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2016 - Native American and Indigenous Studies Association Annual Conference Words: 236 words || 
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1. Keeler, Kasey. "Indian Homes and Indian Loans: American Indian Veterans and Inaccessible VA Home Loan Benefits" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Native American and Indigenous Studies Association Annual Conference, Ala Moana Hotel, Honolulu, Hawaii, May 18, 2016 <Not Available>. 2020-01-27 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1102325_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In this paper I interrogate the language, goals, and implementation of VA housing programs from the GI Bill of 1944 to today’s Native American Direct Loan to examine the ways American Indians have been prevented from accessing VA housing benefits. The GI Bill of 1944, also known as the Servicemen’s Readjustment Act, significantly altered and shaped the economic outlook for the entire country setting in motion housing development for the remainder of the century. Since WWII, the GI Bill has been reproduced and redesigned to provide education programs, health care, and temporary financial assistance to veterans. Yet the home loan component of the GI Bill, which had a profound influence on home construction and the ensuing development of suburbs, remained out of reach for many people of color, including American Indian veterans. Based on the policies and programs of the Federal Housing Administration, the VA’s administration of its housing programs has rendered American Indians as incompatible with veteran status due to bureaucratic red tape and inconsistencies, racism, and the status of reservation trust land. In this paper I contend that American Indian veterans are regularly prevented from using their earned military home loan benefits because of the complicated nature of on-reservation Indian trust land that makes securing and insuring a mortgage difficult. Further, I argue that off-reservation American Indian veterans are often forced to reconcile VA and BIA programs for which they are eligible and entitled.

2009 - NCA 95th Annual Convention Words: 251 words || 
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2. Braithwaite, Charles. "'I’m an Indian Inside': Russian Interpretations of American Indian Powwows in Bea Medicine’s Seeking the Spirit: Plains Indians in Russia" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the NCA 95th Annual Convention, Chicago Hilton & Towers, Chicago, IL, <Not Available>. 2020-01-27 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p368215_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Directed by Liucija Baskauskas and produced by Bea Medicine, the film “Seeking the spirit: Plains Indians in Russia” (2005) shows a group of Russians and Lithuanians holding a powwow outside of St. Petersburg. Several hundred men, women and children create an “Indian village” and
powwow arena in a Russian forest where they live and dance for a month each summer. What is unique about this documentary of the Russian “powwow” is the producer’s decision to take the raw footage of the Russians and show it to Ogallala Lakota back in South Dakota, USA. The film then shows the Indian reactions to watching the Russian’s interpretations of American Indian culture. This paper explicates the Russian views on why they want to “be like Indians” and why they believe there is a similarity between their culture and what they think is central to “Indian culture.” This includes their views on modern life, the relationship of humans to nature, and the
choices made for coping with a changing world. American Indian interpretations of the Russian versions of Indian culture include discussions of the way cultural artifacts and used and misused, and their views on whether one culture should try to emulate another. In addition to this exegesis of Seeking the spirit, descriptions are provided of the reaction Indians from other Plains tribes have to the film as a whole. U-Mo'n-Ho'n (Omaha), Ho-Chunk (Winnebago), Ponca, and Santee students provide their interpretation of the Ogallala Lakota interpretations of the Russian interpretations of Indians.

2016 - National Women's Studies Association Words: 103 words || 
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3. Patel, Shaista. "Indian on ‘Indian’? Examining Questions of Coloniality and Anti-Blackness in An Indian from India" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the National Women's Studies Association, Palais des congrès de Montréal, Montreal, Quebec, <Not Available>. 2020-01-27 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1142170_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Abstract: I will examine a photographic series called An Indian from India by Annu Palakunnathu Matthew, an Indian-American photographer and scholar. Her series is a parody of early 20th century photographs of Native Americans where she replaces or juxtaposes subjects of American Empire's photographers by herself, playing on the 'Indianness' of the people 'mis-identified' as Indians (Forbes, 2007). I will examine her play on photographs of a Black-Indigenous man, Ho-tul-ko-micco aka Silas Jefferson to think through questions of gendered complicity of South Asians in processes of white settler colonialism and anti-Blackness (Lawrence & Dua, 2005; Patel, Upadhyay & Moussa, 2015).

2010 - Theory vs. Policy? Connecting Scholars and Practitioners Pages: 22 pages || Words: 6856 words || 
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4. Mishra, Digambar., Barik, Niranjan. and Mishra, Josna. "Intermestics in Hustings and 2009 Electoral Verdict in the Indian Polity: A Post - Poll Empirical Study of Perceptions of College Youth in an Indian City" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Theory vs. Policy? Connecting Scholars and Practitioners, New Orleans Hilton Riverside Hotel, The Loews New Orleans Hotel, New Orleans, LA, Feb 17, 2010 Online <PDF>. 2020-01-27 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p413138_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The largest democracy in the world had one of the greatest electoral exercises in 2009- of nearly 700 million voters going to booths to electronically elect their government in five phases spread over nearly a month. The two major pre-poll coalitions- Uni

2015 - The Native American and Indigenous Studies Association Words: 249 words || 
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5. Sweet, Jameson. "Land, Indian Women, and the Influence of White Husbands in Indian Affairs" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Native American and Indigenous Studies Association, Hyatt Regency on Capitol Hill, Washington, D.C., <Not Available>. 2020-01-27 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p983204_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: In this paper, I examine the acquisition of land on the Great Nemaha Half-Breed Reservation in southeastern Nebraska in the 1850s by Dakota women with Euro-American husbands. These women had varying levels of success in gaining and exerting control over their land, as evidenced in their testimony, their role in signing petitions to the federal government over land disputes, and selling their land. Although limited, those women who obtained allotments exercised some level of agency, while those who did not relied even more on their White husbands for their livelihoods. Unlike unmarried women or Indian women married to Indian men, they quickly found that they were subject to coverture laws, taxation, and the whims of their husbands. Their White husbands and local governments held an inordinate amount of power in regulating what was essentially Indian land held in the name of Indian women, but in some situations, women successfully employed agency in their land dealings. I examine the lives of two women, Margaret Hart, who successfully acquired an allotment and Josette Dorian, who did not. While Margaret’s husband, as guardian, sold the land of their children, Margaret sold most of her land in her own name. She also signed a petition to the federal government over fraudulent land claims, and after the death of her husband, successfully managed her own affairs for fifty years. Josette failed to acquire an allotment and relied on the actions of her White husband who exerted much more power than she in Indian affairs.

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