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2007 - NCA 93rd Annual Convention Pages: 28 pages || Words: 6299 words || 
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1. Chung, Malcolm., Chen, James., Koch, Pamela. and Lee, Chu Keong. "Towards the Understanding of Instructor-to-Instructor Knowledge Sharing Practices in Singapore" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the NCA 93rd Annual Convention, TBA, Chicago, IL, Nov 15, 2007 Online <PDF>. 2019-06-26 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p193794_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Knowledge sharing is increasingly important in educational organizations. This article looks at peer-to-peer knowledge sharing within educational institutions, from the instructors' perspectives. The study was conducted in Singapore at an public education, with the qualitative approach adopted via in-depth interviews.

2014 - International Communication Association 64th Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: 5596 words || 
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2. Wang, Ruoxu. and Yu, Nan. "Friending Instructors or Not? Student-Instructor’s Social Interaction on Cyberspace" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association 64th Annual Conference, Seattle Sheraton Hotel, Seattle, Washington, May 21, 2014 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-06-26 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p714604_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Students and instructors nowadays can interact with each other via various communicative platforms and social network sites, such as Facebook, Twitter, Google Plus, or LinkedIn. This survey study attempts to explore college students’ decisions of friending their instructors on online social media and to examine factors that can help explain students’ decisions of socially connecting with their instructors on cyberspace. Our findings suggested that individuals who are commonly active on social network sites have a tendency to stay close with their instructors on cyberspace socially. We also found that once the professional relationship between students and instructors ends, students are more likely to socially connect with their instructors online. These findings can be meaningful to future studies and provide new directions for research on student-instructor relationship and computer-mediated communication.

2014 - International Communication Association 64th Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: 8830 words || 
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3. Sidelinger, Robert. and Bolen, Derek. "Instructor Credibility as a Mediator of Instructors’ Compulsive Communication and Student Communication Satisfaction and Interest in the College Classroom" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association 64th Annual Conference, Seattle Sheraton Hotel, Seattle, Washington, May 21, 2014 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-06-26 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p705965_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The purpose of this investigation was twofold: (1) from a dialogic pedagogy perspective, we determined the possible negative associations between instructors’ compulsive communication and the student outcomes: student communication satisfaction and student interest; (2) through the lens of expectancy violations theory we tested the extent instructor credibility mediated the negative associations between compulsive communication and student communication satisfaction and interest. Results found students’ perceptions of instructors’ compulsive communication is linked to lower levels of student communication satisfaction and interest. Results also revealed instructor credibility tempers some of the negative associations between instructors’ compulsive communication and student communication satisfaction and interest. Talkaholic instructors can capitalize on students’ perceptions of instructor goodwill and still maintain satisfactory levels of student communication satisfaction and interest in the classroom.

2010 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 5346 words || 
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4. Cain, Cindy. and Wright, Megan. "Instructors are Part of the Classroom Community, Too: Reflections on Instructor Emotions and Feminist Pedagogy" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton Atlanta and Atlanta Marriott Marquis, Atlanta, GA, Aug 14, 2010 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-06-26 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p410347_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Feminist pedagogy challenges many conventions of traditional teaching methods. Not only does it push teachers to reduce power differences in the classroom, but it also encourages instructors to take personal experiences and emotions seriously. In this paper we suggest that many instructors have integrated the experiences and emotions of their students into the classroom, but that their own emotions are still typically left quiet. In this paper, we describe how both authors stumbled upon a teaching technique in which we expressed emotions that are typically thought to be negative (sadness and anger) without any perceivable negative consequences. In fact, this disclosure seemed to change the classroom environment in a way that fostered community and learning. This technique was especially effective at overcoming students’ resistance to discussions of inequality. We conclude by offering suggestions on how to integrate the emotions of the instructor into a successful classroom community.

2014 - International Communication Association 64th Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: 4975 words || 
Info
5. Frisby, Brandi. and Gaffney, Amy. "Instructor Immediacy, Instructor Rapport, and Student Learning: A Test of the Affective Learning Model" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association 64th Annual Conference, Seattle Sheraton Hotel, Seattle, Washington, May 21, 2014 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-06-26 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p713253_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This study tested the affective learning model (Rodriguez, Plax, & Kearney, 1996) which positions affective learning as a mediator between instructor behaviors and student learning. Participants (N = 146) completed measures of nonverbal immediacy, instructor rapport, perceived cognitive learning, and expected final course grade. Results revealed that the models with instructor rapport, as an indicator of affect toward the instructor, and tests as a mediator between nonverbal immediacy and two different reports of cognitive learning were good both good fits to the data. These results provide insight into the mechanism through which immediacy leads to cognitive learning, differentiates between rapport and immediacy, and includes two different reports of cognitive learning to test the model.

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