Guest  

 
Search: 
Search By: SubjectAbstractAuthorTitleFull-Text

 

Showing 1 through 5 of 1,939 records.
Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 388 - Next  Jump:
2005 - American Sociological Association Pages: 32 pages || Words: 8911 words || 
Info
1. Gangl, Markus. "Income inequality, permanent incomes and income dynamics: comparing Europe to the United States" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Marriott Hotel, Loews Philadelphia Hotel, Philadelphia, PA, Aug 12, 2005 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2020-02-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p19603_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: As income mobility over time serves to offset income inequality existing at any point in time, cross-national differences in social stratification are preferably assessed from data on average incomes over an extended period of time. Hence, this paper uses longitudinal income data from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics and the European Community Household Panel to reassess the received empirical evidence. Even discounting the impact of income mobility, however, the U.S. continues to exhibit the highest level of permanent income inequality in this particular sample of industrial countries. In addition, older workers and individuals at the bottom of the income distribution have faced significantly worse income prospects than common in many European countries.

2007 - American Political Science Association Words: 247 words || 
Info
2. Fairfield, Tasha. "The Politics of Taxing Latin American Elites: The Corporate Income Tax in Chile and Interest Income in Argentina" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Hyatt Regency Chicago and the Sheraton Chicago Hotel and Towers, Chicago, IL, Aug 30, 2007 <Not Available>. 2020-02-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p209725_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This paper examines constraints that limit possibilities for raising revenue from Latin America's under-taxed elites, which is critical for redistribution and for strengthening tax systems. Constraints can be either political or structural, and they very both across countries and across tax policy areas. I emphasize constraints that restrict the agenda space—that is, the set of reforms that policymakers consider as feasible options.

I examine three politically salient areas of reform that are critical for improving tax equity in Chile and Argentina: increasing the corporate tax, taxing interest earned on financial assets (which is exempt in Argentina) and expanding tax agency access to bank information. In Chile, constraints are political rather than structural. Organizational and institutional factors enhance the influence of the right and business over the Concertación’s corporate tax agenda beyond what would be expected from a simple reading of the configuration of powers in Congress and the structural power of capital. The same factors blocked access to information on checking accounts. In contrast, in the absence of such political constraints, the Argentine business sector achieved little influence over cross-sectoral corporate taxes from 1993 to 2005. However, both structural and political constraints hindered taxation of interest earnings and access to information on time deposits in Argentina. The powerful financial sector lobby, in combination with a widespread perception that taxing interest would cause depositors to withdraw their funds from the banks, kept these issues off of the reform agenda.

2007 - American Sociological Association Pages: 18 pages || Words: 3643 words || 
Info
3. Raffalovich, Lawrence., Monnat, Shannon. and Tsao, Hui-Shien. "The Family Income Distribution: Income Components and Demographic Characteristics" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, TBA, New York, New York City, Aug 11, 2007 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2020-02-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p183684_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: The Family Income Distribution: Income Components and Demographic Characteristics

ABSTRACT
Attention has recently been focused on wealth as a source of long-term economic security and on wealth ownership as a crucial aspect of the racial economic divisions in the United States. This literature, however has been concerned primarily with the wealth gap between poor and middle-class families, and between the white and black middle class. In this paper, we investigate the incomes of families at the top and bottom of the family income distribution. We examine the sources of income and the demographic characteristics of these
high-income and low-income families.
Using family level data from the 1988-2003 Current Population Surveys, we find that employment income is the largest component of family income at the top of the income distribution. At the bottom of the distribution, transfer income is the major income source; in particular, income from social security, supplemental security, and public assistance.
Our findings regarding the demographic characteristics of families support the argument that the family income distribution is strongly affected by race, gender, age, and marital status. Non-white, female, and non-married householders are disproportionately located at the bottom of the family income distribution; white, male, and married householders are located at the top. Our findings do not support the argument that wealth is an important source of income for families at the highest percentiles of family income. The highest income families during this period in the U.S. were not a “property elite”. We do not find the large income advantages to wealth ownership that are the focus of the recent research on the economic divide, but that research places particular emphasis on home ownership, a form of wealth of widely distributed among middle class families, but that does not contribute to a family’s income stream.

2006 - The Midwest Political Science Association Pages: 60 pages || Words: 18537 words || 
Info
4. Kimball, Mark. "A Shift in Taxation of Income From Capital to Income From Labor: The Need for a More Comprehensive Paradigm; The Need for a More Integrated Analysis" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Midwest Political Science Association, Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, Illinois, Apr 20, 2006 <Not Available>. 2020-02-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p140259_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: The federal income tax burden has shifted from those who hold capital for the production of income to those who provide labor for income as legal, political and economic paradigms and theories compete. Many tax code revisions are enacted without full disclosure of cost, and proposed revisions have been enacted in a political context in which benefit and cost are bifurcated and perceived disparately by voters. A comparative shift of the tax burden to those who work has resulted in both real and comparative economic decline. A need exists for multidisciplinary, multi-method study and analysis of competing interests which can include and weight varying objectives and legal, political and economic policy-making paradigms and theories. Equitable revisions in the U.S. tax code cannot occur in the absence of a matrix or matrixes which reconcile, or at least which attempt to reconcile, competing interests, agendas and neo-ontologies.

Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 388 - Next  Jump:

©2020 All Academic, Inc.   |   All Academic Privacy Policy