Guest  

 
Search: 
Search By: SubjectAbstractAuthorTitleFull-Text

 

Showing 1 through 5 of 2,819 records.
Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 564 - Next  Jump:
2017 - American Society of Criminology Words: 198 words || 
Info
1. Mowen, Thomas. and Boman, John. "The Role of Baseline Between-Individual Differences in Understanding Within-Individual Changes in Life-Course Criminology" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Criminology, Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Philadelphia, PA, Nov 14, 2017 <Not Available>. 2018-07-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1277238_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Turning points in life—between-person differences and within-person changes—have both been linked to desistance from crime. However, the means through which between-person differences are frequently captured in life-course criminology makes them intertwined with turning points in life. We propose that baseline between-person differences are instead more theoretically relevant. Occurring at one point in time, we demonstrate that baseline between-person differences establish meaningful theoretical connections to behavior and within-person change over time. Using a large-scale reentry dataset, we estimate a series of models capturing within-person change and baseline between-person differences in social bonds (family support) and differential association (peer criminality) at the time of release from prison. Results demonstrate that baseline levels of family support protect people from post-release substance use, but not crime. Instead, within-person increases in family support protect from crime. However, baseline between-person differences and within-person changes in peer criminality are robustly related to crime and substance abuse. Despite this, the detrimental effect of high baseline levels of peer criminality is offset by within-person increases in family support. Collectively, baseline-between person differences appear critical for behavior and within-person change over time, and results carry implications for reentry policy as well as theory testing in developmental criminology.

2005 - American Political Science Association Pages: 44 pages || Words: 11756 words || 
Info
2. Krishna, Anirudh. "Do Poor People Care Less for Democracy? Testing Individual-Level Assumptions with Individual-Level Data" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Marriott Wardman Park, Omni Shoreham, Washington Hilton, Washington, DC, Sep 01, 2005 <Not Available>. 2018-07-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p41856_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: A robust macro-level association has been observed between economic development and democratic stability, but why this association should hold remains unexplained in terms of micro-foundations. One set of hypotheses proposes individual preferences as the missing causal link: preferences for democracy are stronger when individuals’ material status is better. Lack of individual-level data on poverty has so far precluded empirical tests of this hypothesis. With the help of an original dataset from 61 north Indian villages, including interviews with more than 2,000 individuals, I show that preferences for democracy are not significantly associated with material wellbeing. Neither faith in democracy nor political efficacy or participation rates are related to differences in material status. Democracy can be strongly supported even when poverty is large in a country.

2014 - Annual Scientific Meeting of the International Society of Political Psychology Words: 197 words || 
Info
3. Federico, Christopher. "Moral Intuition as an Epistemic Provider: Asymmetry and Variability in the Relationship Between Individual Traits and Binding and Individualizing Moral Concerns" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Annual Scientific Meeting of the International Society of Political Psychology, Ergife Palace Hotel, Rome, Italy, <Not Available>. 2018-07-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p725846_index.html>
Publication Type: Paper (prepared oral presentation)
Abstract: Morality has long been thought of as an "epistemic provider," insofar as moral rules allow individuals to achieve a sense of certainty and order. This suggests that individual differences related to needs for certainty and order may be associated with greater concern about morality. This may be especially true with respect to moral concerns that promote group cohesion (Kruglanski et al., 2006). However, we argue that this should not be equally the case for all aspects of morality or all traits linked to preferences regarding certainty and order. We predict that the need for cognitive closure—which taps a desire for definite knowledge and the avoidance of ambiguity—will strongly predict support for “binding” moral concerns (ingroup loyalty, respect for authority, purity) but not “individualizing” ones (harm avoidance, fairness), since the former deal most closely with the group uniformity and cohesion that allows groups to provide certainty. In contrast, openness to experience—which taps curiosity and attraction to novelty—will strongly predict support for individualizing but not binding concerns, since fairness and harm avoidance may promote order and respect in the diverse settings those high in openness are attracted to. In three datasets, we find strong support for these hypotheses.

2012 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
Info
4. Ketokivi, Kaisa. and Meskus, Mianna. "Beyond “the Individual”: Historical and Relational Ontologies of Individuality" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Colorado Convention Center and Hyatt Regency, Denver, CO, Aug 16, 2012 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2018-07-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p564338_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The notion of “individual” as the counterpoint to “the social” is at the core of sociological thinking and analysis. It has multiple implications and modalities directing us to think people, actions and practices through qualities of “being conscious, independent, autonomous, free and responsible”(Mauss 1938). While “the individual” is often presupposed as an entity, its critics claim it to be an idea with no substance. Instead of either presupposing or fully rejecting individuality, we go beyond “the individual” and empirically analyze the variegated and fluid ontologies of individuality from historical and relational viewpoints. Historical analysis of the institutionalization of choice and autonomy in medical practice demonstrates the historical contingency of individuality. Relational analysis of selves’ personal narratives and figurations of significant relationships shows how individualities are interdependent on the bonding effects with others. Both analyses suggest ontologies of individuality that do not emerge from bounded individuals, but in relational and historical processes. As sociologists, we are left with the dilemma of how to deal with the ontological contingency of individuality.

2014 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 13405 words || 
Info
5. Evans, Mariah. and Kelley, Jonathan. "Societal Inequality and Individual Subjective Well-being: Results from 96 Societies and 300,000 Individuals, 1981-2008" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton San Francisco Union Square and Parc 55 Wyndham San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, Aug 15, 2014 Online <PDF>. 2018-07-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p723062_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Income inequality has been contentious for millennia, a source of political conflict for centuries, and is now widely feared as an undesirable accompaniment to economic progress. But equality is only a means to an end and so must be evaluated by its consequences. The fundamental question is: Empirically what consequence does a nation's level of income inequality have for its citizens' well-being? We find that the answer depends on the society. In developing nations not previously Communist, inequality is probably beneficial, certainly not harmful. In advanced nations it is irrelevant. Only for cohorts passing their formative years under Communism does inequality reduce well-being; for new generations in post-Communist societies it is irrelevant, or possibly beneficial. Data are from the pooled World Values/European Values Surveys, 247 representative national samples in 96 nations, 1981 to 2009, with over 330,000 respondents. Analysis is by variance-components multilevel models.

Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 564 - Next  Jump:

©2018 All Academic, Inc.   |   All Academic Privacy Policy