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2011 - Seventh International Congress of Qualitative Inquiry Words: 151 words || 
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1. Nepveux, Denise. "Interpreter as participant: Excavating the meaning-making work of an insider interpreter in social movement research" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Seventh International Congress of Qualitative Inquiry, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champain Illini Union, Urbana, IL, <Not Available>. 2019-05-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p494855_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This paper reflects upon epistemological issues arising in transnational, cross-cultural research on local manifestations of global social movements. Drawing upon transcripts from a US researcher’s life-story interviews with grass-roots women participants in Ghana’s disability movement, it excavates ways in which knowledge was co-produced by a triad of interviewer, interpreter, and interview participant. It highlights moments in which the interpreter – a disability movement participant with no formal training in interpretation -- elaborated to convey ambiguous concepts to participants, who then took up or rejected her interpretation as they narrated their experiences of community belonging and marginalization. Although it could be argued, from a postpositivist standpoint, that such elaborations introduced “bias,” a constructivist approach values such moments as windows into a movement’s diverse and changing discourses and its cultural and political context. Careful transcription, translation and interpretation of the interpreter’s dynamic contributions allows the full richness of three-way interview dialogues to emerge.

2018 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 9522 words || 
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2. Ali, Nadiya. "(Mus)interpreted = Misinterpreted + Muslim Interpreted" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Pennsylvania Convention Center & Philadelphia Marriott, Philadelphia, PA, Aug 09, 2018 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-05-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1379620_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The existing Islamophobia literature has aptly illustrated how the tragedy of 9/11 and the discourses that followed have situated ‘Muslims’ in a multifaceted system of reductive caricatures and security structures such that the Muslim subject “can at a moment’s notice be erected as [an] object of supervision and discipline” (Morey & Yaqin, 2011, p. 5-6). The current paper builds off this structural analysis, however orients attention to the agents that sit at the receiving end of this architecture. Examining an annual multi-medium exhibit featuring the artistic works of Muslim women in the Greater Toronto Area (GTA), I ask what (re)imaginings and possibilities of place, voice and emancipation are available in our Islamophobic age? What possibilities can we detangle from closely engaging with the negotiation patterns of the agents living the everyday of Islamophobia. (Mus)interpreted - an amalgamation of misinterpreted and Muslim interpreted - is an exhibit oriented towards uncovering-dismantling-and-rectifying the politics of living and finding ‘home’ amidst the backdrop of the problematic subject frame. The paper will engage with the ‘artistic statements’ of nearly two dozen multi-medium curated pieces, and ask what possibilities of place, voice and emancipation remain for the post 9/11 Muslim subject in our increasingly securitized and racialized age. There will also be a sustained attention given to issues of recognition/misrecognition/nonrecognition, broadly asking if the politics of recognition is framed as the site for emancipatory re-imaginings, or as the curators put it, as the grounds for “inclusive-future[s]”?

2018 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 1727 words || 
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3. Bell, Susan. "We Lost Our Interpreter, Have to Use the Phone: Assembling Interpreters in Healthcare Settings" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Pennsylvania Convention Center & Philadelphia Marriott, Philadelphia, PA, Aug 09, 2018 Online <PDF>. 2019-05-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1380048_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In the twenty-first century more and more people cross borders for longer distances and varying lengths of time with differentiated and uneven rates, pathways and routes of mobility (Burawoy 2001). In 2015, 224 million people worldwide were living in a country other than the one in which they were born, including almost 20 million refugees. In the US, 27 percent of the population is immigrants or children of immigrants (84.3 million), and more than 9 percent of people ages 5 and (25.9 million) report limited English proficiency (LEP) (Zong and Batalova 2017). US hospitals have developed a variety of strategies to meet federal requirements and provide culturally and linguistically appropriate health care for LEP patients. A key element in the strategy is the use of healthcare interpreters. This paper analyzes the contingent and unstable combinations of heterogeneous human and nonhuman elements that form and disperse during interpreted outpatient visits to the hospital. It argues that interpreted visits are place-specific and that Maine’s accumulated immigration history and mixture of racial and ethnic relations create a particular multilingual setting for hospital care. It proposes the concept of interpreter assemblage to make sense of the transnational mixes of people, objects, and ideas that meet in the exam room. This paper analyzes medically interpreted visits to two outpatient clinics in one hospital in Maine, based on nine months of fieldwork in 2012 that included observations of 69 adult immigrant and refugee patients as well as interpreters and clinic staff, during 85 outpatient visits.

2010 - NCA 96th Annual Convention Words: 71 words || 
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4. Shineman, Kirt. "Performing (Against) Type: Cultural Appropriation in Oral Interpretation - Is There a Crisis of Representation in Forensics Oral Interpretation?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the NCA 96th Annual Convention, Hilton San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, <Not Available>. 2019-05-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p420591_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This paper questions the basic assumptions within forensics oral interpretation concerning who can represent whom. The current crisis of representation stems from the inevitability of representation and from an attendant recognition of the necessity for understanding how the mechanism(s) of representation in forensics contain covert as well as overt ideological messages. Should a white man perform a play by August Wilson? Should a woman perform a poem by Henry Charles Bukowski?

2014 - International Communication Association 64th Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: 9362 words || 
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5. Hmielowski, Jay., Jain, Parul., Cohen, Jonathan. and Ewoldsen, David. "Looking Deeper Into the Narrative Interpretation Process: Exploring the Determinants and Dynamics of Reacting to and Interpreting Media Stories" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association 64th Annual Conference, Seattle Sheraton Hotel, Seattle, Washington, May 21, 2014 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-05-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p713371_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Two studies examined the process of how people come to understand media stories. Drawing on reception studies and the understanding that people actively interpret narratives, our first study shows that pre-existing attitudes, identification, transportation, and which episode was viewed predicted which interpretation was chosen. In Study 2, results again show that pre-exposure attitudes, identification and transportation predicted different interpretations. The results also showed that identification and transportation changed over the course of the film. However, outcome measures were not significantly correlated with interpretation. Results are discussed in terms of their contribution to reception theory and the understanding of narrative engagement.

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