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2008 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: 20 pages || Words: 4543 words || 
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1. Maimon, David. and Browning, Christopher. "Unstructured Socializing, Collective Efficacy and Individual’s Violent Behavior: Integrating Individual and Structural Level Explanations of Crime." Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Sheraton Boston and the Boston Marriott Copley Place, Boston, MA, Jul 31, 2008 Online <PDF>. 2018-04-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p240942_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Relying on innovative extensions of both the routine activities (Osgood et al. 1996) and the social disorganization perspectives (Sampson et al. 1997), we test the hypothesis that unstructured socializing leads to increases in violent behavior within urban communities. We also examine whether living within a high collective efficacy neighborhood reduces the impact of unstructured socializing on violence. This paper uses three waves of data from the Project on Human Development in Chicago’s Neighborhoods Community and Longitudinal Surveys. Results from a two level hierarchical liner models with robust standard error support our hypothesis, suggesting that dwelling within a high collective efficacy neighborhood attenuates the effect of unstructured socializing on violent behavior.

2009 - Midwest Political Science Association 67th Annual National Conference Pages: 35 pages || Words: 9541 words || 
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2. Hanagan, Nora. "Individual Responsibility or Irresponsible Individualism: Re-examining Thoreau's political ethics" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Midwest Political Science Association 67th Annual National Conference, The Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, IL, Apr 02, 2009 Online <PDF>. 2018-04-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p360884_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper examines the relationship between responsibility and liberalism. It does so by examining Henry David Thoreau’s account of the individual’s responsibility for the impact that her actions have upon others, one of the most inspiring and demanding accounts associated with the liberal tradition. Particular attention will be paid to Thoreau’s travel literature which has only recently attracted the attention of political theorists, and which provides a more complex and nuanced account of the individual’s relationship to society than is found in Thoreau’s more overtly political writings. While Thoreau’s account of responsibility relies upon the liberal assumption that political society is a contract among consenting individuals, it is also influenced by a variety of moral, literary and philosophic resources. As this paper will demonstrate, Thoreau’s attention to history, community, and character-formation, along with his playfulness and rejection of Cartesian subjectivity mean that his account of responsibility is less vulnerable to communitarian and neo- Nietzschean objections than many other prominent liberal accounts.

2012 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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3. Ketokivi, Kaisa. and Meskus, Mianna. "Beyond “the Individual”: Historical and Relational Ontologies of Individuality" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Colorado Convention Center and Hyatt Regency, Denver, CO, Aug 16, 2012 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2018-04-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p564338_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The notion of “individual” as the counterpoint to “the social” is at the core of sociological thinking and analysis. It has multiple implications and modalities directing us to think people, actions and practices through qualities of “being conscious, independent, autonomous, free and responsible”(Mauss 1938). While “the individual” is often presupposed as an entity, its critics claim it to be an idea with no substance. Instead of either presupposing or fully rejecting individuality, we go beyond “the individual” and empirically analyze the variegated and fluid ontologies of individuality from historical and relational viewpoints. Historical analysis of the institutionalization of choice and autonomy in medical practice demonstrates the historical contingency of individuality. Relational analysis of selves’ personal narratives and figurations of significant relationships shows how individualities are interdependent on the bonding effects with others. Both analyses suggest ontologies of individuality that do not emerge from bounded individuals, but in relational and historical processes. As sociologists, we are left with the dilemma of how to deal with the ontological contingency of individuality.

2014 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 13405 words || 
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4. Evans, Mariah. and Kelley, Jonathan. "Societal Inequality and Individual Subjective Well-being: Results from 96 Societies and 300,000 Individuals, 1981-2008" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton San Francisco Union Square and Parc 55 Wyndham San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, Aug 15, 2014 Online <PDF>. 2018-04-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p723062_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Income inequality has been contentious for millennia, a source of political conflict for centuries, and is now widely feared as an undesirable accompaniment to economic progress. But equality is only a means to an end and so must be evaluated by its consequences. The fundamental question is: Empirically what consequence does a nation's level of income inequality have for its citizens' well-being? We find that the answer depends on the society. In developing nations not previously Communist, inequality is probably beneficial, certainly not harmful. In advanced nations it is irrelevant. Only for cohorts passing their formative years under Communism does inequality reduce well-being; for new generations in post-Communist societies it is irrelevant, or possibly beneficial. Data are from the pooled World Values/European Values Surveys, 247 representative national samples in 96 nations, 1981 to 2009, with over 330,000 respondents. Analysis is by variance-components multilevel models.

2016 - ICA's 66th Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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5. Benefield, Grace. and Shen, Cuihua. "Group and Individual Network Measures Predict Individual Performance in an MMOG" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ICA's 66th Annual Conference, Hilton Fukuoka Sea Hawk, Fukuoka, Japan, Jun 09, 2016 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2018-04-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1107815_index.html>
Publication Type: Extended Abstract
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In this study, individual-level and group-level network effects are tested against individual performance in a Massively Multiplayer Online Game. Across three distinct types of networks, the preliminary results suggests that there are individual costs to being centrally located in the character-character network, but there are some individual performance benefits to being a member of a guild with ideal intra- and inter-group network structures.

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