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2016 - Native American and Indigenous Studies Association Annual Conference Words: 236 words || 
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1. Keeler, Kasey. "Indian Homes and Indian Loans: American Indian Veterans and Inaccessible VA Home Loan Benefits" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Native American and Indigenous Studies Association Annual Conference, Ala Moana Hotel, Honolulu, Hawaii, May 18, 2016 <Not Available>. 2019-09-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1102325_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In this paper I interrogate the language, goals, and implementation of VA housing programs from the GI Bill of 1944 to today’s Native American Direct Loan to examine the ways American Indians have been prevented from accessing VA housing benefits. The GI Bill of 1944, also known as the Servicemen’s Readjustment Act, significantly altered and shaped the economic outlook for the entire country setting in motion housing development for the remainder of the century. Since WWII, the GI Bill has been reproduced and redesigned to provide education programs, health care, and temporary financial assistance to veterans. Yet the home loan component of the GI Bill, which had a profound influence on home construction and the ensuing development of suburbs, remained out of reach for many people of color, including American Indian veterans. Based on the policies and programs of the Federal Housing Administration, the VA’s administration of its housing programs has rendered American Indians as incompatible with veteran status due to bureaucratic red tape and inconsistencies, racism, and the status of reservation trust land. In this paper I contend that American Indian veterans are regularly prevented from using their earned military home loan benefits because of the complicated nature of on-reservation Indian trust land that makes securing and insuring a mortgage difficult. Further, I argue that off-reservation American Indian veterans are often forced to reconcile VA and BIA programs for which they are eligible and entitled.

2016 - National Women's Studies Association Words: 103 words || 
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2. Patel, Shaista. "Indian on ‘Indian’? Examining Questions of Coloniality and Anti-Blackness in An Indian from India" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the National Women's Studies Association, Palais des congrès de Montréal, Montreal, Quebec, <Not Available>. 2019-09-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1142170_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Abstract: I will examine a photographic series called An Indian from India by Annu Palakunnathu Matthew, an Indian-American photographer and scholar. Her series is a parody of early 20th century photographs of Native Americans where she replaces or juxtaposes subjects of American Empire's photographers by herself, playing on the 'Indianness' of the people 'mis-identified' as Indians (Forbes, 2007). I will examine her play on photographs of a Black-Indigenous man, Ho-tul-ko-micco aka Silas Jefferson to think through questions of gendered complicity of South Asians in processes of white settler colonialism and anti-Blackness (Lawrence & Dua, 2005; Patel, Upadhyay & Moussa, 2015).

2009 - NCA 95th Annual Convention Words: 251 words || 
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3. Braithwaite, Charles. "'I’m an Indian Inside': Russian Interpretations of American Indian Powwows in Bea Medicine’s Seeking the Spirit: Plains Indians in Russia" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the NCA 95th Annual Convention, Chicago Hilton & Towers, Chicago, IL, <Not Available>. 2019-09-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p368215_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Directed by Liucija Baskauskas and produced by Bea Medicine, the film “Seeking the spirit: Plains Indians in Russia” (2005) shows a group of Russians and Lithuanians holding a powwow outside of St. Petersburg. Several hundred men, women and children create an “Indian village” and
powwow arena in a Russian forest where they live and dance for a month each summer. What is unique about this documentary of the Russian “powwow” is the producer’s decision to take the raw footage of the Russians and show it to Ogallala Lakota back in South Dakota, USA. The film then shows the Indian reactions to watching the Russian’s interpretations of American Indian culture. This paper explicates the Russian views on why they want to “be like Indians” and why they believe there is a similarity between their culture and what they think is central to “Indian culture.” This includes their views on modern life, the relationship of humans to nature, and the
choices made for coping with a changing world. American Indian interpretations of the Russian versions of Indian culture include discussions of the way cultural artifacts and used and misused, and their views on whether one culture should try to emulate another. In addition to this exegesis of Seeking the spirit, descriptions are provided of the reaction Indians from other Plains tribes have to the film as a whole. U-Mo'n-Ho'n (Omaha), Ho-Chunk (Winnebago), Ponca, and Santee students provide their interpretation of the Ogallala Lakota interpretations of the Russian interpretations of Indians.

