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2005 - American Sociological Association Pages: 32 pages || Words: 8911 words || 
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1. Gangl, Markus. "Income inequality, permanent incomes and income dynamics: comparing Europe to the United States" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Marriott Hotel, Loews Philadelphia Hotel, Philadelphia, PA, Aug 12, 2005 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-06-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p19603_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: As income mobility over time serves to offset income inequality existing at any point in time, cross-national differences in social stratification are preferably assessed from data on average incomes over an extended period of time. Hence, this paper uses longitudinal income data from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics and the European Community Household Panel to reassess the received empirical evidence. Even discounting the impact of income mobility, however, the U.S. continues to exhibit the highest level of permanent income inequality in this particular sample of industrial countries. In addition, older workers and individuals at the bottom of the income distribution have faced significantly worse income prospects than common in many European countries.

2005 - American Sociological Association Pages: 25 pages || Words: 6329 words || 
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2. Gupta, Sanjiv., Evertsson, Marie., Merz, Sabine., Sayer, Liana. and Nermo, Magnus. "Housework, Income, and Nation: A Comparative Investigation of the Effects of Women's and Men's Incomes on Housework Hours" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Marriott Hotel, Loews Philadelphia Hotel, Philadelphia, PA, Aug 12, 2005 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-06-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p21407_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Using nationally representative individual-level data from four countries—Australia, Germany, Sweden, and the U.S.—we assess the independent effects of men’s and women’s absolute earnings on their housework hours. The effect of women’s earnings on the housework hours of both women and men is substantially greater than the effect of men’s incomes. This finding is consistent across all four nations, despite the differences in their aggregate levels of gender egalitarianism, and in their gender and family policies. Regardless of the macro-level gender arrangements prevailing in a given nation, women’s earnings have a larger impact on the division of domestic labor than do men’s. In particular, they matter much more to women’s own housework time. The finding emphasizes the gender segregation of domestic labor, not only in terms of time, but also in the intrahousehold allocation of economic resources devoted to its performance. The consistency of the finding across datasets and countries resolves certain discrepancies in earlier research regarding the effects of men’s and women’s relative earnings on housework time.

2016 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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3. Edmunds, Christina. and Rowley, Kristie. "Who Benefits from Income Inequality? An International Examination of Income Inequality and Student Achievement" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Washington State Convention Center, Seattle, WA, Aug 17, 2016 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-06-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1115086_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This study directly tests the relationship between income inequality and student mathematics achievement. Furthermore, we examine the degree to which the relationship between income inequality and student achievement is moderated by student SES. To test these relationships, we created a database of national wealth measures and linked it with student achievement data from the 2009 Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA). The results of multilevel models indicated that income inequality is negatively related to student achievement scores. Additionally, this relationship is not moderated by student SES, indicating that the relationship between income inequality and student achievement is the same for both low- and high-SES students. The results of this study suggest that nations seeking to improve student achievement can do so by decreasing income inequality.

2011 - Eighteenth International Conference of the Council for European Studies Words: 1 words || 
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4. de Beer, Paul. "The impact of the crisis on income levels and income distribution" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Eighteenth International Conference of the Council for European Studies, Various University Venues, Barcelona, Spain, <Not Available>. 2019-06-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p515881_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: (abstract)

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