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2012 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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1. Ketokivi, Kaisa. and Meskus, Mianna. "Beyond “the Individual”: Historical and Relational Ontologies of Individuality" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Colorado Convention Center and Hyatt Regency, Denver, CO, Aug 16, 2012 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2018-09-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p564338_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The notion of “individual” as the counterpoint to “the social” is at the core of sociological thinking and analysis. It has multiple implications and modalities directing us to think people, actions and practices through qualities of “being conscious, independent, autonomous, free and responsible”(Mauss 1938). While “the individual” is often presupposed as an entity, its critics claim it to be an idea with no substance. Instead of either presupposing or fully rejecting individuality, we go beyond “the individual” and empirically analyze the variegated and fluid ontologies of individuality from historical and relational viewpoints. Historical analysis of the institutionalization of choice and autonomy in medical practice demonstrates the historical contingency of individuality. Relational analysis of selves’ personal narratives and figurations of significant relationships shows how individualities are interdependent on the bonding effects with others. Both analyses suggest ontologies of individuality that do not emerge from bounded individuals, but in relational and historical processes. As sociologists, we are left with the dilemma of how to deal with the ontological contingency of individuality.

2014 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 13405 words || 
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2. Evans, Mariah. and Kelley, Jonathan. "Societal Inequality and Individual Subjective Well-being: Results from 96 Societies and 300,000 Individuals, 1981-2008" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton San Francisco Union Square and Parc 55 Wyndham San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, Aug 15, 2014 Online <PDF>. 2018-09-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p723062_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Income inequality has been contentious for millennia, a source of political conflict for centuries, and is now widely feared as an undesirable accompaniment to economic progress. But equality is only a means to an end and so must be evaluated by its consequences. The fundamental question is: Empirically what consequence does a nation's level of income inequality have for its citizens' well-being? We find that the answer depends on the society. In developing nations not previously Communist, inequality is probably beneficial, certainly not harmful. In advanced nations it is irrelevant. Only for cohorts passing their formative years under Communism does inequality reduce well-being; for new generations in post-Communist societies it is irrelevant, or possibly beneficial. Data are from the pooled World Values/European Values Surveys, 247 representative national samples in 96 nations, 1981 to 2009, with over 330,000 respondents. Analysis is by variance-components multilevel models.

2016 - ICA's 66th Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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3. Benefield, Grace. and Shen, Cuihua. "Group and Individual Network Measures Predict Individual Performance in an MMOG" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ICA's 66th Annual Conference, Hilton Fukuoka Sea Hawk, Fukuoka, Japan, Jun 09, 2016 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2018-09-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1107815_index.html>
Publication Type: Extended Abstract
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In this study, individual-level and group-level network effects are tested against individual performance in a Massively Multiplayer Online Game. Across three distinct types of networks, the preliminary results suggests that there are individual costs to being centrally located in the character-character network, but there are some individual performance benefits to being a member of a guild with ideal intra- and inter-group network structures.

2015 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 8187 words || 
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4. Choi, HwaJung., Elo, Irma. and Heisler, Michele. "Are Individuals Living in More Equal Counties Healthier than Individuals Living in More Unequal Counties?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton Chicago and Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, Illinois, Aug 20, 2015 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2018-09-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1006585_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Using a propensity score matching technique, we examined the contextual effect of income inequality on health. After removing those who newly/recently moved into the area (<5 years), we further assessed which SES group showed an association between income inequality and health.
Bivariate analysis results from the unmatched sample show that adults living in high income-inequality counties have poorer health in all health measures (SRH, ADL, IADL, blood pressure, CESD, stroke, diabetes, psychiatric problem) except for heart problem. After propensity score matching, only the adverse association with self-rated health status (SRH) remained statistically significant at the 5% level. Psychiatric problems were also significantly more prevalent for adults living in high income-inequality counties when we compare adults who lived in the area at least 15 years. The significant association with poorer SRHS is likely to be observed between 40th and 80th wealth percentiles, between 40th and 90th income percentiles, and among individuals without college education.
The question of whether income inequality has a causal effect on health has been argued for several decades. Our findings suggest adverse effect of income inequality may exist in terms of self-rated general health status and psychiatric problem for middle- and high- economic groups (except for very high).

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