2016 - Native American and Indigenous Studies Association Annual Conference Words: 200 words || 
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4. Gonzales, Greg. "“Let him be an Indian still:” Race, Citizenship, and federal Indian education in northern New Mexico and the National Archives" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Native American and Indigenous Studies Association Annual Conference, Ala Moana Hotel, Honolulu, Hawaii, May 18, 2016 <Not Available>. 2019-09-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1105585_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper examines the development and enforcement of federal Indian education policy in northern New Mexico during the late-nineteenth and early-twentieth centuries. Particularly, it explores how children from the Pueblo de Abiquiú were enrolled and expelled from the U.S. Indian Industrial School in Santa Fe, New Mexico. Equally, this analysis considers how federal Indian school administrators and Indian agency officials “made sense” of Abiquiú existences and presences within the parameters of race, ethnicity, citizenship, and federal Indian policy. As a community whose history remains saturated in strategic policies of violence targeting primarily Native women and children to be traded and sold in the region’s robust Indigenous slave trade, the Pueblo de Abiquiú maintains its contested history and continued legacy as a Genízaro Pueblo whose Indigeneity remains unrecognized by the U.S. federal government. Conducting an exhaustive archival research agenda at the National Archives in Washington, D.C., and its regional center in Denver, Colorado, this paper intends to illustrate a complex field of power relations being engaged, negotiated, and challenged by Abiquiú youth and their families, while equally attending to the structuration of intelligible, distinctly Indigenous “livable lives” being articulated by a wide array of stakeholders at local, regional, and national levels.

2016 - American Studies Association Annual Meeting Words: 340 words || 
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5. Suarez, Sasha. "Indian Minneapolis: (Re)claiming Indigenous Space Through the Building of Urban American Indian Infrastructure" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Studies Association Annual Meeting, TBA, Denver, Colorado, Nov 17, 2016 <Not Available>. 2019-09-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1133074_index.html>
Publication Type: Internal Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper considers how the growing American Indian community in Minneapolis, Minnesota enacted a process of (re)claiming indigenous space in the 1960s and 1970s through the building of communal infrastructure. Prior to federal Relocation policy of the mid-twentieth century, the American Indian population of Minneapolis was relatively small in comparison to the city’s non-Native demographics. Though not an official Relocation site, Minneapolis experienced a growth in its Indian population in the 1960s and 1970s. This influx of American Indian peoples exposed a particular need for services that catered to this distinct population whose unique political rights as members of sovereign nations with specific cultural values were often discarded by non-Natives in an urban setting. I argue that through the building of community infrastructure, present in the establishment of Indian Centers, Indian businesses, Little Earth, the first Native-preference housing project in the country, and through the creation of schools and Native educational programming, the American Indian community in Minneapolis enacted a process of (re)claiming Minneapolis as indigenous space. For Dakota, this was a process of reclaiming homelands and their histories, a process of fighting erasure enacted by settler-colonial narratives. For Ojibwe of Northern Minnesota, this was a process of claiming Minneapolis as an indigenous space away from reservation homelands. Together, through intertribal efforts to build physical space for Native peoples, community-building activists worked to mitigate the erasure of indigenous peoples in Minnesota and within Minneapolis. Through an exploration of this critical era that influenced present day American Indian community in Minneapolis, I posit that (re)claiming urban spaces created a strong intertribal culture that changed indigenous conceptions of identity. By (re)claiming Minneapolis as indigenous space, intertribal Native community marked Minneapolis as a place in which indigenous peoples had histories and contemporary lives as urban indigenous peoples. Through a study of historic archival documents regarding the building of such infrastructure as well as through personally conducted oral histories, this paper traces the ways in which Indians in Minneapolis made and remade Minneapolis into a home for American Indian peoples in the twentieth century.

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