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2018 - MPSA Annual Conference Words: 39 words || 
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1. Seeberg, Henrik. and Jensen, Carsten. "Interest Representation in Hostile Territory: What do Interest Groups do When the Public Agenda Turns Against Their Interests?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the MPSA Annual Conference, Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, IL, Apr 05, 2018 <Not Available>. 2019-06-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1348888_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: How do interest groups react when the public agenda turns hostile to their interests? We analyze the public agenda on alcohol consumption in Denmark and 257 press releases from the Danish brewer association from the 1990s up until today.

2004 - The Midwest Political Science Association Pages: 36 pages || Words: 8678 words || 
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2. Fellowes, Matthew. "Conflict of Interests: A Theory ofPolicy Competition Between Organized Interests" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Midwest Political Science Association, Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, Illinois, Apr 15, 2004 <Not Available>. 2019-06-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p83817_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Organizational theorists contend that democracy rests on compromise between groups, however, recent evidence indicates that a large number of organizations lobby without encountering countervailing pressure. In this paper, I consider numerous institutional and organizational conditions that may create countervailing pressure in the public policy process. Hypotheses are tested with data collected from a survey of nearly 200 organizations that lobbied before the federal government in 2003. I find that countervailing pressure is more likely to occur when organizations: a) are labor unions; b) have highly visible lobbying agendas; c) lobby a government agency; or d) lobby against a policy that the public views favorably. These findings indicate that the expectations of organizational theorists for democracy are fully satisfied by institutional and organizational conditions that characterize the experience of only a minority of lobbying organizations.

2004 - The Midwest Political Science Association Words: 289 words || 
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3. Teigen, Jeremy. "Candidates, Interest Groups, and their Ostensible Voting Blocs: Toward Identifying the Structure and Efficacy of Elite and Interest Group Mobilization" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Midwest Political Science Association, Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, Illinois, Apr 15, 2004 <Not Available>. 2019-06-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p82530_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The past ten years of elite mobilization research has
identified the role of electoral campaigns in spurring targeted voter
turnout (e.g. Rosenstone & Hansen 1993), and the recently increased
role of interest groups in electioneering has also been explored (e.g.
Rozell & Wilcox 1999). Left underdeveloped in the literature is the
three-way linkage between a candidate and his or her targeted voting
bloc via interest groups. Taking a cue from the social network and
social structure literatures (e.g. Huckfeldt & Sprague, Putnam)
that explore the role of interpersonal relationships in political
communication transfer, this paper examines the role of interest groups
in that chain of campaign information distribution. This track of
research augments our understanding of interest groups’ political
impact. In addition, it clarifies our understanding of their role
within electoral campaigns.
Interest groups maintain members who joined for solidary or purposive
reasons, but groups often purport to represent the interests of its
nonmembers as well: those of the appropriate demographic or
qualifications who ostensibly share the same interest but are not
members. Using individual-level exit polling data coupled with
strategic elite electoral behavior data (qualitative interview data,
campaign spending data, etc.), this paper provides selected tests to
ascertain the role and gauge the efficacy of interest groups vis-à-vis
electioneering. Of particular interest is the degree to which interest
groups connect to not only their members, but to their nonmembers as
well, using social networks.
Germane interest groups and voting bloc pairs include the AARP and
senior citizens, conservative Christian groups and self-identifying
Christians, racial and ethnically-defined interest groups and blacks
and Hispanics, the American Legion and the VFW and military veterans.
Results will also contradistinguish primary and general elections for
the purposes of isolating the potentially confounding effect of party.
Election periods for which data are available and pertinent for helping
test the theory are 2002 general election exit polls along with
selected 2000 primary contests and the 2000 general election.

2005 - The Midwest Political Science Association Words: 37 words || 
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4. Miler, Kris. "Constituency Interests and Congressional Behavior: Whose Interests are Represented?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Midwest Political Science Association, Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, Illinois, Apr 07, 2005 <Not Available>. 2019-06-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p85990_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper examines congressional representation by focusing on which constituencies in a district are represented. I offer an empirical analysis and find that legislators are more likely to act on behalf of certain subconstituencies than others.

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