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2016 - American Society of Criminology – 72nd Annual Meeting Words: 177 words || 
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1. Osborne, Jeffery. and Salfati, C.. "Connecting Active Shooter Offender & Incident Characteristics: Do Different Types of Offenders Commit Different Types of Incidents?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Criminology – 72nd Annual Meeting, Hilton New Orleans Riverside, New Orleans, LA, <Not Available>. 2019-12-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1149611_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Abstract: Active shooter incidents have been described as situations wherein individuals enter a public setting and with a firearm kill or injure multiple people. Previous literature on this topic tends to employ case-study methodologies and uses descriptive statistics to identify frequent characteristics of these offenders and incidents. Recently, however, research has placed a greater emphasis on empirical testing to better examine the connection between active shooter offenders and their incidents. Currently, the extent to which offender-level characteristics influence incident-level characteristics remains unknown. Importantly, an empirical assessment of whether different types of active shooters commit different types of incidents can help practitioners be better prepared for different types of situations, as well as more informed when designing risk assessment models for a variety of individuals. The present study examined information pertaining to both offender-level and incident-level characteristics of active shooter incidents that were carried out between 2000 and 2013. Using Multidimensional Scaling techniques, distinct subtypes of incidents were identified. Results will be discussed in the context of practical implications for law enforcement involved in an active shooter incident.

2016 - American Society of Criminology – 72nd Annual Meeting Words: 106 words || 
Info
2. Lee, Sung., Circo, Giovanni. and McGarrell, Edmund. "Comparing the Geospatial Patterns of Crime Incidents Using Police Incident Reports and Victimization Survey Reports" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Criminology – 72nd Annual Meeting, Hilton New Orleans Riverside, New Orleans, LA, <Not Available>. 2019-12-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1148577_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Abstract: Since at least the days of the Chicago School of Criminology, research has demonstrated strong geographical patterns of crime. More contemporary research reinforces the strong connection between crime and place. Most of this research is based on official police crime data. The current study adds to this tradition by comparing geospatial patterns of crime in one city in Michigan through the use of both police crime incident data and the results of a local level victimization survey. The analyses examine the consistency between these crime measurement systems and begins to tease out factors that might generate inconsistencies between police and victimization data.

2004 - International Communication Association Pages: 19 pages || Words: 5914 words || 
Info
3. Koning, Karen. and De Jong, Menno. "The Critical Incident Technique as a Communication Audit Tool. A study into the Quality of Organizational Communication" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, New Orleans Sheraton, New Orleans, LA, May 27, 2004 Online <.PDF>. 2019-12-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p112904_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The critical incident technique is one of the current methods used in commu-ni-cation audits. There is an abundance of ‘how to’ information available about the method, and various case studies underline the method’s usefulness to investigate the quality of organizational communication. However, little is known about the way the method works: what kinds of incidents do employees report, and how can these incidents best be used to diagnose communication problems in an organi-za-tion. These questions are addressed in this paper, based on data that were collected among teachers, management and staff of a high school in the Netherlands.

2006 - American Society of Criminology (ASC) Words: 175 words || 
Info
4. Regoeczi, Wendy. and Chilton, Roland. "Understanding Variations in Police Approaches to Non-Predatory Crimes: Clues from the National Incident-Based Reporting Program" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Criminology (ASC), Los Angeles Convention Center, Los Angeles, CA, Nov 01, 2006 <Not Available>. 2019-12-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p126047_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: The FBI’s National Incident-Based Reporting System (NIBRS) has created an unprecedented opportunity to study police policies and practices in the enforcement of laws prohibiting non-predatory activity. In NIBRS, there are five non-predatory offenses. These “crimes against society.” are drug, gambling, weapon, prostitution, and pornography offenses. Tabulations of these counts indicate wide variation in the reporting of such offenses. For example, in 2002, 90 percent of the agencies submitting NIBRS data reported no prostitution offenses. Of the 3,803 NIBRS agencies that reported 3.8 million offenses in 46 crime categories in 2002 only 137 reported pornography offenses. Some agencies report no drug offenses. The goal of our study was to evaluate these variations, beginning with an examination of the census characteristics of cities with the highest rates of involvement for specific offenses and the characteristics of cities with no involvement for the same offenses. Although better answers will come when we combine the statistical analysis with interviews with police personnel, this study provides clues to the reasons for aggressive and non-aggressive police approaches to non-predatory crime.

2007 - NCA 93rd Annual Convention Pages: 23 pages || Words: 6024 words || 
Info
5. Eaves, Katherine. "How Could This Have Happened? A Rhetorical Criticism of the Apologia Employed by Newspapers After an Incident of Journalistic Fraud." Paper presented at the annual meeting of the NCA 93rd Annual Convention, TBA, Chicago, IL, Nov 15, 2007 Online <PDF>. 2019-12-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p195507_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This study examines the rhetorical genre of apologia in the context of journalism. More specifically, it focuses on the apologia employed by the New York Times after the 2003 Jayson Blair scandal, and Washington Post after the revocation of Janet Cooke’s Pulitzer Prize in 1981.

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