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2012 - ISPP 35th Annual Scientific Meeting Words: 246 words || 
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1. Kuchenbrandt, Dieta., Eyssel, Friederike. and Spuling, Kristina. "Who Benefits from Imagined Intergroup Contact? Contact Experiences Moderate the Effects of Imagined Contact on Intergroup Bias" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ISPP 35th Annual Scientific Meeting, Mart Plaza, Chicago, IL, Jul 06, 2012 <Not Available>. 2019-08-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p570869_index.html>
Publication Type: Paper (prepared oral presentation)
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Imagined intergroup contact is defined as the mental simulation of a social interaction with one or more members of a social out-group (Crisp & Turner, 2009). It represents a new indirect contact strategy to reduce intergroup bias. Extending the existing literature, we investigated whether prior contact experiences with a social out-group would moderate the effects of imagined contact on intergroup bias. In Experiment 1, German participants were asked to imagine either a neutral or a positive interaction with a Turkish stranger. Results yielded that for participants low in contact experiences imagining positive (vs. neutral) contact significantly improved out-group attitudes and increased out-group trust. In contrast, participants with greater contact experiences did not benefit from imagined contact. In Experiment 2, we extended our findings focusing on a different target group that is not an ethnic out-group. Student participants were asked to imagine neutral vs. positive contact with an unknown student from secondary modern school (i.e., Hauptschule, a specific type of school that is perceived negatively in Germany). Moreover, this time we assessed intentions for future out-group contact as well as intergroup anxiety. After imagining positive contact, students indicated increased intentions for future out-group contact and reduced anxiety. In line with our hypotheses, this effect was again moderated by prior contact experiences. Positive outcomes emerged only for participants low in contact experiences. For participants with higher levels of prior contact we obtained, in tendency, the opposite pattern of results.
Theoretical and practical implications of these findings will be discussed.

2015 - ARNOVA’s 44th Annual Conference Words: 100 words || 
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2. Buffone, Anneke. "Perspective Taking and the Biopsychosocial Model of Challenge & Threat: Effects of Imagine-Self and Imagine-Other Perspective Taking on Helping" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ARNOVA’s 44th Annual Conference, Palmer House Hotel, Chicago, Illinois, <Not Available>. 2019-08-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1034420_index.html>
Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: Prior research revealed conflicting evidence showing that helping can have positive or negative health consequences for helpers (Poulin et al., 2010; Russo et al., 1995). This research investigated whether helpers may experience detrimental versus beneficial health effects depending on differences in mindset. Sampling 212 participants we found that imagine-self perspective taking (thinking how you would feel in a target’s situation) invokes cardiovascular threat (see Seery, 2013), a debilitating state of stress, while imagine-other (thinking about how the target feels) perspective taking (Batson, Early, & Salvarani, 1997) leads to cardiovascular challenge, a state of positive arousal when helping someone in need.

2011 - ISPP 34th Annual Scientific Meeting Words: 215 words || 
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3. Petersen, Michael. and Aaroe, Lene. "Imagining Politics: How Individual Differences in Imagination Shapes Public Opinion Formation" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ISPP 34th Annual Scientific Meeting, Bilgi University, Istanbul, Turkey, Jul 09, 2011 <Not Available>. 2019-08-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p510692_index.html>
Publication Type: Paper (prepared oral presentation)
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: We argue that citizens compensate for the scarcity of information in mass politics by recruiting cognitive systems designed for the internal generation of stimuli; or, in simpler terms, by use of imagination. We test this argument in the context of two nationally representative surveys of Danish and US citizens using both survey experiments and correlational analysis. Here, we provide cross-national evidence for the assertion that personality differences in imagination (cf. the IPIP inventory) influence how and how easily citizens form political attitudes. As test case we focus on the issue of social welfare. Empirically, we demonstrate that imaginative individuals hold more extreme opinions on social welfare and that this effects occurs through two pathways: First, imagination regulates how easily individuals can spontaneously generate associations about the deservingness of social welfare recipients in situations of cue scarcity. Hence, imaginative individuals list more associations about social welfare recipients in free recall tasks and are more strongly guided by their priors when reacting to thin descriptions of specific social welfare recipients. Second, imagination regulates how vividly individuals experience the available cues and associations. Hence, the emotional reactions of imaginative individuals are more strongly guided by morally-relevant associations about social welfare recipients and imaginative individuals react more strongly to morally-relevant cues in thick descriptions of specific social welfare recipients.

2014 - RSA Annual Meeting Words: 124 words || 
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4. Blanchard, W.. "Imagining the Imagined: Francesco Filelfo and Archaic Greek Mythopoesis" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the RSA Annual Meeting, New York, NY, Hilton New York, <Not Available>. 2019-08-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p673177_index.html>
Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: In Filelfo's Convivia Mediolanensia two sons of a Milanese nobleman "perform," in the manner of an ancient Greek poetic performance, some (Latin) poems to musical accompaniment. It is among the earliest reimaginings of archaic Greek paideia in the Renaissance; a later author like Ben Jonson would do something similar in his famous "Cary-Morison" ode. Filelfo also translated, in the Commentationes, a long section of an oration by Dio Chrysostom on the harmful effects of ancient paideia on political consciousness, so he clearly was familiar with the traditions and behaviors associated with poetic (or "choric") performance. In this paper I examine Filelfo's capacity to reimagine archaic Greek paideia, and the extent to which his historicizing foray into preliterate ancient Greece was necessarily limited in scope

2006 - International Communication Association Pages: 21 pages || Words: 9216 words || 
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5. Krijnen, Tonny. "Enlarging the Imaginative Diet: Using Television as a Resource to Develop Moral Imagination" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Dresden International Congress Centre, Dresden, Germany, Jun 16, 2006 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-08-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p92045_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: The central question of this study is how people use moral insights offered by television narratives to develop their moral imagination. A framework derived from the literary tradition is employed to research how viewers reflect upon insights into moral issues, moral deliberation and the Other offered by TV narratives. Forty-one in-depth interviews with people from different gender, age, ethnicity and class were analysed, using a grounded theory approach. Three modes of moral reflection emerged during the analysis (interpretative, additional and associated reflection). Results indicate that people do not only use television narratives to reflect on moral insights, they also seem to enjoy reflecting tremendously and while doing so transcending manifest insights offered by TV narratives. Differences between different groups of people and limitations for moral reflections are discussed. I will argue that television is a broad and interesting resource for the development of moral imagination.

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