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2013 - American Studies Association Annual Meeting Words: 292 words || 
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1. Chandra, Shefali. "India, India, India" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Studies Association Annual Meeting, Hilton Washington, Washington, DC, <Not Available>. 2019-08-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p656143_index.html>
Publication Type: Internal Paper
Abstract: When women’s studies units took the “transnational” turn about two decades ago, they invariably looked to India. Those India scholars conversant in postcolonial studies and development studies increasingly found (joint) homes in women’s studies units, and these in turn saw the rise of new courses on global feminism and transnationality. Rarely acknowledged as specialists of “India” or “South Asia”, transnational scholars in women’s studies were instead charged with the task of globalizing the gender studies curriculum. While this left much of the insularity of women’s studies intact, it also served to occlude questions on race (for the United States) and caste (for India). Simultaneously, universities institutionalized study abroad programs, here too India occupied a privileged role.

My interest in this paper is to situate the politics of knowledge formation on India in a much broader context: the United States’ geopolitical relationship with postcolonial India. Connecting the knowledge produced on India through two sites vital both to the neoliberal university as well as the production of diversity narratives - gender studies and undergraduate study abroad - this paper will examine the circuit of exceptionalism, gender, and neo-orientalism put in place through the Indo-US relationship. From the Cold War, the years of the professional “brain drain,” through the years of structural adjustment and the 9/11 partnership of “democracies against terror” India has occupied a particular place of privileged alterity that sanctions and materializes U.S. imperializing desires. I seek to historicize the Indo-US relationship through the production of knowledge on India. My purpose is to work with the information gathered in our roundtable and with the audience to build a conversation on the politics of the transnational turn in women’s studies departments, and the commitment to global competency as lauded by universities since the 1990s.

2005 - American Political Science Association Pages: 39 pages || Words: 13590 words || 
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2. Mudaliar, Chandra. "India's Gender Representation Policy and Women's Emerging Political Leadership at Grassroots in India" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Marriott Wardman Park, Omni Shoreham, Washington Hilton, Washington, DC, Sep 01, 2005 <Not Available>. 2019-08-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p41264_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In this paper I examine India’s gender reservation policy, women’s emerging political leadership and make anecdotal studies of women representatives as political actors. To those ends I examine, among others, four main issues. The first issue traces the historical background of the gender reservation policy with a view to identify the main objectives of India’s gender policy. The second issue examines the reservation scheme, and explains the mechanism for the reservation of seats for women, and how it (the mechanism) differs from the European and the Latin American reservation schemes for women. In the third issue I study the impact of the panchyat elections of 1992\3 and 1998\99 on the elections of women representative, and whether they gain any political leverage at grassroots in Karnataka. In the study of the fourth issue I examine the nature of women’s emerging political leadership with a view to defining it.

2009 - Southern Political Science Association Pages: 1 pages || Words: 249 words || 
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3. Varma, Tulika. and Biswas, Masudul. "U.S.-India Civilian Nuclear Agreement: A framing analysis of U.S.-India relations" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Southern Political Science Association, Hotel Intercontinental, New Orleans, LA, Jan 07, 2009 Online <PDF>. 2019-08-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p282157_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: For decades, U.S.–India relationship has been mired in the cold-war politics. However, in recent years relations between the two countries have improved significantly, facilitated partly by India’s agreement to work jointly on counter-terrorism operations after 9/11. Building on this, U.S. and India signed a landmark civilian nuclear agreement in July 2005. The civilian nuclear agreement gave India access to U.S. nuclear fuel and technology despite India’s refusal to sign the nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT). This agreement nearly brought down the coalition government in India and evoked strong reactions in some U.S. government officials who believed this agreement undermined the sanctity of the NPT. Most of the literature on relations between domestic policy and International relations suggest they are linked. However, Putnam (1988) argues that it is more important to determine “how” and “when” domestic polices influence international relations. In this context, this study will examine how government policy makers and presidential support for U.S.-India civilian nuclear agreement influence U.S.-India relations through framing analysis. Government officials and other key political actors advance their position on important policy issues through media. Researchers will use textual analysis to examine the frames advanced by Indian and U.S. government officials in two national Indian newspapers, The Times of India and Nava Bharat Times, and two U.S. newspapers, The New York Times and Washington Post from January 2008 - July 2008, when the issue gained momentum in news media. Findings from this study will advance our understanding on how domestic policies influence international relations.

2010 - Theory vs. Policy? Connecting Scholars and Practitioners Pages: 28 pages || Words: 11498 words || 
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4. Chaudhuri, Rudra. "Re-assessing India’s emerging foreign policy of strategic engagement: An inside look at India’s response to the Iraq War (2003)" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Theory vs. Policy? Connecting Scholars and Practitioners, New Orleans Hilton Riverside Hotel, The Loews New Orleans Hotel, New Orleans, LA, Feb 17, 2010 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-08-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p414713_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The conventional wisdom regards India’s contemporary approach to foreign policy is underpinned on the central theme of change. Strategic engagement is a mantra that has come to replace the traditional moorings of non-alignment. Scholars and practitioners alike argue that since the Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP)-led Government came to power in 1998, a normative shift took place. ‘Pragmatism’ opposed to ‘age-old ideals’ came to inform policy. Yet, a detailed assessment of India’s response to the US request to contribute troops in 2003, an under-studied case, demonstrates that in fact, the BJP-led leadership were far more restrained in there interactions with US officials than commentators make out.

This paper, based on extensive interviews with key bureaucrats, politicians, and negotiators both in India and the US, attempts to re-assess what now seems to be understood as the conventional wisdom in both countries. It makes the case that rather than change per se; India is undergoing a process of cultural change. This is not a question of newer ideas replacing older ideas regards foreign policy, but rather the meshing of older and newer ideas. Embedded are tensions and knots that both the case study make clear have not yet been unravelled by India’s policy/political elite across party lines.

2013 - Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication Pages: unavailable || Words: 7373 words || 
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5. Paul, Newly. "Foreign Correspondence in the Digital Age: An analysis of India Ink—the New York Times’ India-specific blog" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication, Renaissance Hotel, Washington DC, Aug 08, 2013 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-08-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p670473_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper is a case study of India Ink, the New York Times’ first country-specific blog, launched in September 2011. This paper examines the blog’s content in order to analyze the ways in which participatory Web 2.0 tools have changed foreign coverage. Findings indicate that through interactive multimedia, crowd-sourced content, and collaboration between Indian and American reporters, India Ink is helping foreign correspondence thrive amidst drastic newsroom budget cuts.

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