness, and stigma against individuals with mental illnesses" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Psychology - Law Society / 4th International Congress of Psychology and Law, Hyatt Regency Miami, Miami, FL, Mar 02, 2011 <Not Available>. 2019-04-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p482709_index.html>
Publication Type: Poster
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Stigmatization affects those who live with mental illness in many negative ways. However, the 2008 amendments to the Americans with Disabilities Act may prohibit employers from making decisions rooted in bias against those with mental illness. Therefore, it is imperative to garner an understanding of what stigmas people hold concerning different mental illnesses. We asked participants to rate their level of disagreement or agreement to 17 dimensions concerning 3 mental illnesses (Schizophrenia, PTSD, and Bipolar Disorder) and assessed how their prior experiences with mental illness affected these ratings. Prior experience only had a limited influence on views of Bipolar Disorder.

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