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2016 - The Twelfth International Congress of Qualitative Inquiry Words: 144 words || 
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1. Yin, Yin., Goble, Erika., Adams, Catherine. and Vargas Madriz, Francisco. "Inter-view on an inter-face: Using Skype to conduct a qualitative interview" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Twelfth International Congress of Qualitative Inquiry, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois, May 18, 2016 <Not Available>. 2019-12-11 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1112408_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Over past decades, telecommunication software such as Skype and Google Hangout have been pervasively adopted in as a qualitative data collection method. It offers a cost-efficient alternative to supplement, and sometimes even replaces the traditional face-to-face interview. But how does this digital technology alter the nature of the interview? How can we, as qualitative researchers, recognize therefore respond to these possible changes as our research locale increasingly migrating over a digital interface? Drawing upon our experience conducting phenomenological studies, we will discuss how in-depth qualitative interviews differ when they are conducted using telecommunication software as opposed to being undertaken face-to-face and over the telephone. In this presentation, we will address the desire for but impossibility of eye contact; the interviewer being aware of his or her own actions, a variance in temporal sensibility, and the simultaneous closeness and distance created by the digital tool.

2008 - Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication Pages: 44 pages || Words: 11014 words || 
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2. BAEK, YOUNGMIN. and Wojcieszak, Magdalena. "Item Difficulty and Political Learning: Inter-item and Inter-individual Differences Model" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication, Marriott Downtown, Chicago, IL, Aug 06, 2008 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-12-11 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p271786_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Although political knowledge is measured by items with varying difficulty levels, communication studies have not scrutinized the interaction effects between item difficulty and media use on political learning. Drawing from American National Election Study 2004, this analysis investigates whether item difficulty moderates the impact that media use and interpersonal communication have on political learning. We find a noticeable interplay between item difficulty and media effects. While television impacts knowledge about easy political items, newspapers affect the moderately difficult ones, and the contributions that interpersonal talk makes to political knowledge do not depend on item difficulty. Also, communicative behaviors might increase the easy knowledge, whereas socio-structural variables have more explanatory power for the relatively difficult political items. We discuss theoretical and practical implications, and also suggest a new statistical model that combines measurement model for ordered items with multi-level modeling.

2011 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 3478 words || 
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3. Meyer, Uli. "Inter-organizational dynamics in organizational fields. Technological development as a source of self-reinforcing inter-organizational mechanisms" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Caesar's Palace, Las Vegas, NV, Aug 19, 2011 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-12-11 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p507086_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Organizational fields are described as sources of homogeneity and isomorphism (DiMaggio and Powell 1983). But fields are hardly ever collections of homogeneous organizations sharing the same goals and ideas. The issue at hand is how shared understandings and field-wide norms and values can develop in areas that are characterized by high levels of competition, conflicting interests, a changing environment, and a lack of a common, industry-wide coordination.
Interorganizational relations both between different populations in a field (e.g. manufacturers and suppliers or manufacturers and universities) and within a single population (competition for innovativeness between manufacturers) are crucial sources of self-reinforcing dynamics. They can be intended yet also unintended consequences of intentional actions. However, even intended actions can create dynamics which are beyond the control of their creators. Besides the analytical level of the organizational field, other concepts of institutional theory, especially institutionalization, institutional work, framing and theorizing contribute to the description of specific mechanisms and dynamics. They help to describe the interplay between stability and change which lies at the heart of phenomena like organizational fields or innovation paths.

2005 - International Communication Association Pages: 36 pages || Words: 13931 words || 
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4. Shi, Yu. "“The Chinese? Better not to Do Anything Wrong”: How Chinese Working-Class Immigrant Women Negotiate Racial/Ethnic Identities and Inter-racial and Inter-ethnic Tensions" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Sheraton New York, New York City, NY, Online <PDF>. 2019-12-11 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p11982_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: As part of a larger project, which examines the racial/ethnic, gender, class, and cultural identities of Chinese immigrant working-class women, this paper focuses on how immigrant woman workers negotiate their racial/ethnic identities in particular. The researcher spent one year in the San Francisco Bay Area doing fieldwork among Chinese immigrant woman workers and found out that, upon migration, these women have gone through horrible experiences of racial/ethnic discrimination. In reaction, they have developed a strong Chinese nationalist sentiment and a collective ethnic identity. However, when they withdraw to their nationalist sentiment, the host society does not hesitate to use the withdrawal as a pretext to question their loyalty and to further deny their due rights as American citizens. With limited opportunities and life needs at the doorstep, the women often find it necessary to adopt certain white cultural norms. But they have never stopped negotiating with external racial oppressions and white supremacist ideas. In this process of negotiation, Chinese ethnic media messages have both liberating and paralyzing influences.

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