Guest  

 
Search: 
Search By: SubjectAbstractAuthorTitleFull-Text

 

Showing 1 through 5 of 2,680 records.
Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 536 - Next  Jump:
2012 - RSA Annual Meeting Words: 147 words || 
Info
1. Sass, Maurice. "Magical Conceptualizations of Performative Images in the Cinquecento: “Image-justice,” “Image-medicine,” and “Image-love"" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the RSA Annual Meeting, Grand Hyatt, Washington, DC,, <Not Available>. 2019-09-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p525190_index.html>
Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: My paper will illustrate three different types of performative images of the Italian Renaissance: frescos that were used to banish the delinquent; pictures that were used to heal people from diseases via their material, iconographical, and formal characteristics; and love gifts that should evoke the love of the person desired. To achieve this aim, I will demonstrate how Renaissance scholars (e.g., Ficino, Paracelsus, Agrippa of Nettesheim, Giordano Bruno) have conceptualized these performances of images, and that the huge amount of alchemical and astrological tracts has been the base for discourses about the power of images within the “ordinary” Renaissance art theory. Furthermore, this will prove how images were thought to receive their magic power in the “era of art” no longer of the cult (legend, typology, etc.), but from hermetic knowledge that allowed the artists to instrumentalize the occult powers of nature for the production of performative images.

2017 - Annual Scientific Meeting of the International Society of Political Psychology Words: 341 words || 
Info
2. Assaf, Elias. and Campbell-Seremetis, Nicholas. "Adding Images to Image Theory: Implications on Decision-making in Foreign Policy" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Annual Scientific Meeting of the International Society of Political Psychology, The Royal College of Surgeons Edinburgh, Edinburgh, Scotland, U.K., <Not Available>. 2019-09-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1242105_index.html>
Publication Type: Paper (prepared oral presentation)
Abstract: It is said that “a picture is worth a thousand words,” but does this adage hold true in international relations? Scholars have posited that ‘images,’ or peoples’ mental construction of other actors in the international system, shape foreign policy preferences in ways that are difficult to explain through material factors alone. Yet our conception of how these images are constructed is fairly limited, and has thus far ignored the role of visual, as opposed to textual, forms of information. While previous studies have tested the effect of images on foreign policy preferences by presenting subjects with textual information about a state, we submit that this is inadequate to capture the reality of modern media. This blind-spot is problematic in an era where social media and television news alike subject people to a barrage of often visceral visuals, such as the pictures used to headline online articles or ‘blurbs.’ Much as people will form strong images of other nations based on a small amount of text with salient cues, we hypothesize that they will construct fairly complete mental images of other nations based on relatively limited visuals. Moreover, we expect that when visual and textual cues present conflicting information, for example about another state's cultural or moral standing relative to one’s own state, people will be more inclined to “believe their lying eyes.” We therefore propose a survey experiment designed to test this proposition. Considering the wide variety of visuals that can come from within the same state, people may form radically different images (and so adopt sharply different policy preferences) vis-à-vis the same state depending on the nature of the visuals to which they are exposed. We therefore randomly assign survey respondents both textual and visual cues of the same state in the form of a news article, cueing either neutral, opposed, or similar ‘images’ of that subject state. In doing so, we hope to show that visual media may play a significant, or even dominant role, in shaping the publics' images of other nations and, subsequently, their foreign policy positions.

2018 - ICA's 68th Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
Info
3. Seo, Kiwon. and Kim, Nam Young. "Does Adding Images to Texts Influence Persuasion? A Meta-Analysis of Visual Image Effects on Persuasive Texts" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ICA's 68th Annual Conference, Hilton Prague, Prague, Czech Republic, May 22, 2018 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-09-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1368238_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This meta-analysis examines whether adding images to texts influences persuasion. The literature search found 20 effect sizes with 2,452 participants. The overall effects show that additional visual images had a nonsignificant effect, r = .055, p = .161. However, when moderating variables were included, photographs (r = .077, p = .038), positive images (r = .185, p = .000), and health images (r = .105, p = .015) showed significant effects.

2004 - American Sociological Association Pages: 21 pages || Words: 8637 words || 
Info
4. Evans, Stacy. "Public Images of Scientists: Images in Film and Measures of Social Reputation" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Hilton San Francisco & Renaissance Parc 55 Hotel, San Francisco, CA,, Aug 14, 2004 Online <.PDF>. 2019-09-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p110547_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The image of the mad scientist is embedded in our culture. It is called on and used frequently in politics and popular culture. In contrast, scientists consistently rate high in prestige in social surveys. This research examines the nature of images of scientists in movies during the period 1990-1994 and compares them to survey data about scientists and the effect of scientific work. Movies represent scientists and their work as problematic and often ineffective, but surveys show a majority of people see the results of science as generally beneficial. Contrasting these two images allows a first examination of the connection between these two representations and wider societal conflicts over the role of expert knowledge and modernity.

2006 - American Sociological Association Pages: 40 pages || Words: 11343 words || 
Info
5. Granberg, Ellen. and Simons, Leslie. "Exploring a Body Image Paradox: Body Size, Family Racial Socialization, and Self-Image in African American Adolescent Girls" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Montreal Convention Center, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, Aug 11, 2006 Online <PDF>. 2019-09-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p104083_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Social psychologists have amassed a large body of work demonstrating that overweight African American women and girls feel better about themselves and have more positive attitudes about their bodies than do overweight females from other racial and ethnic groups. Substantial theoretical work has proposed that elements of African American cultural experience may contribute to these differences. In this paper, we evaluate these arguments by testing whether racial socialization within the family diminishes the influence of body size on the social self esteem of African American adolescent girls. Using a socio-economically diverse sample, we find that respondents with larger body sizes display lower social self esteem but also find that racial socialization moderates this relationship. In families where racial socialization activities are frequent, body size makes little difference in respondents’ social self esteem. In contrast, when families engage in little or no racial socialization, larger girls display significantly lower social self esteem.

Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 536 - Next  Jump:

©2019 All Academic, Inc.   |   All Academic Privacy Policy