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2006 - American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education Pages: 4 pages || Words: 1525 words || 
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1. Rhoads, Judie. "Transfer of Learning From Course Instruction Through Implementation of the Teacher Work Sample. Is Online Course Instruction as Effective as Traditional Instruction?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education, Jan 26, 2006 Online <PDF>. 2019-09-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p36332_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This study examines whether preservice teachers transfer assessment skills learned in university coursework to their final student teaching experience. Comparisons between traditional and online course delivery models will be made.

2005 - American Sociological Association Pages: 30 pages || Words: 6317 words || 
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2. Bodovski, Katerina. and Farkas, George. "Do Instructional Practices Contribute to Inequality in Achievement? The Case of Mathematics Instruction in Kindergarten" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Marriott Hotel, Loews Philadelphia Hotel, Philadelphia, PA, Aug 12, 2005 Online <PDF>. 2019-09-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p20456_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: We use ECLS-K data to describe variation in the process and content of kindergarten mathematics instruction, as well as the effects of this instruction on achievement gaps by class and race/ethnicity. We found five dimensions of process and six dimensions of content. Where process is concerned, teachers with higher SES classes were less likely to use traditional instructional methods, whereas teachers in Catholic and other private schools were more likely to use these methods. African-American teachers were more likely to use traditional methods and manipulatives. Teachers with a higher percentage of African-American students were more likely to use group/interactive methods, as were teachers with a higher percentage of Latino students. The latter were also more likely to use manipulatives. Where content is concerned, the only effect of class SES was to increase the teaching of data and approximations. A high share of African-American and Latino students increased the teaching of practical math, single-digit operations, and two-digit operations. Where effectiveness is concerned, traditional mathematics was the only instructional process variable with a significant effect on achievement. This effect is positive. Advanced counting and single digit operations were the instructional content variables that increased achievement. However, none of these instructional variables acted so as to either increase or decrease achievement gaps by either SES or race/ethnicity.

2010 - 54th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society Words: 221 words || 
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3. Evans, Norma. "Malian teachers’ and students’ beliefs about reading and reading instruction: Challenges to reforming reading instruction" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 54th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society, Palmer House Hotel, Chicago, Illinois, <Not Available>. 2019-09-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p400203_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Teachers’ tacitly-held beliefs about learning and their role in the teaching-learning process often serve as “information filters” during training programs. In the case of reading instruction, these filters encourage teachers to attend to innovative practices that align with their beliefs about how children learn to read, and to reject or “reinterpret” those practices that do not. The lack of attention to teacher beliefs around literacy development, and in particular to ill-founded beliefs structures that are hindering the adoption of more effective reading instructional strategies - may be one of the major unexamined impediments to educational reform, and to children learning to read. This paper presents the results of three recent studies undertaken to identify Malian teachers’, teacher educators’ and students beliefs about reading development in general, and age-appropriate reading instructional strategies. When examined in light of the results of the recent EGRA studies, the findings offer some insights into why students are not developing the skills generally identified as essential for reading development. The findings may also explain why Malian teachers who have been trained programs in new, more effective reading instructional practices do not implement the new practices in their classroom. The presentation will conclude by discuss how the lessons learned from these studies may help to inform the design of more effective preservice and inservice reading instructional programs.

2010 - Oklahoma Research Day Words: 194 words || 
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4. Ridlen, Trey. and Knight, Angela. "Transformative Instruction Versus Online Instruction: How Linguistic Inquiry Demonstrates a Difference in Word Usage" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Oklahoma Research Day, Cameron University, Lawton, OK, Nov 12, 2010 <Not Available>. 2019-09-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p484370_index.html>
Publication Type: Abstract
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The Linguistic Inquiry and Word Count (LIWC) is a computer program that measures social words, emotional words, cognitive clarity, and the complexities in human writing (Pennebaker, Booth, and Francis, 2001). Transformative Learning Pedagogy suggests that the students should be transforming into independent thinkers, independent thinking creates greater autonomy (Mezirow, 2000). Transformative Pedagogy, implemented in the Psychology of Grief class, sought to verify the benefits of Transformative Learning with the LIWC program. Students in the fall 2010 turned in writing assignments, which asked for the student’s thoughts and knowledge over a specific week’s instruction. We gave the same assignment to an online version of Psychology of Grief and while students received the same informational content, the online students did not experience Transformative Pedagogy. Both classes writing assignments, ran though the LIWC, reveled a higher word count for students attending the Grief class with Transformative pedagogy. The online Grief class used fewer words with the same writing assignment. Likewise, cognitive words, community words and achievement words are higher in the Transformative Learning Grief class, than in the online control class. LIWC results demonstrate Transformative Learning’s Pedagogy impacts student learning, evidenced by student words usage.

2014 - Tenth Annual Congress of Qualitative Inquiry Words: 159 words || 
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5. Macbeth, Ddouglas. and Yahsi, Zekiye. "Instruction in Real Time: Novitiate Instruction as a Practical Enactment" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Tenth Annual Congress of Qualitative Inquiry, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois, May 21, 2014 <Not Available>. 2019-09-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p719711_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Produced in real time, interaction is instruction’s medium, and shows a sequential organization; sequences ‘progress’. The question for novitiate instruction is roughly: How can they? How can those who don’t know their lesson produce a lesson’s next turn? The puzzle is not for them; classrooms routinely show congregational solutions. It is rather an analytic puzzle for us. And when we press it, we very quickly run into the unremarkable organizations of classroom questions and answers, and are led to ask: By what resources endogenous to a question’s production, as resources for understanding the kind of question it is, do we answer? These are descriptive questions that lie on the ‘surfaces’ of classroom interaction. Using resources from natural language study, sequential analysis and ethnomethodology, this paper examines a lesson on fractions presented to a class of students who do not yet know how to produce them. Yet, they do.

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