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2006 - American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education Pages: 4 pages || Words: 1525 words || 
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1. Rhoads, Judie. "Transfer of Learning From Course Instruction Through Implementation of the Teacher Work Sample. Is Online Course Instruction as Effective as Traditional Instruction?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education, Jan 26, 2006 Online <PDF>. 2020-02-24 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p36332_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This study examines whether preservice teachers transfer assessment skills learned in university coursework to their final student teaching experience. Comparisons between traditional and online course delivery models will be made.

2010 - Oklahoma Research Day Words: 194 words || 
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2. Ridlen, Trey. and Knight, Angela. "Transformative Instruction Versus Online Instruction: How Linguistic Inquiry Demonstrates a Difference in Word Usage" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Oklahoma Research Day, Cameron University, Lawton, OK, Nov 12, 2010 <Not Available>. 2020-02-24 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p484370_index.html>
Publication Type: Abstract
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The Linguistic Inquiry and Word Count (LIWC) is a computer program that measures social words, emotional words, cognitive clarity, and the complexities in human writing (Pennebaker, Booth, and Francis, 2001). Transformative Learning Pedagogy suggests that the students should be transforming into independent thinkers, independent thinking creates greater autonomy (Mezirow, 2000). Transformative Pedagogy, implemented in the Psychology of Grief class, sought to verify the benefits of Transformative Learning with the LIWC program. Students in the fall 2010 turned in writing assignments, which asked for the student’s thoughts and knowledge over a specific week’s instruction. We gave the same assignment to an online version of Psychology of Grief and while students received the same informational content, the online students did not experience Transformative Pedagogy. Both classes writing assignments, ran though the LIWC, reveled a higher word count for students attending the Grief class with Transformative pedagogy. The online Grief class used fewer words with the same writing assignment. Likewise, cognitive words, community words and achievement words are higher in the Transformative Learning Grief class, than in the online control class. LIWC results demonstrate Transformative Learning’s Pedagogy impacts student learning, evidenced by student words usage.

2014 - Tenth Annual Congress of Qualitative Inquiry Words: 159 words || 
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3. Macbeth, Ddouglas. and Yahsi, Zekiye. "Instruction in Real Time: Novitiate Instruction as a Practical Enactment" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Tenth Annual Congress of Qualitative Inquiry, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois, May 21, 2014 <Not Available>. 2020-02-24 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p719711_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Produced in real time, interaction is instruction’s medium, and shows a sequential organization; sequences ‘progress’. The question for novitiate instruction is roughly: How can they? How can those who don’t know their lesson produce a lesson’s next turn? The puzzle is not for them; classrooms routinely show congregational solutions. It is rather an analytic puzzle for us. And when we press it, we very quickly run into the unremarkable organizations of classroom questions and answers, and are led to ask: By what resources endogenous to a question’s production, as resources for understanding the kind of question it is, do we answer? These are descriptive questions that lie on the ‘surfaces’ of classroom interaction. Using resources from natural language study, sequential analysis and ethnomethodology, this paper examines a lesson on fractions presented to a class of students who do not yet know how to produce them. Yet, they do.

2013 - International Communication Association Pages: unavailable || Words: 10461 words || 
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4. LaBelle, Sara., Martin, Matthew. and Weber, Keith. "Instructional Dissent in the College Classroom: A Test of the Instructional Beliefs Model" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Hilton Metropole Hotel, London, England, Jun 17, 2013 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2020-02-24 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p633651_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: We sought to examine the impact of instructor characteristics and student beliefs on students’ decisions to enact instructional dissent using the Instructional Beliefs Model (IBM: Weber, Martin, & Myers, 2011) as a framework. Students (N = 244) completed survey questionnaires assessing their perceptions of instructors’ clarity, nonverbal immediacy, and affirming style, as well as their own academic self efficacy and communicative behaviors following a disagreement or difference of opinion with the instructor. Results of path analyses indicate that students’ academic self efficacy mediates the relationship between instructor behaviors and two communicative outcomes of instructional dissent, thus supporting the use of the IBM with these variables. These results provide insight on instructional dissent and suggest the extension of the IBM to explore additional communicative outcomes beyond learning in instructional communication research.

2013 - 57th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society Words: 516 words || 
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5. Hamm, Molly., Martinez, Rebeca. and DeLaura, Catherine. "Transitioning from Assessment to Instruction: Data, Professional Development, and Instructional Change in the Dominican Republic" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 57th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society, Hilton Riverside Hotel, New Orleans, LA, <Not Available>. 2020-02-24 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p657710_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Molly Hamm, Planning and Research Coordinator, The DREAM Project, mollymhamm@gmail.com
Rebeca Martinez, Education Programs Coordinator, The DREAM Project, rebecajeanne@gmail.com
Catherine DeLaura, Executive Director, The DREAM Project, catherine@dominicandream.org

While the Millennium Development Goals and other international targets often place an emphasis on quantitative measures of education quality—counting the number of students enrolled and the parity of those enrollment rates, for example—the international education community has long argued that an increase in school attendance will produce limited development outcomes if the quality of schooling experiences and their related outcomes are not improved. An increased focus on education quality has brought literacy into the forefront of development initiatives. The benefits of literacy are well-documented as contributing positively to the quality of life of individuals and communities, bringing human benefits (self-esteem, empowerment, creativity, critical reflection), political benefits (political participation and democracy), cultural benefits (changes in attitudes, behaviors, and values), social benefits (improved health, education, and socio-emotional outcomes), and economic benefits (increased individual income and economic growth) (UNESCO 2006). Yet the concept of literacy—what it means to be literate, how one becomes literate, how that literacy can be measured, and what literacy development and instruction should look like—is one of the most historically contested topics in educational policy and practice. Additionally, in the field of literacy, there is the potential for assessment and instructional practices to be conflated, with assessment results being used inappropriately to dictate instruction and/or instructional practices being unresponsive to various sources of student data. This paper addresses this issue by using the experiences of an educational non-profit organization in the Dominican Republic in adopting various literacy assessments to assess student progress and inform teacher professional development.

Widespread academic underperformance among students in the Dominican Republic is urging educators and policymakers to explore how the country can improve the quality of its teaching labor force and produce better learning outcomes. Several studies have concluded that factors of teacher quality are the most positively linked with student performance (Akiba et. al., 2003; Ferguson, 1991; Sanders and Rivers, 1996). Elements of teaching and learning such as learning time, teaching methods, assessment and feedback, and the availability of teaching and learning materials are critical to producing educational outcomes such as the development of literacy skills (UNESCO, 2005).

While literacy assessments should not be conflated with instructional guides, low performance results demand changes in or adaptations to instruction. This research paper presents results from a site-based study within an educational enrichment program in the Dominican Republic. This research addresses the following questions: (1) How do teachers use assessment data to inform instructional practice?; (2) What types of professional development do teachers perceive as effective in strengthening their literacy instructional practices?; and (3) How do instructional practices change as a result of professional development that is based on assessment data? Data collected through surveys, teacher observations, and focus groups will be analyzed to present results using a mixed-methods approach. The presentation will discuss the ways in which teacher use of assessment data changes through the provision of targeted professional development opportunities and will conclude by reviewing next steps for measuring long-term change in instructional practice.

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