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2013 - American Studies Association Annual Meeting Words: 292 words || 
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1. Chandra, Shefali. "India, India, India" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Studies Association Annual Meeting, Hilton Washington, Washington, DC, <Not Available>. 2019-05-27 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p656143_index.html>
Publication Type: Internal Paper
Abstract: When women’s studies units took the “transnational” turn about two decades ago, they invariably looked to India. Those India scholars conversant in postcolonial studies and development studies increasingly found (joint) homes in women’s studies units, and these in turn saw the rise of new courses on global feminism and transnationality. Rarely acknowledged as specialists of “India” or “South Asia”, transnational scholars in women’s studies were instead charged with the task of globalizing the gender studies curriculum. While this left much of the insularity of women’s studies intact, it also served to occlude questions on race (for the United States) and caste (for India). Simultaneously, universities institutionalized study abroad programs, here too India occupied a privileged role.

My interest in this paper is to situate the politics of knowledge formation on India in a much broader context: the United States’ geopolitical relationship with postcolonial India. Connecting the knowledge produced on India through two sites vital both to the neoliberal university as well as the production of diversity narratives - gender studies and undergraduate study abroad - this paper will examine the circuit of exceptionalism, gender, and neo-orientalism put in place through the Indo-US relationship. From the Cold War, the years of the professional “brain drain,” through the years of structural adjustment and the 9/11 partnership of “democracies against terror” India has occupied a particular place of privileged alterity that sanctions and materializes U.S. imperializing desires. I seek to historicize the Indo-US relationship through the production of knowledge on India. My purpose is to work with the information gathered in our roundtable and with the audience to build a conversation on the politics of the transnational turn in women’s studies departments, and the commitment to global competency as lauded by universities since the 1990s.

2008 - ASC Annual Meeting Words: 188 words || 
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2. Hakeem, Farrukh. "Police Administration and Justice in Medieval India: An Examination of Policy in Mughal India" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASC Annual Meeting, St. Louis Adam's Mark, St. Louis, Missouri, <Not Available>. 2019-05-27 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p269510_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: The policing system of India went through various phases during the process of conquest by foreign rulers. The Aryan system yielded to the Islamicate system (Arab-Persian-Turkic) after the Muslim rulers embarked on a more permanent stay in India. Though the Islamicate system was incorporated into the Indian context it could not survive in its original form and had to be adapted to the Indian environment. The Panchayati system of India in combination with the Islamicate systems of the Delhi Sultanates and the Mughal Emperors respectively created a very unique administrative blend. This article examines the functioning of the police during the Mughal period (1526-1707). This paper postulates that the Islamicate system that the Mughals inherited through the Delhi Sultanates was in turn transformed when this system came into contact with the Indian environment. These new systems went through a profound change when coming into contact with Indian society, institutions and culture. The legal system and the policing system employed by the Mughals incorporated elements of Indian law and administration. The resulting system ended up as one that can be more accurately characterized as an Islamicate-Indian one.

2015 - Association for Asian Studies - Annual Conference Words: 260 words || 
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3. Sramek, Joe. "Experiencing Britishness in Company India? Scottish Officers and Soldiers in the East India Company’s Armies, 1765-1858" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Asian Studies - Annual Conference, Sheraton Hotel & Towers, Chicago, Illinois, <Not Available>. 2019-05-27 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p950883_index.html>
Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: This paper explores how various Scottish military personnel serving in the East India Company’s armies experienced being “British” during the Company period of colonial rule in India. For a quarter-century at least, scholars have vigorously debated how English, Scottish, Welsh, and Irish became integrated (or not) into the composite identity of “Britishness” over the course of the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. Much of this discussion has centered on Europe; despite the fact that both the British state and the British Empire were mutually constitutive of each other during this period, the empire has largely been ignored in this scholarly debate. Yet, as this paper argues, it is in colonial “contact zones” (Mary Louise Pratt) such as Company India that the tensions of the British national/imperial-building projects can be most fruitfully analyzed. The Company was one of the few truly pan-British institutions during this period, employing personnel from all four nations but disproportionately from Scotland (and Ireland). Moreover, it is through analyzing personal experience – through closely reading diaries, letters, and other personal papers – rather than discourse, that the personal dilemmas of identity-formation during this period can be most successfully explored. Drawing upon the rich collections of personal papers held at the British Library and the National Library of Scotland, this paper contends that Scottish military officers and soldiers, rather than automatically embracing an “imperial British” identity in the empire, experienced and embraced multiple overlapping identities (imperial Britishness but also Scottishness, Highlander, Lowlander, Glaswegian, etc.) during the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries.

2016 - National Women's Studies Association Words: 99 words || 
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4. Gupta, Soumitree. "“This is My Story:” Bearing Witness and Queering Mother India in Safina Uberoi’s My Mother India" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the National Women's Studies Association, Palais des congrès de Montréal, Montreal, Quebec, Nov 10, 2016 <Not Available>. 2019-05-27 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1142665_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper examines the aesthetics and politics of decolonial feminist critique within an emergent genre of first-person “accented daughter-films” (Naficy) in the Indian diaspora. Specifically, it focuses on MY MOTHER INDIA (2001) by Australian-Sikh filmmaker, Safina Uberoi, to examine how the aesthetics of accented first-person cinema are deployed to bear witness to the lived memories of the racial/ethnic/religious/queered Other within the postcolonial Hindu nation. This essay examines the urgent relevance of the film’s decolonial feminist interrogation of xenophobic/queerphobic Hindu nationalist discourses of the home-nation in relation to the resurgence of Hindu right discourses in mainstream Indian politics and media.

2013 - Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication Pages: unavailable || Words: 7373 words || 
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5. Paul, Newly. "Foreign Correspondence in the Digital Age: An analysis of India Ink—the New York Times’ India-specific blog" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication, Renaissance Hotel, Washington DC, Aug 08, 2013 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-05-27 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p670473_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper is a case study of India Ink, the New York Times’ first country-specific blog, launched in September 2011. This paper examines the blog’s content in order to analyze the ways in which participatory Web 2.0 tools have changed foreign coverage. Findings indicate that through interactive multimedia, crowd-sourced content, and collaboration between Indian and American reporters, India Ink is helping foreign correspondence thrive amidst drastic newsroom budget cuts.

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