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2009 - NCA 95th Annual Convention Pages: unavailable || Words: 12634 words || 
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1. Matsunaga, Masaki. "Individual Dispositions and Interpersonal Concerns Underlying Bullied Individuals' Disclosure of their Victimized Status: A Japan-U.S. Cross-Cultural Investigation" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the NCA 95th Annual Convention, Chicago Hilton & Towers, Chicago, IL, Nov 11, 2009 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2018-12-12 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p320335_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This study examined bullied victims’ coping through self-disclosure (N = 503). Structural equation mixture modeling analysis revealed: (a) victims’ disclosure/non-disclosure patterns are linked to self/other-protection concerns; (b) those concerns can be traced to victims’ self-construal and communication standards; and (d) disclosure enhanced post-bullying adjustment. Japanese victims are primarily concerned with other-protection, whereas U.S. Americans are primarily driven by self-protection concerns. Victims benefit most by disclosing to both best friends and families.

2010 - UCEA Annual Convention Words: 261 words || 
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2. Pazey, Barbara., Altantawy, Marwa Alsaman Altantawy., Lockhart, Anecia., Shin, Dae Eun., Ji, Eun. and Parudani, Iyehezkiel. "Creating an Inclusive Environment for Individuals with Disabilities: A Cultural and International Perspective of Issues Related to the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) and Section 504" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the UCEA Annual Convention, Sheraton New Orleans, New Orleans, Louisiana, <Not Available>. 2018-12-12 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p438040_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Social justice has been advanced as a primary theme in the preparation and training of educational leaders. (Young et al., 2009). However, a scant supply of research pertaining to how leaders are facilitating educational programs for students with disabilities and how universities are addressing areas related to individuals with disabilities currently exists (McCarthy & Forsythe, 2009). Have we really listened to the voices, needs and interests of individuals with disabilities? Or, have we marginalized a population of individuals who represent 10 to 15 percent of the population we serve and who cut across every other category of difference, including race, class, age, gender, sexual orientation, and language? This session purports to expand our understanding of social knowledge as it relates to educational leadership through a comparative and international perspective of two major acts of legislation for students and individuals with disabilities: the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act. Five graduate students with and without disabilities and/or who represent Korea, Egypt, and Indonesia will present their own perspectives of the importance of understanding and hearing their voices as they pertain to inclusion, transition planning, and the provision of an equitable and excellent education. As a collective whole, we will explore how we can create a social justice curriculum that incorporates the voices and experiences of special population groups and individuals with disabilities and endeavors to “build a new social order” that empowers them to be self advocates and active participants and catalysts to guide further inquiry and practice.

2005 - American Political Science Association Pages: 44 pages || Words: 11756 words || 
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3. Krishna, Anirudh. "Do Poor People Care Less for Democracy? Testing Individual-Level Assumptions with Individual-Level Data" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Marriott Wardman Park, Omni Shoreham, Washington Hilton, Washington, DC, Sep 01, 2005 <Not Available>. 2018-12-12 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p41856_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: A robust macro-level association has been observed between economic development and democratic stability, but why this association should hold remains unexplained in terms of micro-foundations. One set of hypotheses proposes individual preferences as the missing causal link: preferences for democracy are stronger when individuals’ material status is better. Lack of individual-level data on poverty has so far precluded empirical tests of this hypothesis. With the help of an original dataset from 61 north Indian villages, including interviews with more than 2,000 individuals, I show that preferences for democracy are not significantly associated with material wellbeing. Neither faith in democracy nor political efficacy or participation rates are related to differences in material status. Democracy can be strongly supported even when poverty is large in a country.

2014 - Annual Scientific Meeting of the International Society of Political Psychology Words: 197 words || 
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4. Federico, Christopher. "Moral Intuition as an Epistemic Provider: Asymmetry and Variability in the Relationship Between Individual Traits and Binding and Individualizing Moral Concerns" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Annual Scientific Meeting of the International Society of Political Psychology, Ergife Palace Hotel, Rome, Italy, <Not Available>. 2018-12-12 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p725846_index.html>
Publication Type: Paper (prepared oral presentation)
Abstract: Morality has long been thought of as an "epistemic provider," insofar as moral rules allow individuals to achieve a sense of certainty and order. This suggests that individual differences related to needs for certainty and order may be associated with greater concern about morality. This may be especially true with respect to moral concerns that promote group cohesion (Kruglanski et al., 2006). However, we argue that this should not be equally the case for all aspects of morality or all traits linked to preferences regarding certainty and order. We predict that the need for cognitive closure—which taps a desire for definite knowledge and the avoidance of ambiguity—will strongly predict support for “binding” moral concerns (ingroup loyalty, respect for authority, purity) but not “individualizing” ones (harm avoidance, fairness), since the former deal most closely with the group uniformity and cohesion that allows groups to provide certainty. In contrast, openness to experience—which taps curiosity and attraction to novelty—will strongly predict support for individualizing but not binding concerns, since fairness and harm avoidance may promote order and respect in the diverse settings those high in openness are attracted to. In three datasets, we find strong support for these hypotheses.

2012 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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5. Ketokivi, Kaisa. and Meskus, Mianna. "Beyond “the Individual”: Historical and Relational Ontologies of Individuality" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Colorado Convention Center and Hyatt Regency, Denver, CO, Aug 16, 2012 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2018-12-12 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p564338_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The notion of “individual” as the counterpoint to “the social” is at the core of sociological thinking and analysis. It has multiple implications and modalities directing us to think people, actions and practices through qualities of “being conscious, independent, autonomous, free and responsible”(Mauss 1938). While “the individual” is often presupposed as an entity, its critics claim it to be an idea with no substance. Instead of either presupposing or fully rejecting individuality, we go beyond “the individual” and empirically analyze the variegated and fluid ontologies of individuality from historical and relational viewpoints. Historical analysis of the institutionalization of choice and autonomy in medical practice demonstrates the historical contingency of individuality. Relational analysis of selves’ personal narratives and figurations of significant relationships shows how individualities are interdependent on the bonding effects with others. Both analyses suggest ontologies of individuality that do not emerge from bounded individuals, but in relational and historical processes. As sociologists, we are left with the dilemma of how to deal with the ontological contingency of individuality.

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