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2018 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 9522 words || 
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1. Ali, Nadiya. "(Mus)interpreted = Misinterpreted + Muslim Interpreted" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Pennsylvania Convention Center & Philadelphia Marriott, Philadelphia, PA, Aug 09, 2018 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-08-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1379620_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The existing Islamophobia literature has aptly illustrated how the tragedy of 9/11 and the discourses that followed have situated ‘Muslims’ in a multifaceted system of reductive caricatures and security structures such that the Muslim subject “can at a moment’s notice be erected as [an] object of supervision and discipline” (Morey & Yaqin, 2011, p. 5-6). The current paper builds off this structural analysis, however orients attention to the agents that sit at the receiving end of this architecture. Examining an annual multi-medium exhibit featuring the artistic works of Muslim women in the Greater Toronto Area (GTA), I ask what (re)imaginings and possibilities of place, voice and emancipation are available in our Islamophobic age? What possibilities can we detangle from closely engaging with the negotiation patterns of the agents living the everyday of Islamophobia. (Mus)interpreted - an amalgamation of misinterpreted and Muslim interpreted - is an exhibit oriented towards uncovering-dismantling-and-rectifying the politics of living and finding ‘home’ amidst the backdrop of the problematic subject frame. The paper will engage with the ‘artistic statements’ of nearly two dozen multi-medium curated pieces, and ask what possibilities of place, voice and emancipation remain for the post 9/11 Muslim subject in our increasingly securitized and racialized age. There will also be a sustained attention given to issues of recognition/misrecognition/nonrecognition, broadly asking if the politics of recognition is framed as the site for emancipatory re-imaginings, or as the curators put it, as the grounds for “inclusive-future[s]”?

2018 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 1727 words || 
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2. Bell, Susan. "We Lost Our Interpreter, Have to Use the Phone: Assembling Interpreters in Healthcare Settings" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Pennsylvania Convention Center & Philadelphia Marriott, Philadelphia, PA, Aug 09, 2018 Online <PDF>. 2019-08-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1380048_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In the twenty-first century more and more people cross borders for longer distances and varying lengths of time with differentiated and uneven rates, pathways and routes of mobility (Burawoy 2001). In 2015, 224 million people worldwide were living in a country other than the one in which they were born, including almost 20 million refugees. In the US, 27 percent of the population is immigrants or children of immigrants (84.3 million), and more than 9 percent of people ages 5 and (25.9 million) report limited English proficiency (LEP) (Zong and Batalova 2017). US hospitals have developed a variety of strategies to meet federal requirements and provide culturally and linguistically appropriate health care for LEP patients. A key element in the strategy is the use of healthcare interpreters. This paper analyzes the contingent and unstable combinations of heterogeneous human and nonhuman elements that form and disperse during interpreted outpatient visits to the hospital. It argues that interpreted visits are place-specific and that Maine’s accumulated immigration history and mixture of racial and ethnic relations create a particular multilingual setting for hospital care. It proposes the concept of interpreter assemblage to make sense of the transnational mixes of people, objects, and ideas that meet in the exam room. This paper analyzes medically interpreted visits to two outpatient clinics in one hospital in Maine, based on nine months of fieldwork in 2012 that included observations of 69 adult immigrant and refugee patients as well as interpreters and clinic staff, during 85 outpatient visits.

2014 - International Communication Association 64th Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: 9362 words || 
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3. Hmielowski, Jay., Jain, Parul., Cohen, Jonathan. and Ewoldsen, David. "Looking Deeper Into the Narrative Interpretation Process: Exploring the Determinants and Dynamics of Reacting to and Interpreting Media Stories" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association 64th Annual Conference, Seattle Sheraton Hotel, Seattle, Washington, May 21, 2014 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-08-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p713371_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Two studies examined the process of how people come to understand media stories. Drawing on reception studies and the understanding that people actively interpret narratives, our first study shows that pre-existing attitudes, identification, transportation, and which episode was viewed predicted which interpretation was chosen. In Study 2, results again show that pre-exposure attitudes, identification and transportation predicted different interpretations. The results also showed that identification and transportation changed over the course of the film. However, outcome measures were not significantly correlated with interpretation. Results are discussed in terms of their contribution to reception theory and the understanding of narrative engagement.

