Guest  

 
Search: 
Search By: SubjectAbstractAuthorTitleFull-Text

 

Showing 1 through 5 of 516 records.
Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 104 - Next  Jump:
2016 - ASEEES Convention Words: 118 words || 
Info
1. Simonyi, Sonja. "'A Little Too Much Goose Liver:' Imaginary Hungarians and Hungarian Imaginaries in Classical Hollywood Cinema" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASEEES Convention, Washington Marriott Wardman Park, Washington, DC, <Not Available>. 2019-05-26 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1138877_index.html>
Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: This paper explores the fictional image of Hungary and Hungarians in Hollywood cinema from the 1930s and early 1940s. Focusing on films directed by emigres from Germany and Austria, the paper argues that the interest of these filmmakers in constructing imaginary Hungarian worlds within Hollywood speaks to structures of enchanting otherness that already defined images of the country within a (Western) European cultural framework long before it appeared in the popular American cinema of the interwar era. The paper will draw on films by directors such as William Wyler and Ernst Lubitsch to describe how this image features in the narratives and how it was informed by broader conceptualizations that pervaded the popular culture these directors came from.

2006 - American Sociological Association Pages: 23 pages || Words: 7075 words || 
Info
2. Widick, Richard. "Violence, Archive, and Memory in the Making of the Redwood Imaginary" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Montreal Convention Center, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, Aug 11, 2006 Online <PDF>. 2019-05-26 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p105514_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Violence, Archive, and Memory draws conclusions and directions for cultural sociology from an extensive ethnographic, historical, and cultural analysis of the redwood timber wars in Humboldt county, California. Taking off from field research conducted on the eve of the preservation deal that established the Headwaters Forest Reserve, I trace the social and environmental conditions of the conflict back through the region’s labor trouble and Indian wars to the performative utterances of the nation’s constitutional framers, whose state-building and people-making texts drove the American market revolution and institutionalized private property in the new world. In participant observation, interviews, and archival study, I found that the Indian wars, the labor wars, and the timber wars each produced a particular moment of extra-ordinary violence around which social memory has crystallized over time. These are events whose representations now inhabit the living, symbolic, and built social world of Humboldt—the Redwood Imaginary. They constitute a landscape of social memory and a media archive that together shape the region's cultures of timber production and environmental resistance, and they map out social history in Humboldt, illuminating the cultural constitution of power and place on this capitalist frontier. They are the material—the cultural material; a meaning-making structure—upon which and within which the future politics and identities that animate the timber war field of cultural production will necessarily be built. In this essay I present the case study and suggest a future for cultural sociology in the study of similar place-based and place-making social imaginaries.

2007 - American Sociological Association Pages: 17 pages || Words: 7523 words || 
Info
3. Riley, Alexander. "Notes on Images and the Social Imaginary in the Construction of Narratives about Flight 93" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, TBA, New York, New York City, Aug 11, 2007 Online <PDF>. 2019-05-26 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p174614_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: The site in Shanksville, PA of the crash of United Flight 93 has received considerably less scholarly and mainstream attention than Ground Zero in New York, but the cultural symbolism and narrative-making being generated there is no less fascinating. From the war on terror catch phrase “Let’s Roll!” to the conflict over the initial design of the permanent memorial, the site has been and is the focus of much construction and contestation of symbolic meaning.
In this essay, I examine some of the visual evidence of this cultural work and suggest some ways we might attempt to understand how those images are mobilized culturally and how they are made elements in particular narratives about the flight and its ultimate meaning/s. The several images to be looked at here include some from the aftermath of the crash, some from the temporary memorial erected afterward and other commemorative sites in the area (e.g., the Flight 93 Chapel located about three miles from the crash site), and some from the design for the permanent memorial. This is a first and relatively brief sketch of a larger and more systematic study, hence the term “notes” in the title of this article.

2004 - International Communication Association Pages: 23 pages || Words: 7359 words || 
Info
4. Petersen, Jennifer. "Speech, Freedom, and the Political Imaginary in 'The People vs. Larry Flynt'" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, New Orleans Sheraton, New Orleans, LA, May 27, 2004 Online <.PDF>. 2019-05-26 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p113217_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The paper analyzes the reception of the movie The People vs. Larry Flynt by reviewers in 13 major US papers, as a beginning point for inquiry about how the popular culture discourse concerning free speech works to construct ideas of freedom and political agency. The author argues that reviewers? reception of and discourse on The People vs. Larry Flynt used representations of freedom of speech to outline an ideological field of freedom in general that defined the reviewers? senses of political and social agency. The reviewers? use of speech to describe freedom, further, worked to elide material conditions that limit freedom. The author suggests that, for the reviewers?, the filmic depiction of freedom of speech (as unlimited, equitably available to all, and belonging to the individual) worked as symbolic proof that freedom in the abstract is unlimited, equitable, and the property of the individual.

2005 - International Communication Association Pages: 24 pages || Words: 8975 words || 
Info
5. Amaya, Hector. "Cultural Freedoms, Cuba, and the Liberal Imaginary" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Sheraton New York, New York City, NY, Online <PDF>. 2019-05-26 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p14675_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This study deals with the construction of cultural freedom in post-revolutionary Cuba as it relates to cultural policy, in particular media and arts policies. I see Cuba’s example as one that forces us to look at cultural freedom as a contingent set of practices and discourses. This approach challenges liberal ideas to freedom by forcing us to explore freedom’s relation to cultural policy and state power. Using Foucault’s ideas on power, I perform a brief genealogy of cultural freedom where I examine freedom’s discursive constitution and its relationship to cultural policy and institutional practices in Cuba from 1959 to 1975. During this period the Cuban leadership instituted policy for film, literature, news, and the general production of culture within the Revolution. Also during this period, Cuba experienced the conflicting forces of censorship, cultural repression, and a cultural renewal that open the field of culture to greater production. This dialectic of power’s productivity puts into question essentialist ideas of freedom and suggest the existence of an ongoing link between freedom, discourse, and practice.

Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 104 - Next  Jump:

©2019 All Academic, Inc.   |   All Academic Privacy Policy