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2010 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 7597 words || 
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1. Buntin, Jennifer. "Beyond the Immigrant Church: Conceptualizing Connections Between Immigrants and Non-Immigrant Churches" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton Atlanta and Atlanta Marriott Marquis, Atlanta, GA, Aug 13, 2010 Online <PDF>. 2019-10-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p410320_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Current approaches to migration generally limit their analyses to the migrants and the migrant community, in isolation from the broader receiving community. With regard to religion, this limitation translates into a focus on the immigrant or ethnic church as the primary unit of analysis for the study of immigrant religious participation. In this article, I challenge this assumption by asking the following question: In new US immigrant destinations, do non-immigrant churches interact with and incorporate the immigrants? If so, in what ways? To answer this question, I utilize data from a case study of non-immigrant churches in Aurora, Illinois, a community on the western edge of the Chicago metropolitan area that has experienced a dramatic influx of Mexican immigrants since the 1990s. My findings suggest three models for understanding these interactions: the mission model, the sister church model, and the multi-ethnic congregation model. In sum, these models depict varying degrees of immigrant/ethnic incorporation, as well as a diverse set of social relations between immigrants and non-immigrants that are obscured by current approaches to studying immigrant religious activity.

2007 - American Political Science Association Pages: 30 pages || Words: 7035 words || 
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2. Cho, Grace. "Representing Immigrants? The Influence of Public Opinion on Immigration and Legislators' Votes on Immigration Policy in the 109th Congress" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Hyatt Regency Chicago and the Sheraton Chicago Hotel and Towers, Chicago, IL, Aug 30, 2007 <Not Available>. 2019-10-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p211242_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This paper take a preliminary look at the influence of public opinion on immigration on how members of the 109th Congress voted on the 2005 Border Protection, Antiterrorism, and Illegal Immigration Control Act (HR 4437) and the 2006 Secure Fence Act (HR 6061). Using district-level public opinion data from the 2004 National Annenberg Election Study (NAES) and district-level demographic data from the 2005 American Community Survey, I find that while public opinion on immigration aligned closely with how members of Congress voted on these bills, the noncitizen immigrant population in a district had no significant effect on legislators' votes.

2017 - Comparative and International Education Society CIES Annual Meeting Words: 463 words || 
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3. Kim, Hyungryeol. and Byun, Soo-Yong. "Immigration Policy and Immigrant Adolescents’ Attitudes towards Immigrant Rights and the Host Country: Evidence from 17 Countries" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Comparative and International Education Society CIES Annual Meeting, Sheraton Atlanta Downtown, Atlanta, Georgia, Mar 05, 2017 <Not Available>. 2019-10-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1216464_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Facing the phenomenal surge of international migration during the past two decades, most countries are hosting a large and growing population of immigrants, a substantial number of whom are school-age children. While much prior research has investigated immigrant adolescents’ socioeconomic integration in the host country (e.g., their labor market assimilation or educational achievement and attainment), relatively less attention has been given to how immigrant children and children of immigrants understand their rights in the host country, and how they evaluate their newly found home. Further, less is known to how such immigrant adolescents’ attitudes toward immigrant rights and attitudes toward their host country differ across countries, particularly depending on a country’s immigration policy. To address these gaps in our knowledge, this study investigates cross-national differences in immigrant adolescents’ attitudes toward immigrant rights and attitudes toward their host country and how country-level immigration policy may explain, if any, such cross-national differences over and above individual-level characteristics.

Toward this end, using data from 2009 International Civic and Citizenship Education Study (ICCS), combined with immigration policy indices from 2007 Migrant Integration Policy Index (MIPEX), this study first examines the magnitude of differences in (1) attitudes toward immigrant rights and (2) attitudes toward their country between immigrant and nonimmigrant adolescents for 17 countries, controlling for other individual variables (e.g., socioeconomic status, age, gender, etc.). Second, we investigate whether the degree to which the host country’s policies for immigrant integration are exclusionary/inclusionary is related to cross-national variation in immigrant/nonimmigrant differences in these two outcome variables. Among others, we focus on four domains of immigration policies: Political participation, education, citizenship acquisition, and anti-discrimination.

Our preliminary results from the two-level hierarchical linear modeling (HLM) analyses suggest that in general immigrant adolescents are more supportive to equal rights for immigrants but less positive towards the host country compared to nonimmigrant adolescents in many countries, even after controlling for other individual-level characteristics, and that such the degree of immigrant/nonimmigrant differences in attitudes towards immigrant rights and the host country differs across countries. Further, results reveal that country-level immigration policy contexts contribute to explaining cross-national differences in attitudes toward immigrant rights and attitudes toward the host country between immigrant and nonimmigrant adolescents, even after controlling for individual-level characteristics. Specifically, we find that immigrant adolescents in countries with inclusionary immigration policies are more supportive to equal rights for immigrants and more positive towards the host country than their counterpart immigrants in countries with exclusionary immigration policies. In the full paper, we will include more sophisticate analyses, including but not limited to testing interactions between socioeconomic background and immigration status, and more fully discuss theoretical and policy implications of our findings.

2013 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 8278 words || 
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4. Kibria, Nazli., O'Leary, Megan. and Bowman, Cara. "Good Immigrant-Bad Immigrant: The Racialization of Immigrant Families" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton New York and Sheraton New York, New York, NY, Aug 10, 2013 Online <PDF>. 2019-10-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p648942_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Our paper explores the political discourse of immigration in the US today. Analysts have long noted the presence of a good-bad immigrant rhetoric. We explore how these images mark three political camps: immigration restrictionists, advocates and pragmatists. An exploration of the discourse on birthright citizenship, E-verify, the DREAM Act and H1-B visa renewal shows the significance of racialized notions of family in the construction of "good" and "bad" immigrants. We argue that the racialization of immigrant families is a central feature of these debates.

2018 - MPSA Annual Conference Words: 41 words || 
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5. Casimiro Vieyra, Esaú. "Let’s Talk Immigration: The Misconceptions of Immigration as an Economic Threat and Women’s Perspectives on Immigration" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the MPSA Annual Conference, Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, IL, Apr 05, 2018 <Not Available>. 2019-10-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1372395_index.html>
Publication Type: Undergraduate Poster
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This project aims to understand the opinions of immigration through the lens of gender given the economic anxiety that has impacted the opinions on immigration. Moreover, I explain why immigration is needed as a major force that drives the economy.

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