2015 - SRCD Biennial Meeting Words: 366 words || 
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4. Mills-Smith, Laura., Spangler, Derek., Panneton, Robin. and Fritz, Matthew. "The Interpretive Utility of Infant-Calibrated Cutoffs for Interpreting Effect Size Estimates" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SRCD Biennial Meeting, Pennsylvania Convention Center and the Philadelphia Marriott Downtown Hotel, Philadelphia, PA, Mar 19, 2015 <Not Available>. 2019-08-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p961740_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Poster
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Difficulties inherent in infant and child research (e.g., recruitment, attrition, response variability) require innovation in creative experimental design and analysis to maximize empirical value. In addition, the American Psychological Association (APA, 2010) requires that effect size estimates (ESE) be reported to provide a better indication of the associative strength between factors and dependent measures. Accordingly, developmental journals require or strongly recommend ESEs be included in published work.
The current study examined recent infant research from select developmental journals for accuracy and interpretative value of ESEs. Demographics, sample size, design and statistical data were coded from 160 published (2007-2012) articles presenting 544 ESEs from experimental findings with infants using behavioral methods. Descriptive and distribution statistics were calculated for the following variables: (1) statistical tests, (2) effect size parameters, and (3) effect size interpretations. Although partial eta squared (ηp2) and eta squared (η2) were most common (49% and 42%, respectively), “η confusion” was apparent, and interpretation of ESEs was virtually non-existent, with only 2% of ESEs interpreted. Of those, all provided a generic categorization based on Cohen’s cutoffs (i.e., ‘small,’ ‘medium,’ and ‘large’; 1962) with no further conceptual interpretation offered.
As it has been recommended that cutoffs be calibrated to specific disciplines, infant-calibrated cutoffs were identified from the ESE distributions of this sample. When these infant-calibrated cutoffs were used to assign magnitude labels to each of the ηp2 main effect ESEs in this sample, 71.9% were smaller compared to Cohen’s classification scheme. That is, if each ηp2 main effect ESE were labeled using Cohen’s cutoffs and the infant-calibrated cutoffs from this sample, 28.1% would be assessed as the same magnitude, whereas all others would be classified as relatively smaller with the infant-calibrated cutoffs (i.e., “medium” to “small” (39.6%); “large” to “medium” (32.3%)). We argue that this adjustment has interpretive utility for deciding how to discuss and compare results across the early developmental literature.
Collectively, this survey found that infant researchers are not maximizing the empirical utility of the ESE they report and in some cases may even be reporting ESE inaccurately. As a result, suggestions for improving reporting accuracy and increasing the interpretive value of ESE will be offered.

2012 - American Studies Association Annual Meeting Words: 450 words || 
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5. Hart, William. "To interpret faithfully...whether you believe it or not: Jonathan Pointer, Black Interpreter to the Wyandots" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Studies Association Annual Meeting, Puerto Rico Convention Center and the Caribe Hilton., San Juan, Puerto Rico, Nov 15, 2012 <Not Available>. 2019-08-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p569048_index.html>
Publication Type: Internal Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Jonathan Pointer (1784 - 1857), an African-American interpreter who lived among the Wyandot Indians at Upper Sandusky, Ohio, lived “between worlds” because white racial attitudes informed social relations in this part of Indian country. Although kidnapped by the Wyandots when a boy of seven and raised by them, Pointer lacked both a Wyandot spouse and a Wyandot name, often conferred upon adoption, and therefore was never fully integrated into Wyandot society. Yet Pointer became one of the Wyandots’ most trusted and dependable interpreters during the first half of the nineteenth century. He served as personal interpreter to John Stewart, a black exhorter who insinuated himself among the Wyandots. Pointer’s race, status, and role raise a number of questions for historians who study kidnap victims, interpreters, and go-betweens in Indian country. What was Pointer’s true relationship to the Wyandots? Did he identify as Wyandot or as “Negro”? Did the Wyandots divide Pointer into two equal parts, keeping one part for themselves and the other for the Americans, as the Mohawks did Conrad Weiser? Or did Pointer operate from what Frances Kartunnen calls the “perspective of the marginalized”? In assigning Pointer to Stewart, what were the Wyandots saying about race in early-19th-century Indian country in Ohio?
Pointer possessed strong linguistic skills and a deep understanding of Wyandot culture, qualities that were critical for successful interpreters. Yet, Pointer lived in the Wyandot world but was not of it. He was just as firmly connected to the residents at nearby Negrotown as he was to those at Upper Sandusky. Yet most Wyandots had full faith in Pointer’s abilities, and few whites objected to his presence.
Pointer’s role and presence in Wyandot country is important because it complicates the more familiar dynamic of Indian/white broker history. Blacks were ubiquitous on the eighteenth- and nineteenth-century frontiers. They played a range of roles in Indian country, from interpreter to servant to windows onto Indian and white worlds. Jonathan Pointer remained a black man among the Wyandots, this paper argues, largely because by the early nineteenth century, a large number of whites and mixed-race Wyandots constituted the Wyandot nation. Most of Pointer’s Wyandot owners were either white or were married to whites. As such, by the early 19th century, white racial attitudes informed social relations at Upper Sandusky. When he was young, Pointer was at best a panis, a war captive whose social status in Wyandot society was that of servant. As an adult, however, Pointer lived apart as a free black man – a functionary rather than family -- between Wyandot, white, and African-American worlds.

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