Guest  

 
Search: 
Search By: SubjectAbstractAuthorTitleFull-Text

 

Showing 1 through 5 of 823 records.
Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 165 - Next  Jump:
2019 - American Sociological Association Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
Info
1. Bueker, Catherine. "Political Incorporation, Dis-Incorporation, or Something in Between: Political Confidence among 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Generation Americans" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Hilton New York Midtown & Sheraton New York Times Square Hotel, New York City, Aug 09, 2019 Online <PDF>. 2019-12-13 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1514195_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Using five years of the General Social Survey (2008, 2010, 2012, 2014, 2016), this study seeks to improve our understanding of the levels of political confidence held by immigrant, second, and third generation Americans racialized as white, black, Latino, and Asian. Findings illustrate that immigrants, overall, possess higher levels of trust in all three branches of government than do third+ generation Americans. The second generation continues to maintain higher levels of trust, albeit smaller, in both Congress and the Executive branch, but there is no statistically significant difference in attitudes towards the Supreme Court, suggesting a trend towards civic assimilation. When the data are disaggregated by ethno-racial group and generation, variations appear. Groups generally report internally higher levels of confidence in the first generation, with generations two and three looking similar to one another. Analyzing within generation, but across groups, the data illustrate a pattern of Asian and Latino Americans reporting greater levels of confidence towards certain branches of government than do white Americans in the first and second generations, while black and white Americans look quite similar in generations one and two. By the third generation, black Americans show statistically significantly lower levels of confidence in the judiciary, vis-à-vis their white counterparts, suggesting a process of disincorporation.

2018 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 4238 words || 
Info
2. Munasinghe, Hansini. and Bruch, Sarah. "Incorporating and Marginalizing Experiences in School and their Impact on the Civic Incorporation of Immigrant Children" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Pennsylvania Convention Center & Philadelphia Marriott, Philadelphia, PA, Aug 09, 2018 Online <PDF>. 2019-12-13 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1380543_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper seeks to further our understanding of schools as a key institution of immigrant children’s political and civic incorporation, not only as settings where politically- and civically-relevant knowledge and skills are acquired, but also contexts wherein children face both incorporating and marginalizing experiences in interactions with teachers and peers. We hypothesize that these first and formative experiences can shape immigrant children’s civic engagement in adolescence and in young adulthood. Using data from the Educational Longitudinal Study of 2002, this study explores differences in how children experience school by focusing on incorporating experiences – positive relationship with teachers, participation in school activities, and perceiving school rules as fair –, and marginalizing experiences – punitive sanctions, and not feeling safe at school. Comparing 1.5- and second-generation Asian and Latino children to their third+ generation white and Black peers, the results find important differences in these incorporating and marginalizing experiences by race/ethnicity and immigrant generation. The effects of these incorporating or marginalizing experiences on civic participation in adolescence and in young adulthood are explored. These preliminary findings indicate the importance of understanding the role of schools in immigrant children’s incorporation, not only as a medium of civic knowledge and skills, but also as a context wherein formative incorporating or marginalizing experiences shape their future civic and political incorporation. More broadly, this paper contributes to a relational approach to understanding immigrant incorporation.

2005 - American Political Science Association Pages: 27 pages || Words: 9129 words || 
Info
3. Brady, John. "From Allegiance to Automatic Incorporation: Constitutional Patriotism as a Standard of Political Incorporation" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Marriott Wardman Park, Omni Shoreham, Washington Hilton, Washington, DC, Sep 01, 2005 <Not Available>. 2019-12-13 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p39851_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In this paper, I explore the extent to which the ideal of constitutional patriotism can serve as a standard of incorporation and, hence, as a source of guidance for judging how best to address the conflicting imperatives and tensions of multicultural politics in liberal societies. Up until now, the theoretical discussion of constitutional patriotism has focused almost solely on the topics of political identity and motivation and specifically whether constitutional patriotism as the affective component of a post-national political identity is robust enough to motivate citizens to consider one another as co-participants in a common project of democratic decision making. (Bernstein 2001; Calhoun 2002; Honohan 2001; Ingram 1996; Laborde 2002; Lacroix 2002; McCarthy 1999; Pensky 2001; Yack 1996; but also see Bartholomew 2001 and Benhabib 2002) These issues are centrally important to contemporary democratic theory, of course, but in framing them in this way participants have tacitly assumed that the question of incorporation has been answered and the borders defining the set of legitimate participants have been set. In a world characterized by mass immigration in which the question ‘Who belongs?’ has become a central issue of contemporary politics, this seems a very large question to beg.

2014 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 10980 words || 
Info
4. Bohrt, Marcelo. and Itzigsohn, Jose. "Class, Race and the Incorporation of Latinos/as: Testing the Stratified Ethnoracial Incorporation Approach" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton San Francisco Union Square and Parc 55 Wyndham San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, Aug 15, 2014 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-12-13 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p722876_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Since 1965, the United States has experienced its second large wave of immigration, re-igniting a concern with the future prospects of immigrants and their children. The question that concerns social scientists and policy makers alike is, what is the pattern of incorporation of contemporary immigrants? The debate has ranged between those who argue that the trajectory of incorporation of contemporary immigrants follows the path of earlier European immigrants and those who argue that contemporary immigrants experience downward assimilation. We examine a novel approach to this question, analyzing the intergenerational patterns of class stratification of Latino/a immigrants compared to non-Hispanic Whites. Using individual-level data from the CPS ASEC, we find that while the children of immigrants experience upward mobility vis-à-vis the first generation, they enter a stable racialized class system that differentially constrains the mobility prospects of native and immigrant groups. Our findings point to the need for a new approach to understand the patterns of incorporation of the children of immigrants, one that brings race and class to the center of the analysis.

Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 165 - Next  Jump:

©2019 All Academic, Inc.   |   All Academic Privacy Policy